• Liked Victoria Schiffer
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    Agile Coaching? Sure thing! What about Life Coaching in Agile Thinking?

    Victoria Schiffer
    Victoria Schiffer
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    I love being around awesome people, who build great products customers desire. 
    I love learning from and together with these amazing minds. 
    I love creating the right environment for teams to flourish. 
    I love change, and learning from new experiences. 
    I love working in Agile environments.

    How about you? 
    I bet there are some elements of this list why you're in Agile, too. And you can probably add even more elements to it.

    The Agile Manifesto states amongst others individuals and interactions, customer collaboration and responding to change.

    In our everyday life doing Agile we already respect these aspects in many ways. 
    But do we practice what we preach as best we can?

    I'd like to challenge your current way of thinking about people and processes. 
    I'd like to challenge you to focus on you, before you focus on others. 
    I'd like to challenge your current way of reflecting. 
    I'd like to inspire you to go different ways. 
    I'd like to inspire you to inspire others.

    In Agile we're already good in improving our processes and creating well performing teams and hence building the right things in the right way. And in the Agile Manifesto's communication and collaboration piece we can even get better.
    "You have not yet reached the limit of what you're capable of!" means we can always further improve. And we do follow this idea in our Agile processes, too, through continuous feedback (Retrospectives) and improvement.

    And why not take it even further? Why not go "Beyond Agile"?!

    Here's where aspects of Life Coaching come in handy: through also understanding and improving ourselves (how do we interact with people due to how we perceive our environment) we will even further improve communication and collaboration.

    Life Coaches believe our clients know the answer. And even if Agile Coaching is slightly different than Life Coaching, I see it as very relevant in Agile Coaching, too. If we apply this in Agile, instead of giving our clients (team, colleagues) the answers, asking them powerful questions to help them be more aware of what's happening at the moment, they will find their answer for it and will have a much better commitment to making the change for themselves, their teams and the company. It's not for us to TELL them what to do, but to ASK them what's going on for themselves. Here's where I see a huge chance for improvement.

    In my session I give lots of examples on how to link Life Coaching ideas to our Agile work environments. I've given the session at LAST Conference Melbourne and at the Agile Coaching Circles Meetup Melbourne. The audience was engaged and the attendees were very happy about having some new ideas on how to improve their daily work life.

    Come along to be inspired by Life Coaching and thus to benefit our Agile Thinking!

  • Liked Bernd Schiffer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Net Promoter System for Agile Companies

    Bernd Schiffer
    Bernd Schiffer
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Customer collaboration is essential to every Agile business. To create and collaborate to keep a customer is the purpose of an organisation. But still lots of companies try to make bad profits, i.e. profits earned at the expense of customer relationships. The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a renowned open-source system which addresses and measures customer collaboration. And did you know that you not only can use it to get feedback on your products and services, but also on your employees and your personal performance?

    NPS is a perfect fit for Agile companies - and those who want to be. Most of the companies I worked with (Agile coaching, training, consulting) had not heard about it, and far less were actually using it. This really surprises me, since NPS integrates like a charm with Agile, e.g. within product development via Scrum.

    In this session I'll explain the basics of NPS, i.e. promoters and detractors, satisfied and delighted customers, bad profits (how to deal with bad feedback?) and good profits, and why and how to measure these. Several stories from companies like Apple Retail, Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and others will help to make my point. I’ll further show why NPS is a very good fit with Agile regarding products, employees, and personal performance. Dos and Don’ts regarding NPS (also from personal experience) will close this session. Related to the Don'ts, I also cover some of the negative critiques out there.

  • Liked Tathagat Varma
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Agile, Management 3.0, Holacracy...what next?

    Tathagat Varma
    Tathagat Varma
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Pesentation deck is now available at http://www.slideshare.net/Managewell/what-next-31791295

    Modern management methods are still based on the then seminal work by Henri Fayol some 200 years back, followed by Frederick Taylor's work some 100 years back! Sadly, those models were predominantly based on industrial work, and don't really work that well in knowledge industry and today's sociological dynamics at workplace. Classical Agile methods codify several people practices that allow for a self-organizing team to evolve, but doesn't offer a lot of guidance on how to develop and groom leadership for agile organizations beyond a software team. Management 3.0 takes this issue further and develops it into a separate discipline altogether. On similar lines, Holacracy seeks to create social technology for purposeful organizations, though not specially targeting software organizations. So, the issue of leadership still continues to be unresolved and rather left to pave its way on its own. Unfortunately, when we want to achieve true end-to-end agility, it is not enough for software teams to be charging at top speeds but leadership not evenly matched to support them well in their endeavors. We clearly have a problem at hand...

    In this talk, we will study how the role of leadership has evolved and what does it look like for agile organizations at present. Many agile methods take an extreme view that limit leadership to team-level collective ownership of leadership. However, that might not be enough because of various reasons. In any non-trivial organization, whether a software organizations or any modern business employing software for business advantage, the reality is that organization units beyond a plain-vanilla software teams do exist. So, how does one go about grooming their top talent for playing an effective part in this process?

    Finally, we will also try to take a shot at some of evolving paradigms. For example, all these management thoughts are still based on the kind of outdated premise that an organization is based on 'boundaries' of operations. However, already we see that model being broken down, and the future teams look more like boundaryless entities bound with nothing but a unifying purpose that brings a bunch of volunteers together for a period of time. If our success increasing depends on such teams being able to effectively self-manage themselves, what role does leadership have to play in it, and are we getting ready for it? 

  • Liked Todd Little
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Risky Business: Real Options for Software Development

    Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Software projects are known to have challenges with estimation, uncertainty, risk, and commitment - and the most valuable projects often carry the most risk. Other industries also encounter risk and generate value by understanding and managing that risk effectively. Todd Little explores techniques used in a number of risky businesses - product development, oil and gas exploration, investment banking, medicine, weather forecasting, and gambling - and shares what those industries have done to manage uncertainty.

  • Liked Jez Humble
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Secrets of Growing an Innovation Culture

    Jez Humble
    Jez Humble
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    The fundamental problem with software methodologies is that none of them work. What's decisive is not which one you adopt, but what you do to continue to innovate around your processes. In this wide-ranging talk, I'll discuss why command-and-control leads to risk management theatre, and why this makes things riskier and more painful. I'll present the essence of innovation culture, how it works at scale, and present some tools (including the Improvement Kata) to help you think differently about how to grow great software.

  • Liked Phil Abernathy
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    The Sixth Force

    Phil Abernathy
    Phil Abernathy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Over the last 2 years, in small pockets all over the world, people have been experimenting with the use of Agile and Lean in formulating and executing corporate strategy.

    The finding will astound you and lay the foundations for what may become the next wave of ‘Agilean’ transformations, thus paving the way for vertically transformed ‘Agilean’ organisations that deliver outstanding profitability.

    The ‘Lean Startup’ mentality or ‘Management 3.0’ are tips of the iceberg in recent strategic thinking.

    This talk draws on experience and real life examples to outline how Agile and Lean, and not just Porter’s 5 forces, can be used effectively to not only formulate and execute corporate strategy but also to enable transformation throughout the organisation.

  • Liked Lyssa Adkins
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    Hiring (or Growing) the Right Agile Coach

    Lyssa Adkins
    Lyssa Adkins
    Michael Spayd
    Michael Spayd
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    There are as many types of agile coaches out there as there are flavors of ice cream.  And, their levels of leadership maturity and skill can vary just as widely.  It can leave one fretting, "What am I really getting when I bring in an agile coach?  And, how do I 'grow' my own?"  In fact, what are the "must have" skills of an agile coach and how can you tell if your coach has them?  The Agile Coach Competency Framework is one big clue to answering these questions. Over the past two years, this framework has guided the development of hundreds of agile coaches. Agile managers and champions also use it to obtain "truth in advertising" to hire the right coach at the right time.  We will explore this framework and provide lightening-talk-style case studies that showcase how it has been used in the real world.  You'll leave with ideas and actions to help you become a more savvy purveyor (and/or developer) of agile coaches.

  • Liked Venkat Kandaswamy
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    Applying Agile to a Bootstrapped Startup

    Venkat Kandaswamy
    Venkat Kandaswamy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The default state of a Start up is Failure - Chris Dixon. On 18-Sep-2008, on the day Lehman Brothers collapsed, I started developing a prototype ( which later became ApartmentADDA.com ), with an unclear picture of the problem definition, not much access to the target Users and zero funding.

    Having experienced Agile as a Developer at ThoughtWorks, I tried applying some of the agile concepts. Found it a fabulous fit - true to its promise of light in the darkness of uncertainty and imprecise problem statements.

    In this talk I will take you through my Start up Journey - the first 5 years when we were Bootstrapped - how we were able to nail the Problem Definition and find the Product Market fit and how we overcame severe resource constraints - not only in Product Development, but in other functions like Sales, Marketing and Support.

    I will make a case on how applying Agile prudently to a Bootstrapped Start up can change the Default State of a Startup - which is Failure - to that of a Success.

  • Liked Todd Little
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Risky Business: Real Options for Software Development

    Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Software projects are known to have challenges with estimation, uncertainty, risk, and commitment - and the most valuable projects often carry the most risk. Other industries also encounter risk and generate value by understanding and managing that risk effectively. Todd Little explores techniques used in a number of risky businesses - product development, oil and gas exploration, investment banking, medicine, weather forecasting, and gambling - and shares what those industries have done to manage uncertainty.

  • Liked Jez Humble
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Secrets of Growing an Innovation Culture

    Jez Humble
    Jez Humble
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    The fundamental problem with software methodologies is that none of them work. What's decisive is not which one you adopt, but what you do to continue to innovate around your processes. In this wide-ranging talk, I'll discuss why command-and-control leads to risk management theatre, and why this makes things riskier and more painful. I'll present the essence of innovation culture, how it works at scale, and present some tools (including the Improvement Kata) to help you think differently about how to grow great software.

  • Liked Bernd Schiffer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Net Promoter System for Agile Companies

    Bernd Schiffer
    Bernd Schiffer
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Customer collaboration is essential to every Agile business. To create and collaborate to keep a customer is the purpose of an organisation. But still lots of companies try to make bad profits, i.e. profits earned at the expense of customer relationships. The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a renowned open-source system which addresses and measures customer collaboration. And did you know that you not only can use it to get feedback on your products and services, but also on your employees and your personal performance?

    NPS is a perfect fit for Agile companies - and those who want to be. Most of the companies I worked with (Agile coaching, training, consulting) had not heard about it, and far less were actually using it. This really surprises me, since NPS integrates like a charm with Agile, e.g. within product development via Scrum.

    In this session I'll explain the basics of NPS, i.e. promoters and detractors, satisfied and delighted customers, bad profits (how to deal with bad feedback?) and good profits, and why and how to measure these. Several stories from companies like Apple Retail, Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and others will help to make my point. I’ll further show why NPS is a very good fit with Agile regarding products, employees, and personal performance. Dos and Don’ts regarding NPS (also from personal experience) will close this session. Related to the Don'ts, I also cover some of the negative critiques out there.

  • Liked Victoria Schiffer
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    Agile Coaching? Sure thing! What about Life Coaching in Agile Thinking?

    Victoria Schiffer
    Victoria Schiffer
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    I love being around awesome people, who build great products customers desire. 
    I love learning from and together with these amazing minds. 
    I love creating the right environment for teams to flourish. 
    I love change, and learning from new experiences. 
    I love working in Agile environments.

    How about you? 
    I bet there are some elements of this list why you're in Agile, too. And you can probably add even more elements to it.

    The Agile Manifesto states amongst others individuals and interactions, customer collaboration and responding to change.

    In our everyday life doing Agile we already respect these aspects in many ways. 
    But do we practice what we preach as best we can?

    I'd like to challenge your current way of thinking about people and processes. 
    I'd like to challenge you to focus on you, before you focus on others. 
    I'd like to challenge your current way of reflecting. 
    I'd like to inspire you to go different ways. 
    I'd like to inspire you to inspire others.

    In Agile we're already good in improving our processes and creating well performing teams and hence building the right things in the right way. And in the Agile Manifesto's communication and collaboration piece we can even get better.
    "You have not yet reached the limit of what you're capable of!" means we can always further improve. And we do follow this idea in our Agile processes, too, through continuous feedback (Retrospectives) and improvement.

    And why not take it even further? Why not go "Beyond Agile"?!

    Here's where aspects of Life Coaching come in handy: through also understanding and improving ourselves (how do we interact with people due to how we perceive our environment) we will even further improve communication and collaboration.

    Life Coaches believe our clients know the answer. And even if Agile Coaching is slightly different than Life Coaching, I see it as very relevant in Agile Coaching, too. If we apply this in Agile, instead of giving our clients (team, colleagues) the answers, asking them powerful questions to help them be more aware of what's happening at the moment, they will find their answer for it and will have a much better commitment to making the change for themselves, their teams and the company. It's not for us to TELL them what to do, but to ASK them what's going on for themselves. Here's where I see a huge chance for improvement.

    In my session I give lots of examples on how to link Life Coaching ideas to our Agile work environments. I've given the session at LAST Conference Melbourne and at the Agile Coaching Circles Meetup Melbourne. The audience was engaged and the attendees were very happy about having some new ideas on how to improve their daily work life.

    Come along to be inspired by Life Coaching and thus to benefit our Agile Thinking!

  • Liked Lyssa Adkins
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Hiring (or Growing) the Right Agile Coach

    Lyssa Adkins
    Lyssa Adkins
    Michael Spayd
    Michael Spayd
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    There are as many types of agile coaches out there as there are flavors of ice cream.  And, their levels of leadership maturity and skill can vary just as widely.  It can leave one fretting, "What am I really getting when I bring in an agile coach?  And, how do I 'grow' my own?"  In fact, what are the "must have" skills of an agile coach and how can you tell if your coach has them?  The Agile Coach Competency Framework is one big clue to answering these questions. Over the past two years, this framework has guided the development of hundreds of agile coaches. Agile managers and champions also use it to obtain "truth in advertising" to hire the right coach at the right time.  We will explore this framework and provide lightening-talk-style case studies that showcase how it has been used in the real world.  You'll leave with ideas and actions to help you become a more savvy purveyor (and/or developer) of agile coaches.

  • Liked Bernd Schiffer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Inspire Management! From Status Quo to Awesome

    Bernd Schiffer
    Bernd Schiffer
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    One of the most rewarding change opportunities for organization to create awesome workplaces exists by being innovative at the management level. Forget step-by-step explanations of management practices (you can’t copy culture!); the key to address the management level - i.e. to foster innovations at this level - is by inspirations. In order to get an awesome workplace, you have to see awesome workplaces. There are plenty of ways to inspire people, but this opportunity is often wasted during the introduction of Scrum and Kanban methods, or never reflected upon afterwards.

    In this session, I will show you several aspects of awesome workplaces. A constantly growing container for inspiring management are the Agile Management Innovations (AMI). AMIs are practices for management which lead to democracy, fairness, decentralisation, dialogue, and lot of other positive effects. These effects lead to awesome workplaces, where people are truly motivated. The idea behind inspiration is to foster creativity and innovation through a changed environment. Management practices can't be just applied; 50% of management practices depend upon the organisation's culture. That's why we call them AMInnovations.

    If you experiment with AMIs, you'll get from status quo to awesome (that is of course only when you're status quo is not already awesomeness).

    I’ll introduce the concept of AMI as well as plenty of real world examples. The goal is to inspire you twofold: I will inspire you in this session to experiment with AMIs, and AMIs will inspire the people within your organisation to achieve a better workplace.

  • Liked Phil Abernathy
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    The Sixth Force

    Phil Abernathy
    Phil Abernathy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Over the last 2 years, in small pockets all over the world, people have been experimenting with the use of Agile and Lean in formulating and executing corporate strategy.

    The finding will astound you and lay the foundations for what may become the next wave of ‘Agilean’ transformations, thus paving the way for vertically transformed ‘Agilean’ organisations that deliver outstanding profitability.

    The ‘Lean Startup’ mentality or ‘Management 3.0’ are tips of the iceberg in recent strategic thinking.

    This talk draws on experience and real life examples to outline how Agile and Lean, and not just Porter’s 5 forces, can be used effectively to not only formulate and execute corporate strategy but also to enable transformation throughout the organisation.

  • Liked Venkat Kandaswamy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Applying Agile to a Bootstrapped Startup

    Venkat Kandaswamy
    Venkat Kandaswamy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The default state of a Start up is Failure - Chris Dixon. On 18-Sep-2008, on the day Lehman Brothers collapsed, I started developing a prototype ( which later became ApartmentADDA.com ), with an unclear picture of the problem definition, not much access to the target Users and zero funding.

    Having experienced Agile as a Developer at ThoughtWorks, I tried applying some of the agile concepts. Found it a fabulous fit - true to its promise of light in the darkness of uncertainty and imprecise problem statements.

    In this talk I will take you through my Start up Journey - the first 5 years when we were Bootstrapped - how we were able to nail the Problem Definition and find the Product Market fit and how we overcame severe resource constraints - not only in Product Development, but in other functions like Sales, Marketing and Support.

    I will make a case on how applying Agile prudently to a Bootstrapped Start up can change the Default State of a Startup - which is Failure - to that of a Success.

  • Liked Naveen Nanjundappa
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    Leadership Agility - Organizational Agility - winning agile transformations

    Naveen Nanjundappa
    Naveen Nanjundappa
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    "Agile doesn't work for me, my team and my organization" have you heard or experienced this, if so this presentation gives you an insight about how leadership is responsible for driving the transformation. I shall focus on the leadership agility levels and organizational agility parameters, also I would discuss the aspects that connect the leadership style and culture. Over 90% of leaders operate at an heroic leadership level as experts and achievers, this traditional approach limits the organizational agility, innovation and productivity. Leadership agility requires a paradigm shift from a world of competition and duality to collaboration and unity. Organizational agility is a journey, learn how being a catalyst leader helps achieving organizational agility.

    “Leadership bring culture to organization and culture builds leadership agility”

  • Liked Tathagat Varma
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    Agile, Management 3.0, Holacracy...what next?

    Tathagat Varma
    Tathagat Varma
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Pesentation deck is now available at http://www.slideshare.net/Managewell/what-next-31791295

    Modern management methods are still based on the then seminal work by Henri Fayol some 200 years back, followed by Frederick Taylor's work some 100 years back! Sadly, those models were predominantly based on industrial work, and don't really work that well in knowledge industry and today's sociological dynamics at workplace. Classical Agile methods codify several people practices that allow for a self-organizing team to evolve, but doesn't offer a lot of guidance on how to develop and groom leadership for agile organizations beyond a software team. Management 3.0 takes this issue further and develops it into a separate discipline altogether. On similar lines, Holacracy seeks to create social technology for purposeful organizations, though not specially targeting software organizations. So, the issue of leadership still continues to be unresolved and rather left to pave its way on its own. Unfortunately, when we want to achieve true end-to-end agility, it is not enough for software teams to be charging at top speeds but leadership not evenly matched to support them well in their endeavors. We clearly have a problem at hand...

    In this talk, we will study how the role of leadership has evolved and what does it look like for agile organizations at present. Many agile methods take an extreme view that limit leadership to team-level collective ownership of leadership. However, that might not be enough because of various reasons. In any non-trivial organization, whether a software organizations or any modern business employing software for business advantage, the reality is that organization units beyond a plain-vanilla software teams do exist. So, how does one go about grooming their top talent for playing an effective part in this process?

    Finally, we will also try to take a shot at some of evolving paradigms. For example, all these management thoughts are still based on the kind of outdated premise that an organization is based on 'boundaries' of operations. However, already we see that model being broken down, and the future teams look more like boundaryless entities bound with nothing but a unifying purpose that brings a bunch of volunteers together for a period of time. If our success increasing depends on such teams being able to effectively self-manage themselves, what role does leadership have to play in it, and are we getting ready for it? 

  • Liked Pavel Dabrytski
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    Lean vs. Scrum

    Pavel Dabrytski
    Pavel Dabrytski
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile software development has proven to be more successful than traditional methods. However there are many Agile methodologies (Scrum, Kanban, Lean, XP). It is difficult to make a right choice.
    Do you what to know the differences between Scrum and Lean? Perhaps you struggle with your existing Scrum implementation and looking for a better methodology. So did I. I spent many hours looking for continuous improvement beyond Retrospectives and Sprint Reviews. And I found my answer in applying Lean Principles.
    This session will help you to increase your understanding of Lean and Scrum. It will also give you some practical examples of implementing Lean in Scrum teams.

  • Liked Neil Killick
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    The Guessing Game - Alternatives to Agile Estimation

    Neil Killick
    Neil Killick
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile promotes empiricism and change, yet many practitioners continue to scope out and estimate delivery times and costs for software products and projects.

    Defenders of the art of estimation claim that we need to estimate software projects in order to answer common business and customer questions such as:

    • Should we go ahead with this project? (go/no-go)
    • How much will it cost? (bottom line)
    • When will it be done? (predictability)
    • Should we do project B instead of A? (prioritisation)

    This session challenges participants to flip these questions on their heads and seek alternatives to estimation rituals. It covers the many risks inherent with an estimation culture and demonstrates real, practical alternatives, both at the portfolio and the sprint level.

  • Liked Ted Tencza
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    Creating a Great Engineering Culture in an Agile workplace.

    Ted Tencza
    Ted Tencza
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Company culture, or its DNA, is one of the most important factors to determing if a company succeeds.  Many companies claim to have great company culture.  But what does this mean, how can you know if your company has a great culture, and how can you go about improving the culture?  This talk will explore what great companies have in common, and share experiences I have had in helping to develop engineering culture during my career.    

    Will also explore how Agile principles help to foster creating the best possible culture for your organization.

  • Liked Niraj Bhandari
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    Adopting Agile - Will you end up missing the soul of your product

    Niraj Bhandari
    Niraj Bhandari
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The aim of this session is to sensitize the audience about the need to have a holistic approach to Agile product development than a blind faith approach.

    Let us take this through an example. Can you name some of the success stories of agile. I did a google search and the list comprised mainly of startups who are anyway doing quick fire work. Try searching for established players and the name which crops up is Salesforce. Facebook is another example which people are quick to point, but facebook doesn’t acknowledge using the Agile as such.

    Let us try and drill down further using these two examples. Salesforce acknowledges that it has tremendously improved the delivery of its features using agile methodologies over time. Great, but wait a point, is the promise of agile to speed execution. No, the premise of agile is to improve the quality of your deliverables and by quality I mean the value derived by a user/consumer. It helps you build the right product. Unfortunately there is no easy way to measure the value delivered by saleforce to its user through these new features.

    Let us now shift gears and look a bit more closely at facebook. Facebook releases features very frequently, almost on daily basis, sometimes even on hourly basis. They are betting big on test automation and continuation integration to ensure that new features don’t cause a breakage. They also seem to be following the agile’s premise of “fail early” by quickly pulling out features which don’t get desired traction from users. So far, it looks a great story and if you are a technical person, you are etching to work for such a company which allows you to experiment with your ideas and put them in production to get instant feedback. Now let us through an alternate perspective – what if some of the features need gestation period before people start liking them. Not every features becomes an instant hit. Remember the classical “Crossing the Chasm” technology adoption lifecycle (couldn't add the image because of editor limitations)

    Some features would need a push to cross the chasm and become successful, but if they are pulled down based on initial traction, you may be losing some of the valuable features. Another twist in tale in this case is what the user research/product management do in this scenario. Aren’t they supposed to do some upfront work to figure out which features have better chances of being accepted and focus energy on helping them cross the chasm. That leads us back to the question we started out with – In our drive to do frequent releases, putting the features out for customers to experience and try, are we missing big picture and just building the product rather than creating a product with a soul. Or is it like we should spend some time upfront to create a “soulful” product and then go full steam in building incremental features. At this point of time it may also  be useful to look at the stories coming out regarding the potential failure of Universal Credit program in UK, which supposedly used Agile but has all but abandoned it. Here are the links, which we would use to structure a discussion around exercising caution while practicing Agile as compared to just rushing into it because everybody else is doing it.

    Resources for structuring discussion around Universal Credit Discussion-

    https://www.techwell.com/2013/07/worlds-biggest-agile-development-project-collapses

    http://www.computerweekly.com/blogs/public-sector/2013/05/dwp-drops-agile-from-flagship.html

  • Liked Anand Bagmar
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    Exploring the unknown areas of Testing in Analytics

    Anand Bagmar
    Anand Bagmar
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    In the Analytics domain, I will share what I know as different facets of Analytics research and application, and its potential impacts on Testing the same.

  • Liked Neeraj Bachani
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    Influence of Japanese Samurai on Agile

    Neeraj Bachani
    Neeraj Bachani
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    How japanese culture has influenced Agile and list of Japanese terms used in Agile.

  • Liked Unmesh Joshi
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    Agile and Non-Violence : A Curious link.

    Unmesh Joshi
    Unmesh Joshi
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Several years back I was reading some articles by Vinoba Bhave about Non violent organizations. I found striking silimarity between thoughts expressed in those articles and principles of Agile.  The original article was in Marathi. I got it translated in English and discussed the similarities with several Agile leaders. They found that there indeed this similarity. 

    Reading about non violent organizations, helped me understand self-organization in Agile/Scrum a lot better than any book on Scrum or Agile. This in fact changed my understanding completely and helped me think beyond popular Agile practices like TDD, Pairing etc.

    The talk will show links between principles of Agile and Non violent organizations. 

  • Liked Mohan
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    Developing a Culture of Leadership through Lean for Organizations

    Mohan
    Mohan
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    The goal of this topic is to look at Lean from an Indian Context and what aspects are critical for  Leadership especially while implementing Lean in their Organizations. Few concepts of how Organizations wade through their challenges to implement a Pyramid of Agile Practices both in Software and Non Software will be discussed here. This will also focus heavily on how to develop a culture of Leaders within the organization using relationship techniques of Senpai(mentor) and Kohai(protege) and also of a Sensei(teacher) .