We are going to share a case study of how we kick start a LeSS (Large Scaled Scrum) agile transition in FDA (Food & Drugs Administration) regulated organization. The product is a surgery X-Ray machine and the team include software engineer, mechanical engineer, electronical engineer. After one year journey, the product get shipped within one year comparing to 2.5 years of previous version. No bug was found after shipping the product so far and the build time reduced from 20+ hrs to 2.8 secs. What made these happen? One of the biggest challenges is how to enable cross-functional and self-managing team and to make it more challenging, everyone had to choose their role and teams. In this talk, I am going to share with you how we official launched the change and how we as agile coaches support in their agile journey. 

 

 

 

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

“Pause and ponder happens in organizations because there will be lots of challenges at the very beginning of agile transition. 

•How to a set up a 7-member-cross-function team that focuses on custom value?  

•Scrum put much emphasis on self-managing team. But if someone isn’t sure about which team he/she is in, then it’s not self-managing. How can a team member make her own decision of which team he/she belongs to?  

•How to maximize the potential of each team member, to stimulate their self-initiative, to help them become adults who are will to take responsibilities? 

•How to ensure the close collaboration among software team, hardware team and electric team? 

•How to ensure the collaboration across multiple scrum team? 

•How to meet the conditions of the FDA’s standard, rules and regulations during the process of agile transition? 

 

Learning Outcome

Audiences will understand: 

1.How to kick off self-management culture in a traditional organization’s agile transition. 

2.The method to facilitate team self-design workshop. 

3.Problems and possible solutions of a self-managing starter team. Hopefully it could inspire the audience to find their own way of agile adaption. 

Target Audience

Agile Coaches, Executives, Senior managers, ScrumMasters

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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  • Michael Chik
    By Michael Chik  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Daniel,

    Would you be able to do this talk in 45 min?

    Cheers,

    Michael


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