• Johannes Brodwall
    Johannes Brodwall
    Niruka Ruhunage
    Niruka Ruhunage
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    Can you maintain agile engineering practices with a distributed team?

    Johannes is the Oslo based Chief Scientist for the Sri Lanka based company Exilesoft. In order to promote agile engineering practices, he uses remote pair programming to connect with teams halfway across the world.

    In this talk, we will go through a practical approach for remote pair programming adopted for high-latency situations. We will demonstrate remote pair programming with a live example and we will discuss the advantages and usages of the approach. We will also cover the practical parts of remote pair programming, such as tools and setup.

    After seeing this talk, the audience should be able to remotely pair with members of their distributed team. They will also get a lot of tips on how to use pair programming effectively in both local and remote settings.

  • Liked Tarang Baxi
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    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Lynne Cazaly
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    The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    Lynne Cazaly
    Lynne Cazaly
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

  • Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    After more than 5 years of supporting the thetrainline.com platform, ThoughtWorks worked with The Trainline teams to transfer knowledge and context  back to the Trainline Teams.

    This methodology was co-created by ThoughtWorks and Trainline as a healthy sustainable and mature way to transfer knowledge. The transition itself was about a year long and involved multiple agile concepts around remote pairing, program MVP and above all, continuous delivery and non-disruption to business through the process.

    This presentation would take the audience through the experiences and learnings of the process. This session is co-presented by ThoughtWorks and Trainline (vendor and customer) and will provide an insight across multiple spectrums of delivery and business.

  • Liked Raja Bavani
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    A Principle-Centered Approach to Distributed Agile (OR) Distributed Agile: Ten Guiding Principles

    Raja Bavani
    Raja Bavani
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    The challenges in distributed agile can be seen under three broad categories viz., a) Communication and Coordination, b) Time Zone Differences and c) Issues related to People, Culture and Leadership Style. Successful teams consciously adhere to certain principles and it is their principle-centered approach that helps them face such challenges and deliver the best.

    Steven Covey wrote: "Principles always have natural consequences attached to them. There are positive consequences when we live in harmony with the principles. There are negative consequences when we ignore them. But because these principles apply to everyone, whether or not they are aware, this limitation is universal. And the more we know of correct principles, the greater is our personal freedom to act wisely." This is true in all situations of life and it includes application of agile methods in geographically distributed teams too.

    This session is to present the ten principles and elaborate 3-4 principles learned through experience in working with project teams and interactions with industry experts, and applied for more than a decade. These ten principles are above and beyond agile manifesto and agile principles. These are related to areas such as context-specific methodology, tools for productivity improvement, infrastructure for communication and coordination, knowledge management, focus on quality, inclusion, collaborative governance, automation, technical debt management, iteration progression and ensuring early success.

  • Liked Jim McCarthy
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    Culture Hacking: The Prospect of Magnificence

    Jim McCarthy
    Jim McCarthy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    A culture is the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that both describes and shapes a group. The unique challenges of creating software have demanded totally new types of corporate culture. In response, we have created Agile, Scrum, and XP and many other cultural disciplines. These represent the birth of culture engineering and, although significant, are primitive compared to what will follow. Jim McCarthy introduces "culture hacking," a kind of cultural engineering that focuses on protecting personal freedom, extending openness, and embodying rationality. In the near future, a system made up of shared commitments and interpersonal protocols for hosting cultural innovations is likely to become available and standardized, leading to enormous personal and collective cultural and productivity gains. Happily, these gains will be based on culturally designed nobility of purpose, and a potent and virtuous cycle will continue to emerge, whereby profit derives from ennobled behavior. This cycle will lead to an era of widespread and abundant greatness - an era of unparalleled magnificence.

  • Corey Haines
    Corey Haines
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Everyone has acronyms, mnemonics, and a list of rules to guide their everyday software design. In order to get the most out of these age-old gems, one needs to deliberately practices them. Rules are a good way to remind ourselves of these gems.

    Corey Haines emphasies his design guidelines in form of the "4 Rules of Simple Design." Attend this talk to understand the four rules and their importance in everyday programming.

  • Liked Evan Leybourn
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    Let's Kill an Agile Project

    Evan Leybourn
    Evan Leybourn
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Other talks and games will teach you how to run a successful Agile project. Only this one will teach you how to ruin an Agile project*. In this game we will break every Agile rule, disregard the manifesto and ignore common sense in the singular pursuit of failure (and fun).

    Each of you will be part of an Agile team with a dis-engaged Customer and micro-managing boss. Being Agile, there will be daily stand-ups, planning sessions, retrospectives, and kanban boards but nothing will go as you expect.

    * More importantly, this activity will teach you "how" Agile projects can fail and the reason behind many common Agile practices.

  • Liked Gopinath R
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    3Cs for Agile Project Success - Critical Success Factors & Proven Practices

    Gopinath R
    Gopinath R
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    Agile methodologies are gaining wider acceptance in Software Development and Testing due to its inherent values like Accelerate Time to Market, Eliminate Waste and flexible to adapt changes quickly. Agile practices emphasis on effective communication, collaboration and customer involvement for addressing the challenges in developing the product in dynamic business environment due to fast changing requirements. The co-location of project teams and high customer interaction throughout the project helps in achieving effective communication, team and customer collaboration.

     In an outsourced or offshore Software development, teams are geographically distributed to develop products in a collaborative and cost-effective manner by better utilization of global talents. Adopting agile methodologies helps in better ROI by developing quality products as per changing market needs in short span. Adopting Agile in global software development shall pose few challenges due to wider geographical distance, time zone differences, and cultural aspects and so on.

     

    This paper presents 3Cs – Communication, Collaboration and Customer Involvement as Critical Success Factors that need to be considered while implementing Agile for Global Software Development. It also details proven practices to address the challenges due to distributed agile software development. This paper is based on Author’s experience in executing Outsourced Product Development engagements using Distributed Agile Methodologies for co-creating Telecom products

  • Liked Arlo Belshee
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    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • Liked Kevin Austin
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    Scaling Agile Engagement

    Kevin Austin
    Kevin Austin
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    My talk is centred on doing better for our people; creating opportunities and building communities for a better life.

    I explore the actions and impact of a ground-up Agile Transition over the past 18 months, the challenges, what worked well, and how we began on a journey of connecting and growing Agile communities globally.

    A key theme discussed is our primary focus of putting the people we work with first while inspiring moments to challenge, learn, and explore new ways of thinking.

    • Scaling Agile Engagement is particularly applicable to anyone working with a large organization and/or distributed teams

     

     

  • Liked Tarang Baxi
    keyboard_arrow_down

    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Raja Bavani
    keyboard_arrow_down

    A Principle-Centered Approach to Distributed Agile (OR) Distributed Agile: Ten Guiding Principles

    Raja Bavani
    Raja Bavani
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    The challenges in distributed agile can be seen under three broad categories viz., a) Communication and Coordination, b) Time Zone Differences and c) Issues related to People, Culture and Leadership Style. Successful teams consciously adhere to certain principles and it is their principle-centered approach that helps them face such challenges and deliver the best.

    Steven Covey wrote: "Principles always have natural consequences attached to them. There are positive consequences when we live in harmony with the principles. There are negative consequences when we ignore them. But because these principles apply to everyone, whether or not they are aware, this limitation is universal. And the more we know of correct principles, the greater is our personal freedom to act wisely." This is true in all situations of life and it includes application of agile methods in geographically distributed teams too.

    This session is to present the ten principles and elaborate 3-4 principles learned through experience in working with project teams and interactions with industry experts, and applied for more than a decade. These ten principles are above and beyond agile manifesto and agile principles. These are related to areas such as context-specific methodology, tools for productivity improvement, infrastructure for communication and coordination, knowledge management, focus on quality, inclusion, collaborative governance, automation, technical debt management, iteration progression and ensuring early success.

  • Corey Haines
    Corey Haines
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Everyone has acronyms, mnemonics, and a list of rules to guide their everyday software design. In order to get the most out of these age-old gems, one needs to deliberately practices them. Rules are a good way to remind ourselves of these gems.

    Corey Haines emphasies his design guidelines in form of the "4 Rules of Simple Design." Attend this talk to understand the four rules and their importance in everyday programming.

  • Liked Pavel Dabrytski
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    Agile Anti-Patterns in Distributed Teams

    Pavel Dabrytski
    Pavel Dabrytski
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Implementing Agile is hard. You know what is even harder? Implementing Agile across distributed offshore teams.
    Due to constrains we face in our daily communication and collaboration, it is always difficult to get rid of old waterfall thinking. Sometime waterfall way even feels easier. This is where we find most of Distributed Agile Anti-Patterns.
    Agile Anti-Pattern often looks like Agile, it follows the right mechanics, but it is missing essential Agile values and principles.
    Join me for an interactive session where you will learn about 10 Agile Anti-Patterns specific to outsource and offshore development, and the ways to address them.

    Some of my favourite Anti-Patterns are:
    * Retrospective via emails
    * Scrum Master across the sea
    * Stabilisation sprint (sprint for bug fixing)

  • Liked Arlo Belshee
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • Liked Gopinath R
    keyboard_arrow_down

    3Cs for Agile Project Success - Critical Success Factors & Proven Practices

    Gopinath R
    Gopinath R
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    Agile methodologies are gaining wider acceptance in Software Development and Testing due to its inherent values like Accelerate Time to Market, Eliminate Waste and flexible to adapt changes quickly. Agile practices emphasis on effective communication, collaboration and customer involvement for addressing the challenges in developing the product in dynamic business environment due to fast changing requirements. The co-location of project teams and high customer interaction throughout the project helps in achieving effective communication, team and customer collaboration.

     In an outsourced or offshore Software development, teams are geographically distributed to develop products in a collaborative and cost-effective manner by better utilization of global talents. Adopting agile methodologies helps in better ROI by developing quality products as per changing market needs in short span. Adopting Agile in global software development shall pose few challenges due to wider geographical distance, time zone differences, and cultural aspects and so on.

     

    This paper presents 3Cs – Communication, Collaboration and Customer Involvement as Critical Success Factors that need to be considered while implementing Agile for Global Software Development. It also details proven practices to address the challenges due to distributed agile software development. This paper is based on Author’s experience in executing Outsourced Product Development engagements using Distributed Agile Methodologies for co-creating Telecom products

  • Liked Arijit Sarbagna
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Agile Offshoring: Touching the right chord

    Arijit Sarbagna
    Arijit Sarbagna
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    More often we jump in to the Agile bandwagon - bit prematurely. And mostly as we try to do so, we fall flat (well, there are exceptions of course) & jump to an off-shoring organization. The good news is, by doing so - we may have just taken the second (i.e. after deciding to go Agile) right step i.e. if we don't have the expertise in house, bringing in the talent from outside makes most sense. But we need to keep in mind; unless we ourselves are not having an open mind to embrace the changes, we are most likely to fail despite all our good intentions.

     

    Basis of this talk:

    I am working on Agile onsite-offshore model for last 10+ years (with total 15+ years in the service industry). Over these years, have dealt with numerous small (2-3 teams - all co-located) to large scale (75+ teams, spread across multiple geographical boundaries) Agile engagements & have worked as consultant to several projects. Offshoring is a big challenge - not only to our clients, but also to ourselves - as we often fight the situation, where customer is either too rigid on Agile expectations or too much bent towards traditional PM style. Bringing the right mix is always the tough ask - that is where the success of the project depends.

  • Liked Suchit Puri
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    Beyond Story Points and Velocity Graphs

    Suchit Puri
    Suchit Puri
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    Coming from a services company, for last couple of years we all have been fighting with clients over points , velocity and scope. This talk is about how to think beyond points and still create visibility to the clients and how we did this in our project ( which was a distributed agile project beased out of India and Australia )

     

     

  • Liked Kevin Austin
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Scaling Agile Engagement

    Kevin Austin
    Kevin Austin
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    My talk is centred on doing better for our people; creating opportunities and building communities for a better life.

    I explore the actions and impact of a ground-up Agile Transition over the past 18 months, the challenges, what worked well, and how we began on a journey of connecting and growing Agile communities globally.

    A key theme discussed is our primary focus of putting the people we work with first while inspiring moments to challenge, learn, and explore new ways of thinking.

    • Scaling Agile Engagement is particularly applicable to anyone working with a large organization and/or distributed teams

     

     

  • Liked Pooja Wandile
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    The different engagement models, processes, challenges and solutions for a distributed Scrum Team in an outsourced product development (OPD)

    Pooja Wandile
    Pooja Wandile
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A distributed Scrum team is a necessity than a choice in many cases. Often customers and their suppliers struggle to put up a team model that will work effectively and provide maximum value. The customer wants to be absolutely sure how the entire engagement will be executed so that there are no surprises later.

    So, what are the different ways of forming teams in a distributed environment, what is the impact on the execution, how do you execute different engagement models, what challenges do you see and so on? These are the questions the customers are interested in.

    This talk will focus on answering the above questions. We have defined 3 types of distributed team models and implemented in few of the projects in an onshore-offshore scenario. We have also tailored scrum meetings like planning, DSM, etc. so that these meetings are more effective in distributed model. While some of the changes have worked, some still needs to be enhanced further.

     

  • Liked Lynne Cazaly
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    The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    Lynne Cazaly
    Lynne Cazaly
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

  • Johannes Brodwall
    Johannes Brodwall
    Niruka Ruhunage
    Niruka Ruhunage
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    Can you maintain agile engineering practices with a distributed team?

    Johannes is the Oslo based Chief Scientist for the Sri Lanka based company Exilesoft. In order to promote agile engineering practices, he uses remote pair programming to connect with teams halfway across the world.

    In this talk, we will go through a practical approach for remote pair programming adopted for high-latency situations. We will demonstrate remote pair programming with a live example and we will discuss the advantages and usages of the approach. We will also cover the practical parts of remote pair programming, such as tools and setup.

    After seeing this talk, the audience should be able to remotely pair with members of their distributed team. They will also get a lot of tips on how to use pair programming effectively in both local and remote settings.

  • Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    After more than 5 years of supporting the thetrainline.com platform, ThoughtWorks worked with The Trainline teams to transfer knowledge and context  back to the Trainline Teams.

    This methodology was co-created by ThoughtWorks and Trainline as a healthy sustainable and mature way to transfer knowledge. The transition itself was about a year long and involved multiple agile concepts around remote pairing, program MVP and above all, continuous delivery and non-disruption to business through the process.

    This presentation would take the audience through the experiences and learnings of the process. This session is co-presented by ThoughtWorks and Trainline (vendor and customer) and will provide an insight across multiple spectrums of delivery and business.

  • Liked Jim McCarthy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Culture Hacking: The Prospect of Magnificence

    Jim McCarthy
    Jim McCarthy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    A culture is the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that both describes and shapes a group. The unique challenges of creating software have demanded totally new types of corporate culture. In response, we have created Agile, Scrum, and XP and many other cultural disciplines. These represent the birth of culture engineering and, although significant, are primitive compared to what will follow. Jim McCarthy introduces "culture hacking," a kind of cultural engineering that focuses on protecting personal freedom, extending openness, and embodying rationality. In the near future, a system made up of shared commitments and interpersonal protocols for hosting cultural innovations is likely to become available and standardized, leading to enormous personal and collective cultural and productivity gains. Happily, these gains will be based on culturally designed nobility of purpose, and a potent and virtuous cycle will continue to emerge, whereby profit derives from ennobled behavior. This cycle will lead to an era of widespread and abundant greatness - an era of unparalleled magnificence.

  • Liked Evan Leybourn
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Let's Kill an Agile Project

    Evan Leybourn
    Evan Leybourn
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Other talks and games will teach you how to run a successful Agile project. Only this one will teach you how to ruin an Agile project*. In this game we will break every Agile rule, disregard the manifesto and ignore common sense in the singular pursuit of failure (and fun).

    Each of you will be part of an Agile team with a dis-engaged Customer and micro-managing boss. Being Agile, there will be daily stand-ups, planning sessions, retrospectives, and kanban boards but nothing will go as you expect.

    * More importantly, this activity will teach you "how" Agile projects can fail and the reason behind many common Agile practices.

  • Liked Sudheer Kotagiri
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    Automation of Engineering aspects in Agile Factory Model

    Sudheer Kotagiri
    Sudheer Kotagiri
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    With Agile, every aspect of software engineering needs to be done in a quick and consistent manner. Automation is one of them and we will showcase how various engineering  aspects like Unit Testing, Functional Testing, Integration, Build and Deployments were handled in “Agile Factory Model” with large-scale, distributed teams.

  • Liked Mark Shead
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    Effective Communication With A Distributed Team

    Mark Shead
    Mark Shead
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Face-to-face communication is recognized in the Agile Principles as the best way for teams to convey information. However, not all teams can be co-located. Successful communication on distributed teams isn't just a matter of just buying the right technology. Teams with a strong communication culture will find a way to communicate well regardless of what official tools they are given. Poor communication cultures will do poorly even with state of the art tools.

    This talk is going to use specific examples to show how to enable effective communication and trust between team members distributed across different locations and timezones. While there will be some discussion of technology, the focus is on how to identify and foster a culture of communication on your team. 

     

  • Liked Johannes Brodwall
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    Kicking off agile remote teams

    Johannes Brodwall
    Johannes Brodwall
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    So your project is just getting started. Or maybe you're just about to embark on a new release. Or new members just joined the team. What now?

    In either situation, your project will have a lot of energy and attention right now. But at the same time, there's probably a lot of uncertainty about what to do first. Many projects waste this valuable time without a clear plan or purpose. In Exilesoft, we have refined activities to deal with these problems, even with the additional constraint that the team may be distributed geographically.

    In this workshop, we share a typical plan of what activities to do every day in the first weeks together with a set of activities which yeld tangible results in terms of team building, vision, architecture and a coherent working system in a minimum of time. Participants will get a chance to practice the skills as well with several interactive exercises.

  • Liked Joe Zachariah
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    Can India be truly Agile?

    Joe Zachariah
    Joe Zachariah
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    It's Indian Independence day today as I work on this proposal. As I read newspapers today, I understand the importance of the IT and ITES Offshore business, which has almost single handedly provided employment to millions of technically suave and English speaking folks. One question that repeatedly comes to surface is whether the Indian IT industry will be able to up its game from the servicing mentality which started the boom of IT in India. As Agile and Scrum began to become the flavour of the worldwide IT industry, many firms in India also went out on the Agile path, many of them out of pressure from their Western clients. Some of them were successful, but there are also numerous examples of failures of the Agile model and also half hearted adoptions, which have led Western businesses to believe that maybe India is not adept enough to take its game to the next level where teams can follow the Agile framework.

    My talk would be driven by my experiences of following Agile in different ways in my different teams over the last 6-7 years. My forays into the Agile ways of software delivery in India have been largely successful and I cannot see a reason why Agile will not work in India.

    In my talk, I would focus on the reasons on why Agile would work in India. Right from the way we approach diversity and inclusivity, to the way we approach our post election coalition party governance model, the Indian way of living is rife with finding innovative ways to quickly adapt to change, which essentially is the Agile mantra.

    I plan to start with a simple example. Of the Western way of cooking & dining as compared to the Indian way of cooking & dining. A traditional Indian kitchen is a sacred space. It is decorated with auspicious signs. Sometimes, it doubles up as a puja room. In many households, you are not allowed to enter the kitchen with footwear, you are expected to bathe before lighting the kitchen fire, you are not allowed to eat unless you have taken a bath - these can be metaphorically compared with the Ceremonies that an Agile team practising Scrum follows - the daily standups, sprint planning and reviews, etc. However the core delivery is the food. And no matter what ceremonies you follow and what your menu for the day is, the food comes out daily at the same time and is served everyday with the same set of stakeholders. There aren't as many tools and supporting equipment that you might see as in a Western kitchen, but at the end of the day the practices followed in a typical Indian kitchen are very Agile at heart.

    There are many other examples from Indian culture and mythology that one can refer to understand that Indians are essentially Agile at heart. Open source product groups, many of which are largely Agile, can also find a reference point in Indian culture and mythology. That which is timeless is referred to in the Indian context as Sanatan. It refers to wisdom that has no founder and is best described as collaborative and open source freeware. Every idea is accepted but only that which survives the test of time, space and situation eventually matters.

    There are many myths circulating in the IT industry that Agile cannot survive in India, since Indians cannot be trusted to be self governed and always require direction. Also Indians don't know how to have fun at work. Through my presentation I seek to dispel those myths drawing from Indian mythology and culture and essentially try to make folks understand that reasons for Agile not working in India is the same as Agile not working elsewhere. What you need to make Agile work at the end of the day, is just the belief that it will work.