Metrics have always been used in corporate sectors, primarily as a way to gain insight into what is an otherwise invisible world. Not only that, "standards bodies", such as CMMi, require metrics to achieve a certain maturity level. These two factors tend to drive organizations to blindly adopt a set of metrics as a way of satisfying some process transparency requirement. Rarely do any organizations apply any statistical or scientific thought behind the measures and metrics they establish and interpret.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Primarily a talk with metrics suggested by the audience to be criticized or praised.

Learning Outcome

In this talk, we'll look at some common AND HUMEROUS testing metrics and discuss why they fail to represent what most people believe they do. We'll discuss the real purpose of metrics, issues with metric programs, how to leverage metrics effectively, and finally specific measure and metric pitfalls organizations encounter.

Target Audience

quality assurance, anyone interested in metrics

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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