Are you an optimist or a pessimist? This exercise illustrates the language (verbal and non-verbal) and perspectives present when being an optimist or a pessimist.

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Demonstration

  1. (5 min) Opener
    • What is an optimist or a pessimist?
    • What makes people on our teams optimistic or pessimistic?
    • Run a quick example - choose a volunteer to come up
      • Explain: I'll project or show a big image on screen
      • You're the optimist, I'm the pessimist
      • Take turns for 2 minutes, switching after 1 minute, we'll tell each other the optimistic/pessimistic version of the story behind the picture
  2. (15 min) Main exercise
    1. Now pair up - choose who's starting off as the optimist and pessimist
    2. I'll flash a new image - switch roles after one minute
    3. Repeat the process for 3 more images
  3. (10min) Debrief
    1. What did you notice about your partner during the various images and role swaps?
    2. What did you notice about your perspectives - did they change?
    3. Did you feel like your partner was listening?
    4. What did you notice about the language used?
    5. Can you think of ways to use this with your team, family, etc.?

Learning Outcome

Are you an optimist or a pessimist? This exercise illustrates the language (verbal and non-verbal) and perspectives present when being an optimist or a pessimist.

Target Audience

Team members, leaders, anyone

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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