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Mushtaq Ahmed
Mushtaq Ahmed
Demystify the Reactive Jargons
Mushtaq Ahmed
Mushtaq Ahmed

Sync, Async, Blocking, Non-Blocking, Streaming are the buzzwords in the reactive programming world. This talk will attempt to attach some meaning to them. It will also demo the performance and resource consumption patterns for blocking-io, Scala Futures and RxJava Observables for comparable programs. Finally, a command line application that consumes twitter streams API will demo what is possible using the new reactive abstractions.

Duration: 60 mins
Level: Intermediate
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concurrency  
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scala  
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non-blocking  
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async  
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streams  
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rxjava  
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2 weeks ago by Mushtaq Ahmed

Mohit Thatte
Mohit Thatte
Purely functional data structures demystified
Mohit Thatte
Mohit Thatte

Immutable, persistent data structures form a big part of the value proposition of most functional programming languages.

It is important to understand why these data structures are useful and how they make it easier to reason about your program. 

It is also instructive to see how these data structures are implemented to get a greater appreciation for the inherent tradeoffs between performance and immutability.

In this talk I will do a walkthrough of some of these data structures drawing from the work of Chris Okasaki[1], and attempt to explain the essential ideas in a simple way. 


[1] Purely Functional Data Structures, Chris Okasaki, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University 

Duration: 45 mins
Type:  Talk
Level: Beginner
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1 month ago by Mohit Thatte

Shashi Gowda
Shashi Gowda
Functional Reactive UIs with Elm
Shashi Gowda
Shashi Gowda

Elm is a strongly typed functional reactive programming (FRP) language that compiles to HTML, CSS, and Javascript. In Elm, the Signal type represents a time-varying value--things like mouse position, keys pressed, current time are signals. With Signals, one can write terse code that is isomorphic to a dataflow diagram of the app. The code hence feels natural and is 100% callback free. All this, with powerful type inference.

This talk is an introduction to FRP. It explores functionally composing graphics and UIs, and creating interactions and animations with the Signal type. There will also be an overview of Elm’s execution mechanism and the time traveling debugger: a consequence of Elm's purely functional approach.

While instructive, it will be good fun too, in the spirit of Elm.

Duration: 90 mins
Type:  Tutorial
Level: Beginner
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javascript  
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web  
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interaction  
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ui  
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html  
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elm  
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animation  
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1 month ago by Shashi Gowda

Bhasker Kode
Bhasker Kode
Writing and improving tail recursive functions
Bhasker Kode
Bhasker Kode

What is tail recursion?

Snippets from a few languages

Design choices around recursion

What kind of functions can be made tail-recursive? 

How do you profile such improvements?

 

 

Duration: 45 mins
Type:  Talk
Level: Beginner
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recursion  
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1 month ago by Bhasker Kode

Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan
Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan
An introduction to Continuation Passing Style (CPS)
Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan
Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan

Traditionally functions return some value. Someone is waiting for that value and does some computation with it. This "someone" is called the continuation of this value. In a normal functional call, the continuation is "implicit". In the "continuation passing style" (hence forth called with the short form, CPS), we make the continuations explicit. In this style, function definitions take an extra argument called "continuation" and it never return. The "return value" of the function 'continues' by passing this value as an argument to the continuation. Continuations are sometimes called "gotos with arguments".

CPS is used as an intermediate stage while compiling a program since it makes the control structure of the program explicit and hence can be converted easily to machine code. Another feature of a CPS-transformed function is that it is tail-recursive even if the original function was not written in a tail-recursive style.

Continuations enable a programmer to build new control operators (if the language's built-in operators does not already provide the control operators the programmer need).

Duration: 60 mins
Type:  Tutorial
Level: Intermediate
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Vagmi Mudumbai
Vagmi Mudumbai
Clojurescript and Om - Pragmatic functional programming in the Javascript Land
Vagmi Mudumbai
Vagmi Mudumbai

Javascript programmers have had a lot of choices when it comes to programming. There were days of mootools, scriptaculous and jQuery and then there are now days of Angular, Ember, Knockout and the like. As a javascript programmer myself, I find that Clojurescript/React as Om offers a fresh perspective into building performant Javascript UIs that are easy to write.

The talk will introduced concepts of React, immutable datastructures in Clojure and live code an application that demonstrates the concepts.

 

Duration: 60 mins
Level: Beginner
1 month ago by Vagmi Mudumbai

Venkat Subramaniam
Venkat Subramaniam
Haskell for Everyday Programmers
Venkat Subramaniam
Venkat Subramaniam

I learn different languages not to make use of them, but to program in my current languages in a better way. As we adapt functional style of programming in mainstream languages, like Java, C#, and C++, we can learn a great deal from a language that is touted as a purely functional language.

Haskell is statically typed, but not in a way like Java, C#, or C++. Its static typing does not get in the way of productivity. Haskell quietly does lazy evaluation and enforces functional purity for greater good. Everyday programmers, like your humble speaker, who predominantly code in mainstream languages, can greatly benefit from learning the idioms and style of this elegant language. The next time we sit down to crank out some code in just about any language, we can make use of some of those styles, within the confines of the languages, and move towards a better, functional style.

Duration: 90 mins
Type:  Talk
Level: Intermediate
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2 weeks ago by Venkat Subramaniam

Debasish Ghosh
Debasish Ghosh
Property based testing for functional domain models
Debasish Ghosh
Debasish Ghosh

Manual testing is something that's error prone, incomplete and impossible to replicate on a large scale. We have instead been using xUnit style of testing for quite some time now. This approach has a number of drawbacks like (a) We need to write test cases by hand which again doesn't scale for large systems (b) We may miss out some of the edge cases (c) Safeguarding missing cases with coverage metrics doesn't help, since metrics are mostly based on heuristics (d) maintaining test cases and test data is a real pain.

In property based testing we write properties and not low level test cases. And let the system generate test cases which validate such properties. There are 2 main advantages with this approach:

  1. You think in terms of properties (or specifications) of the domain model which is the right granularity to think about
  2. You don't need to manage test cases, which is completely done by the system that generates a large collection of test data

This approach is ideal for the functional programming paradigm, which focuses on pure functions. Using functional programming it's easier to reason about your model - hence it's easier to test functional programs using properties. In this talk I will take some real world examples of property validation and verification using scalacheck (the property based testing library for Scala) and a real world domain model.

Duration: 45 mins
Type:  Talk
Level: Intermediate
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2 weeks ago by Debasish Ghosh

Dhaval Dalal
Dhaval Dalal
Code Jugalbandi
Dhaval Dalal
Dhaval Dalal

In Indian classical music, we have Jugalbandi, where two lead musicians or vocalist engage in a playful competition. there is jugalbandi between Flutist and a Percussionist (say using Tabla as the instrument). Compositions rendered by flutist will be heard by the percussionist and will replay the same notes, but now on Tabla and vice-versa is also possible.

In a similar way, we will perform Code Jugalbandi to see how the solution looks using different languages and paradigms.

Duration: 60 mins
Level: Beginner
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2 weeks ago by Dhaval Dalal

Ryan Lemmer
Ryan Lemmer
Distributed computing: dealing with Time and Failure in the wild
Ryan Lemmer
Ryan Lemmer

Distributed systems can spread their workload/data over many machines, elastically, as the need arises (e.g. the distributed databases, Riak, Amazon S3, ElaticSearch, ...)

Many business applications could benefit from this ability to dynamically scale horizontally, but writing distributed systems is even harder than writing concurrent systems. We need all the help we can get.

In this talk, after introducing the fundamental concepts and challenges of distributed computation, we’ll explore 2 very different frameworks/approaches you can use to create distributed systems: Storm and Akka.

Distributed Programming benefits from immutability, so idiomatic of Functional Programming. In fact, both Storm and Akka have strong roots in functional languages (for Storm it is Clojure, and for Akka, Scala).

As different as these approaches are, we will see that the underlying difficulties of Distributed Computation remains evident in both: dealing with time, and dealing with failure.

Duration: 45 mins
Level: Intermediate
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akka  
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2 weeks ago by Ryan Lemmer

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