• Harish Krishnaswamy
    Harish Krishnaswamy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    The webMethods R&D division of Software AG (wM) produces industry-leading enterprise products focused on application integration, business process integration and B2B partner integration. This division with more than 450 engineers across 7 locations in the world embarked on the journey of adopting Agile and Lean Software Development practices in 2010.

    The Pain

    The wM business line consists of about 40 Scrum teams delivering more than 30 enterprise products that constitute the webMethods suite across 7 locations in the world. Circa 2007, the suite was a loose collection of multiple products individually developed by teams, many of which were brought together by M&As. It was a hard, painful challenge to integrate and test these products as a single suite and synchronizing major releases. The teams embraced Scrum as the development model - a useful first step but still far from guaranteeing predictability, high standards of quality and productivity at the suite level.

    The Challenge

    • Align multiple, small scrum teams distributed over many locations to one Suite Backlog. Focus them on delivering an integrated Suite by modeling an assembly line from a Lean Manufacturing system. The teams develop and contribute to a single value stream with continuous flow and deliver potentially shippable Suite Build Sets in predictable intervals (4-6weeks).

    • Retain the simplicity of the ‘Agile model’. Allow teams to grow at their pace. The teams work off their individual team backlogs, the suite complexities and priority conflicts largely hidden from them. They experiment with their processes, drive their own local changes and share the learning with the other teams.

     Success:

    Since embracing Lean and Agile practices, we have delivered three successful major Suite releases on time with measured quality. The customer situation has dramatically improved with steadily decreasing customer incidents, response times and hot escalations. More than a 100,000 automated regression tests  verify the suite and we have a potentially shippable Suite build set every 4-6 weeks guaranteeing the highest standards of quality. For faster value delivery, we are now transitioning to 6-monthly releases – the first of which is due to roll out in Q4 2013.

    In this Experience report, I focus on how we aligned scrum teams operating from Germany, U.S, Bulgaria and India to a single backlog, a continuously integrated Suite and a potentially shippable single build set delivered every 4-6 weeks. We will look at the challenges we faced, custom solutions and processes that we designed to realize the Single Suite Vision.

  • Johannes Brodwall
    Johannes Brodwall
    Niruka Ruhunage
    Niruka Ruhunage
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    Can you maintain agile engineering practices with a distributed team?

    Johannes is the Oslo based Chief Scientist for the Sri Lanka based company Exilesoft. In order to promote agile engineering practices, he uses remote pair programming to connect with teams halfway across the world.

    In this talk, we will go through a practical approach for remote pair programming adopted for high-latency situations. We will demonstrate remote pair programming with a live example and we will discuss the advantages and usages of the approach. We will also cover the practical parts of remote pair programming, such as tools and setup.

    After seeing this talk, the audience should be able to remotely pair with members of their distributed team. They will also get a lot of tips on how to use pair programming effectively in both local and remote settings.

  • Liked Sudipta Lahiri
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    Capacity Planning for Dynamic Teams

    Sudipta Lahiri
    Sudipta Lahiri
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Fixed price (and fixed scope) projects dominate the offshore industry. These projects have offshore/onsite teams. They often have large team size (over 100s of people in one team).

    Agile thinking uses team velocity/ throughput and uses that to project an end date (Kanban system) or how much scope can be accomplished in a given time duration (number of sprints in SCRUM). They assume a stable team. However, this is not applicable for projects. They experience resource and productivity ramp-up issues. Often, resources keep changing as new projects come in. Projects do not have past velocity or throughput data. Extrapolating historical data from other similar projects, though possible, is inaccurate for multiple reasons.

    This talk is based on our experience of working with such project teams. They want to adopt agile methods. We show how they can adopt the Kanban Method and yet do: A) Initial Capacity Planning B) Assess the impact of scope creep to the project end date.

    The session assumes a basic understanding of the Kanban method.

  • Liked Tarang Baxi
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    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Balaji.M
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    Visualization and Agile Practices to the Rescue of Traditional Project

    Balaji.M
    Balaji.M
    Srinath Chandrasekharan
    Srinath Chandrasekharan
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    We are from Large Indian IT Services organisation where most of the projects follow traditional/waterfall ways of working and the mindset of the senior management is also used to this way of working for all project types (Application Maintenance, Minor Enhancement, Bug Fixing and L3 Analysis space), while these methods have their own shortfalls and projects suffer because of the methodology, many leaders still believe that by following tradtional process their problems would be solved. Through this experience report, we would like to share how Visualisation and Agile Practices rescued the waterfall project from depleting Customer Confidence and Quality of Service Delivery.

    The Project team of 9 members distributed at onsite and offshore was involved in maintenance / enhancement type of work for a large Investment Bank with several new features being implemented as change requests. Team’s responsibility starts from Analysis to Deployment into Production for the work comes in ad-hoc manner. The issues and challenges by project teams were

    • Longer duration to complete the change requests and ensuring an on-time delivery
    • Low Customer Satisfaction and Quality of Deliverable.
    • Proactively manage application issues despite higher experience of team.
    • Low employee morale
    • Lack of senior management participation and constant fire fighting with the customer.

    Project team focused on 3 areas

    Business/Client IT team

    • Prioritize the change requests by highest business/end user value (Input Cadence)

    • ‘Drive’ the development efforts to incrementally deliver

    Teams

    • Focused on speed in delivering change request by eliminating waste

    • Focused on enhancing knowledge sharing by Collaboration using Visualisation Boards and daily stand up meeting

    • Focus to Deliver right at First Time

    Management

    • Focus on the value stream (cycle time)

    • ‘Drive’ Continuous Improvement (Kaizen)

    • Manage impediments , making blockers visible

    Within 3 months of time after team started adopting the Visualisation and Agile practices the teams and senior management could see the improvement in the areas of 

    1. Increase in Balance Score Card scores from 4 to 6.5 and many areas scored 7.0/7.0
    2. Productivity improvement by 25%

  • Liked Lynne Cazaly
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    The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    Lynne Cazaly
    Lynne Cazaly
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

  • Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    After more than 5 years of supporting the thetrainline.com platform, ThoughtWorks worked with The Trainline teams to transfer knowledge and context  back to the Trainline Teams.

    This methodology was co-created by ThoughtWorks and Trainline as a healthy sustainable and mature way to transfer knowledge. The transition itself was about a year long and involved multiple agile concepts around remote pairing, program MVP and above all, continuous delivery and non-disruption to business through the process.

    This presentation would take the audience through the experiences and learnings of the process. This session is co-presented by ThoughtWorks and Trainline (vendor and customer) and will provide an insight across multiple spectrums of delivery and business.

  • Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Intermediate

    A major challenge in agile development is the ability of test teams to keep pace with ongoing development while simultaneously ensuring that new development has not created regression failures. This case study from Halliburton shows how together with two globally distributed outsourcing partners they developed a comprehensive test automation strategy for their agile teams that effectively leveraged both in house and outsourced activities. This approach resulted in a significant quality improvement from prior releases.

  • Liked Mikael Gislen
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    Mitigating clashing paradigms between Agile Development and ISO 9000

    Mikael Gislen
    Mikael Gislen
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There are, on a philosophical level, significant clashes between the agile paradigm and Quality Systems such as ISO 9000 or CMM/CMMi, this is already presented in the Agile Manifesto. Agile Development is based on what I would call post-modern paradigms when compared to the plan-driven and early iterative development methodologies which are based on a positivist paradigm.

    The underlying philosophical challenges cannot be easily mitigated. But a purist agile paradigm may tend to stress a positivist paradigm as well and this can be dangerous since then agile would not be agile any longer.

    While it may not be possible to completely remove the challenges between agile and quality systems, it is possible to learn to live with some tension between different paradigms. 

    There are some obvious areas of conflict, for examplethe Agile methodologies strongly discourages unnecessary documentation, and questions that it is possible to provide all requirements up-front. ISO 9000 on the other hand demands requirements up-front and documented evidence of almost anything, but such practical aspects can actually be mitigated with relative ease. Other aspects may demand much more effort. In particular the internal auditing process is problematic and other means of ensuring compliance may have to be considered.

    We have in my company systematically piloted a number of organisational changes in order to better support agile development. We have done this within the overall framework of our ISO 9000 system which is used a structure anda a gatekeeper. To do this we have used Action Research, which in it self is a kind of agile methodology, although of much older date than agile development.

    I will in my talk focus on the practical experiences we have had of building an organisational framework for agile development and while doing that suggesting a few means to mitigate the challenges mentioned initialy.

  • Liked Raja Bavani
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    A Principle-Centered Approach to Distributed Agile (OR) Distributed Agile: Ten Guiding Principles

    Raja Bavani
    Raja Bavani
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    The challenges in distributed agile can be seen under three broad categories viz., a) Communication and Coordination, b) Time Zone Differences and c) Issues related to People, Culture and Leadership Style. Successful teams consciously adhere to certain principles and it is their principle-centered approach that helps them face such challenges and deliver the best.

    Steven Covey wrote: "Principles always have natural consequences attached to them. There are positive consequences when we live in harmony with the principles. There are negative consequences when we ignore them. But because these principles apply to everyone, whether or not they are aware, this limitation is universal. And the more we know of correct principles, the greater is our personal freedom to act wisely." This is true in all situations of life and it includes application of agile methods in geographically distributed teams too.

    This session is to present the ten principles and elaborate 3-4 principles learned through experience in working with project teams and interactions with industry experts, and applied for more than a decade. These ten principles are above and beyond agile manifesto and agile principles. These are related to areas such as context-specific methodology, tools for productivity improvement, infrastructure for communication and coordination, knowledge management, focus on quality, inclusion, collaborative governance, automation, technical debt management, iteration progression and ensuring early success.

  • Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    As the popularity of Agile methods have grown, so have the misconceptions or myths associated with Agile also grown. These myths get even more glorified when we talk about them in the offshore or distributed context. And to make matters worse, you can throw in a fixed-price contract spanner into the engine.

    Worry not! In this fun-filled activity, we'll collect facts from the participants that they believe are true and then we'll declare them as confirmed or busted after an interactive (heated) discussion.

  • Liked Ravi Kumar
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    Evolutionary Approach for Maturing Agile Adoption in IT Services

    Ravi Kumar
    Ravi Kumar
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Change is a necessity and fact of organization sustenance and survival. Some changes are quite disruptive while others evolve gradually. Agile when compared to the many of the other models is radical and requires some fundamental shifts both in culture and traditional management practices. The Indian IT Services industry is at the crossroads of change with a heavy influx of agile projects in the recent past. Effective change in the context of agile with a heavy baggage from the past makes it harder. Business still has to continue and projects must be executed; so how do we go about an effective agile adoption/transition.

    This talk will try and look into the complexity and inhibitors of successful agile adoption in a typical large IT Services organization and questions the viability of certain agile methods such as Scrum and XP. We will explore why evolutionary methods such as Lean/Kanban are better fit and the necessity for evolutionary software development such as emergent design as a core premise for delivering Professional Software Development Services. Finally we also challenge the current status quo that is detrimental to a meaningful agile adoption and suggest few positive changes with Agile IT Services Manifesto.

  • Liked Abhilash Chandran
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    Retrospectives with large projects and (or) multiple teams

    Abhilash Chandran
    Abhilash Chandran
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Retrospectives are the one of the most integral components of any agile methodology.  In scrum a retrospective is typically done after each sprint. This process is simple if team is small or only one team is working on a product. The problem starts increasing exponentially when many teams work on a single product. All the teams have ideas to improve the process and production.  One team may have an entire opposite idea of another. How to bridge this gap?

    Last project executed across different teams (onsite & offshore) and different departments was not a great success. How to learn from the past failures and apply it to future projects?

    In this discussion, I will be talking about some the points which can be easily followed in such scenarios. 

    Why did we did this?

    Normally in a scrum environment we have a single team with Product Owner; they do the retrospectives within team. Team identifies the issues and work on them. Many team falls into this category. It is pretty simple

    Let’s complicate this further.

    • A big product with 10 scrum team
    • Each Team has different PO

    Apart from these main stake holders there are many others who are interested in the success of this application

    • Sales team
    • Documentation team
    • UI design team
    • Architecture and performance team

    In such a scenario, a retrospective at team level will be effective only at granular level. But it leaves a gap in few areas; it helps to bring all the teams together for one big retrospective

    • Apply the improvements made at each team level to the whole program
    • A team's retro action item against the process followed by another team can be discussed at a higher level to find an optimal solution
    • Sometimes two team's retrospective action items may be contradictory. This gathering may point a third solution
    • Sr Product owners and manager will get all the teams together. A common focus and improvement plan can be shared across teams.
    •  All team gets to know about the key concerns at the program level and with other teams.
    • Ultimately it gave a feeling of one big family.

    My experience

    Last large retro organized in our group was a big success. The sales team & architecture team had many ley lessons to take back from this meeting.  Many issues were bought out which could have been solved with better co-ordination across team.  Concrete action plans were made by team for the subsequent release.  Some of the key findings were shared across other program teams also.

  • Liked Vinodhini
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    Robotic Warehouses, Alien Domain, Offshore developers, Visionary customer : Saved by agile

    Vinodhini
    Vinodhini
    Thushara Wijewardena
    Thushara Wijewardena
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Here is a case study of how agile outsourcing can be practically applied even when the business domain is very complex and alien to offshore teams.
    The example is a project in which Exilesoft provided for a leading Norwegian producer of Robotic warehousing solutions. The project involved transforming their legacy application, produced using multiple suppliers and methods, into a newly cast application solution. This project also had its own share of typical challenges.

    • Lacked definitive and reliable documentation,
    • Domain knowledge was limited to a few very busy individuals,
    • Development and redeployment could not interrupt attention to current customers,
    • Complexity was high and design was fragmented, and
    • Focus heavily invested on current product and customer support

    These limitations along with the lack of understanding of agile methods strongly suggested the use of a method adaptive in nature, and not heavily vested in large inflexible legacy elements.
    We commenced the engagement with two pivotal elements; client awareness (agile orientation) and a roadmap of committed involvement. To lay credibility this had to be backed up with proven result delivery in the very early stages. It allowed for flexible adaption, and the creation of an atmosphere that fostered client interest.

    During this session, we will take the audience through a small video clipping of such a warehouse. We will elaborate how the customer and offshore developers worked together using agile in a highly integrated team collaboration model to achieve success within a very short time frame.

    The session will cover the following key areas:

    How such projects can be initiated

    - What type of team model and contract type we used

    - How we did the agile transformation with the customer

    - How the roles were assigned between offshore and onshore team members

    - To improve remote collaboration the tools and techniques we used

    - Techniues learned to get teams up to speed with the new domain

    - As we go along, the process changes we identified and implemented to make things work better.

    - Agile engineering practices and team dynamics that helps in such situations

  • Liked Andrea Heck
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    Distributed Product Owner Team for an Agile Medical Development

    Andrea Heck
    Andrea Heck
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Advanced

    We are developing medical imaging and workflow software in an agile way with development teams distributed to several countries. One of the major challenges is how to set up and communicate within the Product Owner team. There we have to deal with the distribution, e.g., have the Product Owner either onsite with her peers or with her Scrum team, travelling, or with proxy. We need people who are good in two different fields of knowledge: medical and software development. As a third issues, the environment of the customers may be different in different countries.

    We have ramped up local Product Owners in different countries, have found local collaboration customers, and have developed a set of communication channels and workshops how to synchronize Product Owners in the team, share a common vision and backlog with their Scrum teams, and collaborate with customers locally and globally.

  • Liked Ram Ramalingam
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    The secret shortcuts to Agile... (that won't get you there)

    Ram Ramalingam
    Ram Ramalingam
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    This is an exploratory talk, based, first, on some recent insights from cognitive science, behavioural economics (which have enriched Agile folklore already) and then on, some interesting twists from culture based research in sociology and psychology. While the former will be useful in understanding the common pitfalls encountered in a scaled Agile implementation, the latter, maybe useful in understanding the unexpected twists when doing scaled agile in a distributed/off-shore environment that have different cultural norms.

    While the anti-patterns and anti-paths are common across the world, the solution to these does differ. The assumptions behind what leads to a motivated, self-organizing, self-directing team will determine how to bring about a nuanced mindset to Agility, and understanding that what works in the West may not work in India (and other similar higher Power-Distance-Index countries).

    While sharing my experiences in a large scale Agile transformation and working with different cultures, I hope to bring out some subtle variations that could be useful in coaching and working with and transforming Agile teams in an offshore engagement.

  • Liked Jim McCarthy
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    Culture Hacking: The Prospect of Magnificence

    Jim McCarthy
    Jim McCarthy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    A culture is the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that both describes and shapes a group. The unique challenges of creating software have demanded totally new types of corporate culture. In response, we have created Agile, Scrum, and XP and many other cultural disciplines. These represent the birth of culture engineering and, although significant, are primitive compared to what will follow. Jim McCarthy introduces "culture hacking," a kind of cultural engineering that focuses on protecting personal freedom, extending openness, and embodying rationality. In the near future, a system made up of shared commitments and interpersonal protocols for hosting cultural innovations is likely to become available and standardized, leading to enormous personal and collective cultural and productivity gains. Happily, these gains will be based on culturally designed nobility of purpose, and a potent and virtuous cycle will continue to emerge, whereby profit derives from ennobled behavior. This cycle will lead to an era of widespread and abundant greatness - an era of unparalleled magnificence.

  • Liked Balaji Ganesh N
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    Using Lean in Application Development to achieve competitive advantage and customer delight

    Balaji Ganesh N
    Balaji Ganesh N
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Executing add-on Application Development (AD) projects end to end is quite challenging. More so, if the same is executed under risk-reward model. According to an IBM study, only 40% of projects meet schedule, budget and quality goals. 20 to 25 percent don’t provide ROI and up to 50 percent require material rework. 

    With competitive pricing and cut throat competition eroding margins and denting market share, cost of delivery reduction with best in class quality has become an imperative for any service company in the IT outsourcing space.

    This case study shares the experience of an AD project (team size 40) in the Insurance domain completed over a period of 9 months (including warranty phase), with a geographic spread across 4 different locations. The team had end to end responsibility right from requirements gathering to System Integration Testing. The add-on functionality developed was rolled out to 5 states spanning 2 different releases. The team leveraged LEAN Six Sigma techniques (DSM, OA, Visual Controls, Mistake Proofing) for culture building, effective change management, early feedback, rework reduction through effective in-process defect reduction and doing things right the first time, resulting in increased customer goodwill, reward payments, enhanced business and high employee satisfaction. The project was flawlessly executed under the risk reward model with best in class quality, maintainability and scalability within the specified schedule.

  • Corey Haines
    Corey Haines
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Everyone has acronyms, mnemonics, and a list of rules to guide their everyday software design. In order to get the most out of these age-old gems, one needs to deliberately practices them. Rules are a good way to remind ourselves of these gems.

    Corey Haines emphasies his design guidelines in form of the "4 Rules of Simple Design." Attend this talk to understand the four rules and their importance in everyday programming.

  • Ebin John
    Ebin John
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    This is a talk about how to identify and differentiate between Transformation and Adoption. Many change agents and companies are using this term interchangeably. This talk is a sincere effort to bring out the subtle difference between the two.

    We will also discuss about some advantages and disadvantageous of Adoption and Transformation. We will also look at some criteria to select a suitable model that can work for you. The discussion will be mainly based on Schneider model and impact of organization culture on change management.

    I would like to share the way we have changed our transformation pattern after learning about the impact of the culture. Will discuss about the best practices as well as challenges we face now.

  • Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    As the popularity of Agile methods have grown, so have the misconceptions or myths associated with Agile also grown. These myths get even more glorified when we talk about them in the offshore or distributed context. And to make matters worse, you can throw in a fixed-price contract spanner into the engine.

    Worry not! In this fun-filled activity, we'll collect facts from the participants that they believe are true and then we'll declare them as confirmed or busted after an interactive (heated) discussion.

  • Liked Ravi Kumar
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    Evolutionary Approach for Maturing Agile Adoption in IT Services

    Ravi Kumar
    Ravi Kumar
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Change is a necessity and fact of organization sustenance and survival. Some changes are quite disruptive while others evolve gradually. Agile when compared to the many of the other models is radical and requires some fundamental shifts both in culture and traditional management practices. The Indian IT Services industry is at the crossroads of change with a heavy influx of agile projects in the recent past. Effective change in the context of agile with a heavy baggage from the past makes it harder. Business still has to continue and projects must be executed; so how do we go about an effective agile adoption/transition.

    This talk will try and look into the complexity and inhibitors of successful agile adoption in a typical large IT Services organization and questions the viability of certain agile methods such as Scrum and XP. We will explore why evolutionary methods such as Lean/Kanban are better fit and the necessity for evolutionary software development such as emergent design as a core premise for delivering Professional Software Development Services. Finally we also challenge the current status quo that is detrimental to a meaningful agile adoption and suggest few positive changes with Agile IT Services Manifesto.

  • Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Intermediate

    A major challenge in agile development is the ability of test teams to keep pace with ongoing development while simultaneously ensuring that new development has not created regression failures. This case study from Halliburton shows how together with two globally distributed outsourcing partners they developed a comprehensive test automation strategy for their agile teams that effectively leveraged both in house and outsourced activities. This approach resulted in a significant quality improvement from prior releases.

  • Liked Tarang Baxi
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    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Raja Bavani
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    A Principle-Centered Approach to Distributed Agile (OR) Distributed Agile: Ten Guiding Principles

    Raja Bavani
    Raja Bavani
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    The challenges in distributed agile can be seen under three broad categories viz., a) Communication and Coordination, b) Time Zone Differences and c) Issues related to People, Culture and Leadership Style. Successful teams consciously adhere to certain principles and it is their principle-centered approach that helps them face such challenges and deliver the best.

    Steven Covey wrote: "Principles always have natural consequences attached to them. There are positive consequences when we live in harmony with the principles. There are negative consequences when we ignore them. But because these principles apply to everyone, whether or not they are aware, this limitation is universal. And the more we know of correct principles, the greater is our personal freedom to act wisely." This is true in all situations of life and it includes application of agile methods in geographically distributed teams too.

    This session is to present the ten principles and elaborate 3-4 principles learned through experience in working with project teams and interactions with industry experts, and applied for more than a decade. These ten principles are above and beyond agile manifesto and agile principles. These are related to areas such as context-specific methodology, tools for productivity improvement, infrastructure for communication and coordination, knowledge management, focus on quality, inclusion, collaborative governance, automation, technical debt management, iteration progression and ensuring early success.

  • Corey Haines
    Corey Haines
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Everyone has acronyms, mnemonics, and a list of rules to guide their everyday software design. In order to get the most out of these age-old gems, one needs to deliberately practices them. Rules are a good way to remind ourselves of these gems.

    Corey Haines emphasies his design guidelines in form of the "4 Rules of Simple Design." Attend this talk to understand the four rules and their importance in everyday programming.

  • Liked Chad Wathington
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    The Broken State of Process Improvement in Software Development

    Chad Wathington
    Chad Wathington
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Experimentation and the scientific method are very valuable for validating business opportunities. The Lean Startup and Lean UX are driving new thought patterns in the software development world. However, despite all the new thinking on product, rarely do organizations apply these techniques to their processes, opting for inefficiently adding more steps ad nauseum until productivity has ground to a halt. We’ll cover the following topics:

    • What are processes, and why do we need them
    • How processes affect delivery and productivity
    • Scale and process inefficiency
    • Process experimentation techniques
    • Designing productive processes
  • Liked Abhilash Chandran
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    Retrospectives with large projects and (or) multiple teams

    Abhilash Chandran
    Abhilash Chandran
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Retrospectives are the one of the most integral components of any agile methodology.  In scrum a retrospective is typically done after each sprint. This process is simple if team is small or only one team is working on a product. The problem starts increasing exponentially when many teams work on a single product. All the teams have ideas to improve the process and production.  One team may have an entire opposite idea of another. How to bridge this gap?

    Last project executed across different teams (onsite & offshore) and different departments was not a great success. How to learn from the past failures and apply it to future projects?

    In this discussion, I will be talking about some the points which can be easily followed in such scenarios. 

    Why did we did this?

    Normally in a scrum environment we have a single team with Product Owner; they do the retrospectives within team. Team identifies the issues and work on them. Many team falls into this category. It is pretty simple

    Let’s complicate this further.

    • A big product with 10 scrum team
    • Each Team has different PO

    Apart from these main stake holders there are many others who are interested in the success of this application

    • Sales team
    • Documentation team
    • UI design team
    • Architecture and performance team

    In such a scenario, a retrospective at team level will be effective only at granular level. But it leaves a gap in few areas; it helps to bring all the teams together for one big retrospective

    • Apply the improvements made at each team level to the whole program
    • A team's retro action item against the process followed by another team can be discussed at a higher level to find an optimal solution
    • Sometimes two team's retrospective action items may be contradictory. This gathering may point a third solution
    • Sr Product owners and manager will get all the teams together. A common focus and improvement plan can be shared across teams.
    •  All team gets to know about the key concerns at the program level and with other teams.
    • Ultimately it gave a feeling of one big family.

    My experience

    Last large retro organized in our group was a big success. The sales team & architecture team had many ley lessons to take back from this meeting.  Many issues were bought out which could have been solved with better co-ordination across team.  Concrete action plans were made by team for the subsequent release.  Some of the key findings were shared across other program teams also.

  • Liked Pavel Dabrytski
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    Agile Anti-Patterns in Distributed Teams

    Pavel Dabrytski
    Pavel Dabrytski
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Implementing Agile is hard. You know what is even harder? Implementing Agile across distributed offshore teams.
    Due to constrains we face in our daily communication and collaboration, it is always difficult to get rid of old waterfall thinking. Sometime waterfall way even feels easier. This is where we find most of Distributed Agile Anti-Patterns.
    Agile Anti-Pattern often looks like Agile, it follows the right mechanics, but it is missing essential Agile values and principles.
    Join me for an interactive session where you will learn about 10 Agile Anti-Patterns specific to outsource and offshore development, and the ways to address them.

    Some of my favourite Anti-Patterns are:
    * Retrospective via emails
    * Scrum Master across the sea
    * Stabilisation sprint (sprint for bug fixing)

  • Liked Arlo Belshee
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    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • Liked Caleb Brown
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    A Distributed Scrum Challenge: How We Turned Certain Failure into Success

    Caleb Brown
    Caleb Brown
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    What happens to a software product when its development is moved from Seattle to Chennai, its team is cut down to four people, and it is given to a first-time product owner located on the other side of the world from his team? Against the odds, and using Scrum and Agility, Nithya Thirugnanasundaram and Caleb Brown not only rose to the challenge, they doubled product sales and increased the renewal rate from 47% to 92%. In this experience report, you will learn the specific practices Nithya and Caleb used to overcome challenges such as communication, quality, tasking, interruptions – and never having met face-to-face. You will leave understanding the Agile practices that led this team to success, including having a strong commitment to practicing Scrum, being able to see completed work, and reviewing the UATs, as well as the vital roles played by the Scrum Master and Product Owner. 

  • Liked Gopinath R
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    3Cs for Agile Project Success - Critical Success Factors & Proven Practices

    Gopinath R
    Gopinath R
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    Agile methodologies are gaining wider acceptance in Software Development and Testing due to its inherent values like Accelerate Time to Market, Eliminate Waste and flexible to adapt changes quickly. Agile practices emphasis on effective communication, collaboration and customer involvement for addressing the challenges in developing the product in dynamic business environment due to fast changing requirements. The co-location of project teams and high customer interaction throughout the project helps in achieving effective communication, team and customer collaboration.

     In an outsourced or offshore Software development, teams are geographically distributed to develop products in a collaborative and cost-effective manner by better utilization of global talents. Adopting agile methodologies helps in better ROI by developing quality products as per changing market needs in short span. Adopting Agile in global software development shall pose few challenges due to wider geographical distance, time zone differences, and cultural aspects and so on.

     

    This paper presents 3Cs – Communication, Collaboration and Customer Involvement as Critical Success Factors that need to be considered while implementing Agile for Global Software Development. It also details proven practices to address the challenges due to distributed agile software development. This paper is based on Author’s experience in executing Outsourced Product Development engagements using Distributed Agile Methodologies for co-creating Telecom products

  • Liked Arijit Sarbagna
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    Reading the pulse of an offshore Project - what to look for?

    Arijit Sarbagna
    Arijit Sarbagna
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Have you been thorough the process of outsourcing your Agile project to an offshore service provider? If yes - you must have wondered how you should be measuring the progress & success of the work that is getting carried out by your service provider. But what could be the measuring criteria? How do you know if you are heading the right direction or not?

    In this session we look in to the aspects of identifying how one may successfully measure the state of an ongoing delivery model & based on it, how we refine/improve the outcome.

    Backdrop:

    Over the last 10 years while working in onsite-offshore model, what I have personally come across is the fact - whenever we work on Agile, we do come across one magic phrase every now & then - "I have also worked on Agile". Yes, we all have! :) Agile is simple & there is no rocket science in doing so while delivering across onsite & offshore. We all know the drill i.e. set up some time zone overlaps, establish virtual communication channels, identify some Proxy POs, have some kind of "all hands" infrequently & we should be good. Isn't it?

    We all know these (at least we all claim so)! But then why is it that some of the projects do better than the rest & some even fail? Why is this that we don't realize that if you offshore your work in Kolkata, you deal with a different cultural barrier than if you offshore the work at Bangalore (or vice versa)? Did we ever consider that it is upon us - the so called Agilists - to bring up the Agile knowhow to our clients (& many a times - learn from clients as well)? These are the simple - yet mostly unnoticed elements - which play a crucial role in deciding how a project succeeds in Agile offshoring & we should be able to take them in to consideration.

  • Liked Arijit Sarbagna
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    Agile Offshoring: Touching the right chord

    Arijit Sarbagna
    Arijit Sarbagna
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    More often we jump in to the Agile bandwagon - bit prematurely. And mostly as we try to do so, we fall flat (well, there are exceptions of course) & jump to an off-shoring organization. The good news is, by doing so - we may have just taken the second (i.e. after deciding to go Agile) right step i.e. if we don't have the expertise in house, bringing in the talent from outside makes most sense. But we need to keep in mind; unless we ourselves are not having an open mind to embrace the changes, we are most likely to fail despite all our good intentions.

     

    Basis of this talk:

    I am working on Agile onsite-offshore model for last 10+ years (with total 15+ years in the service industry). Over these years, have dealt with numerous small (2-3 teams - all co-located) to large scale (75+ teams, spread across multiple geographical boundaries) Agile engagements & have worked as consultant to several projects. Offshoring is a big challenge - not only to our clients, but also to ourselves - as we often fight the situation, where customer is either too rigid on Agile expectations or too much bent towards traditional PM style. Bringing the right mix is always the tough ask - that is where the success of the project depends.

  • Liked Joseph V
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    Tale of an Off-shore Agile Scrum Implementation

    Joseph V
    Joseph V
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Couple of years ago our business unit engaged a vendor in India  to do some software development for us.  Since we are agile scrum based organization, we are seeking a vendor who has exposure to agile. We identified and signed up with a vendor to start the process. It was a ride filled lot of excitement and challenges. Finally we are able to land safely.

  • Liked Dinesh Sharma
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    Trust and Committment, a two point mantra for a successful agile projects in offshore

    Dinesh Sharma
    Dinesh Sharma
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile projects success (or failure) depends on two key points in an offshore setuo i.e. Trust and Commitment. Lack of either can cause serious trouble in agile projects as they say "You can't solve people problems with policies". So a lack of Trust on each other (Customer and Supplier) leads to rigid, complicated, lengthy SLA driven contracts and both side fight over it by taking oath of 'the contract'. Trust comes from knowing each other well and it takes some serious commitment to build trust. Committment from Customer should be is to treat its supplier more as partner or equal stakeholder in the project and invest in making a strong, trustworthy relationship early in the project to build a long lasting bond. Also, equally from a supplier committment is to understand its Customer challenge and help them to achieve their business goals. A committed supplier will invest in its people to produce a best quality product for its Customer and be transparent with their (and customer) organisation culture and its challenges and openly discuss how to overcome those. A bond based on Trust and Commitment goes a long way and bring a very healthy environment for people working in that environment.

  • Liked Maris  Prabhakaran
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    Unity in diversity - ScrumMaster/AgileCoach in Indian IT service company

    Maris  Prabhakaran
    Maris Prabhakaran
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    India is culturally, linguistically and ethnically diverse culture and it is an amalgamation
    of these diverse sub-cultures.IT service companies having offices in diverse culture
    in India (Delhi,Chennai,Bangalore,Hyderabad,Cochin,Pune) have multicultural Challenges for
    Agile coach/Scrum master.

    + Distributed global team and client culture also added with challeging complex environment.

    What are the challenges faced in IT service companies by scrum master and Coach?

    How smart the Scrum Master/Coach have to be,to coach and train the team for the different
    cultural context.

    Will share Different technique and methods used to motivate the team for multicultural team.

    This session will provide challenges and  the sussessful technique implemented in Indian IT services industry  will be shared.

  • Liked Chandan
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    Agile kills Quality? Innovation? but Speed

    Chandan
    Chandan
    schedule 3 years ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Agile software process helping organization to speed of delivery(Execution Speed) with right solution but how about quality and creativity?

    my Business managers says - "We need to come up with a product in shorter cycle time?time to market has to reduce "

    Some group has decided that many features simply must appear in the next cycle, even though they are conflicting or there is a real resource problem, be it human or machine.Strong personalities are pushing for everything right now, and there seems to be no way around having to deliver it even though these requirements were just delivered and the true scope is not known.

    This situation are common and freqent in the organization.
    Team members are working on sprint after sprint and producing work product.How much time team is focusing for refactoring about the product and its quality.


    With distributed agile team, developers are scattered geographically, separate location and test team are from India ,how to resolve quality problem? with the "follow sun" concept in development process for faster to market the product how to resolve quality issue? how much time team is able to spend on creative and innovative solution when who team focusing is on speed of execution?

  • Liked Suchit Puri
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    Beyond Story Points and Velocity Graphs

    Suchit Puri
    Suchit Puri
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    Coming from a services company, for last couple of years we all have been fighting with clients over points , velocity and scope. This talk is about how to think beyond points and still create visibility to the clients and how we did this in our project ( which was a distributed agile project beased out of India and Australia )

     

     

  • Liked Kevin Austin
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    Scaling Agile Engagement

    Kevin Austin
    Kevin Austin
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    My talk is centred on doing better for our people; creating opportunities and building communities for a better life.

    I explore the actions and impact of a ground-up Agile Transition over the past 18 months, the challenges, what worked well, and how we began on a journey of connecting and growing Agile communities globally.

    A key theme discussed is our primary focus of putting the people we work with first while inspiring moments to challenge, learn, and explore new ways of thinking.

    • Scaling Agile Engagement is particularly applicable to anyone working with a large organization and/or distributed teams

     

     

  • Liked Balaji.M
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    Visualization and Agile Practices to the Rescue of Traditional Project

    Balaji.M
    Balaji.M
    Srinath Chandrasekharan
    Srinath Chandrasekharan
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    We are from Large Indian IT Services organisation where most of the projects follow traditional/waterfall ways of working and the mindset of the senior management is also used to this way of working for all project types (Application Maintenance, Minor Enhancement, Bug Fixing and L3 Analysis space), while these methods have their own shortfalls and projects suffer because of the methodology, many leaders still believe that by following tradtional process their problems would be solved. Through this experience report, we would like to share how Visualisation and Agile Practices rescued the waterfall project from depleting Customer Confidence and Quality of Service Delivery.

    The Project team of 9 members distributed at onsite and offshore was involved in maintenance / enhancement type of work for a large Investment Bank with several new features being implemented as change requests. Team’s responsibility starts from Analysis to Deployment into Production for the work comes in ad-hoc manner. The issues and challenges by project teams were

    • Longer duration to complete the change requests and ensuring an on-time delivery
    • Low Customer Satisfaction and Quality of Deliverable.
    • Proactively manage application issues despite higher experience of team.
    • Low employee morale
    • Lack of senior management participation and constant fire fighting with the customer.

    Project team focused on 3 areas

    Business/Client IT team

    • Prioritize the change requests by highest business/end user value (Input Cadence)

    • ‘Drive’ the development efforts to incrementally deliver

    Teams

    • Focused on speed in delivering change request by eliminating waste

    • Focused on enhancing knowledge sharing by Collaboration using Visualisation Boards and daily stand up meeting

    • Focus to Deliver right at First Time

    Management

    • Focus on the value stream (cycle time)

    • ‘Drive’ Continuous Improvement (Kaizen)

    • Manage impediments , making blockers visible

    Within 3 months of time after team started adopting the Visualisation and Agile practices the teams and senior management could see the improvement in the areas of 

    1. Increase in Balance Score Card scores from 4 to 6.5 and many areas scored 7.0/7.0
    2. Productivity improvement by 25%

  • Liked Lynne Cazaly
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    The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    Lynne Cazaly
    Lynne Cazaly
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

  • Johannes Brodwall
    Johannes Brodwall
    Niruka Ruhunage
    Niruka Ruhunage
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    Can you maintain agile engineering practices with a distributed team?

    Johannes is the Oslo based Chief Scientist for the Sri Lanka based company Exilesoft. In order to promote agile engineering practices, he uses remote pair programming to connect with teams halfway across the world.

    In this talk, we will go through a practical approach for remote pair programming adopted for high-latency situations. We will demonstrate remote pair programming with a live example and we will discuss the advantages and usages of the approach. We will also cover the practical parts of remote pair programming, such as tools and setup.

    After seeing this talk, the audience should be able to remotely pair with members of their distributed team. They will also get a lot of tips on how to use pair programming effectively in both local and remote settings.

  • Harish Krishnaswamy
    Harish Krishnaswamy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    The webMethods R&D division of Software AG (wM) produces industry-leading enterprise products focused on application integration, business process integration and B2B partner integration. This division with more than 450 engineers across 7 locations in the world embarked on the journey of adopting Agile and Lean Software Development practices in 2010.

    The Pain

    The wM business line consists of about 40 Scrum teams delivering more than 30 enterprise products that constitute the webMethods suite across 7 locations in the world. Circa 2007, the suite was a loose collection of multiple products individually developed by teams, many of which were brought together by M&As. It was a hard, painful challenge to integrate and test these products as a single suite and synchronizing major releases. The teams embraced Scrum as the development model - a useful first step but still far from guaranteeing predictability, high standards of quality and productivity at the suite level.

    The Challenge

    • Align multiple, small scrum teams distributed over many locations to one Suite Backlog. Focus them on delivering an integrated Suite by modeling an assembly line from a Lean Manufacturing system. The teams develop and contribute to a single value stream with continuous flow and deliver potentially shippable Suite Build Sets in predictable intervals (4-6weeks).

    • Retain the simplicity of the ‘Agile model’. Allow teams to grow at their pace. The teams work off their individual team backlogs, the suite complexities and priority conflicts largely hidden from them. They experiment with their processes, drive their own local changes and share the learning with the other teams.

     Success:

    Since embracing Lean and Agile practices, we have delivered three successful major Suite releases on time with measured quality. The customer situation has dramatically improved with steadily decreasing customer incidents, response times and hot escalations. More than a 100,000 automated regression tests  verify the suite and we have a potentially shippable Suite build set every 4-6 weeks guaranteeing the highest standards of quality. For faster value delivery, we are now transitioning to 6-monthly releases – the first of which is due to roll out in Q4 2013.

    In this Experience report, I focus on how we aligned scrum teams operating from Germany, U.S, Bulgaria and India to a single backlog, a continuously integrated Suite and a potentially shippable single build set delivered every 4-6 weeks. We will look at the challenges we faced, custom solutions and processes that we designed to realize the Single Suite Vision.

  • Liked Mikael Gislen
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    Mitigating clashing paradigms between Agile Development and ISO 9000

    Mikael Gislen
    Mikael Gislen
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There are, on a philosophical level, significant clashes between the agile paradigm and Quality Systems such as ISO 9000 or CMM/CMMi, this is already presented in the Agile Manifesto. Agile Development is based on what I would call post-modern paradigms when compared to the plan-driven and early iterative development methodologies which are based on a positivist paradigm.

    The underlying philosophical challenges cannot be easily mitigated. But a purist agile paradigm may tend to stress a positivist paradigm as well and this can be dangerous since then agile would not be agile any longer.

    While it may not be possible to completely remove the challenges between agile and quality systems, it is possible to learn to live with some tension between different paradigms. 

    There are some obvious areas of conflict, for examplethe Agile methodologies strongly discourages unnecessary documentation, and questions that it is possible to provide all requirements up-front. ISO 9000 on the other hand demands requirements up-front and documented evidence of almost anything, but such practical aspects can actually be mitigated with relative ease. Other aspects may demand much more effort. In particular the internal auditing process is problematic and other means of ensuring compliance may have to be considered.

    We have in my company systematically piloted a number of organisational changes in order to better support agile development. We have done this within the overall framework of our ISO 9000 system which is used a structure anda a gatekeeper. To do this we have used Action Research, which in it self is a kind of agile methodology, although of much older date than agile development.

    I will in my talk focus on the practical experiences we have had of building an organisational framework for agile development and while doing that suggesting a few means to mitigate the challenges mentioned initialy.

  • Liked Sudipta Lahiri
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    Capacity Planning for Dynamic Teams

    Sudipta Lahiri
    Sudipta Lahiri
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Fixed price (and fixed scope) projects dominate the offshore industry. These projects have offshore/onsite teams. They often have large team size (over 100s of people in one team).

    Agile thinking uses team velocity/ throughput and uses that to project an end date (Kanban system) or how much scope can be accomplished in a given time duration (number of sprints in SCRUM). They assume a stable team. However, this is not applicable for projects. They experience resource and productivity ramp-up issues. Often, resources keep changing as new projects come in. Projects do not have past velocity or throughput data. Extrapolating historical data from other similar projects, though possible, is inaccurate for multiple reasons.

    This talk is based on our experience of working with such project teams. They want to adopt agile methods. We show how they can adopt the Kanban Method and yet do: A) Initial Capacity Planning B) Assess the impact of scope creep to the project end date.

    The session assumes a basic understanding of the Kanban method.

  • Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Vinod Sankaranarayanan
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    Pravin Kumar Thakur
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    After more than 5 years of supporting the thetrainline.com platform, ThoughtWorks worked with The Trainline teams to transfer knowledge and context  back to the Trainline Teams.

    This methodology was co-created by ThoughtWorks and Trainline as a healthy sustainable and mature way to transfer knowledge. The transition itself was about a year long and involved multiple agile concepts around remote pairing, program MVP and above all, continuous delivery and non-disruption to business through the process.

    This presentation would take the audience through the experiences and learnings of the process. This session is co-presented by ThoughtWorks and Trainline (vendor and customer) and will provide an insight across multiple spectrums of delivery and business.

  • Liked Jim McCarthy
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    Culture Hacking: The Prospect of Magnificence

    Jim McCarthy
    Jim McCarthy
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    A culture is the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that both describes and shapes a group. The unique challenges of creating software have demanded totally new types of corporate culture. In response, we have created Agile, Scrum, and XP and many other cultural disciplines. These represent the birth of culture engineering and, although significant, are primitive compared to what will follow. Jim McCarthy introduces "culture hacking," a kind of cultural engineering that focuses on protecting personal freedom, extending openness, and embodying rationality. In the near future, a system made up of shared commitments and interpersonal protocols for hosting cultural innovations is likely to become available and standardized, leading to enormous personal and collective cultural and productivity gains. Happily, these gains will be based on culturally designed nobility of purpose, and a potent and virtuous cycle will continue to emerge, whereby profit derives from ennobled behavior. This cycle will lead to an era of widespread and abundant greatness - an era of unparalleled magnificence.

  • Liked Ram Ramalingam
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    The secret shortcuts to Agile... (that won't get you there)

    Ram Ramalingam
    Ram Ramalingam
    schedule 3 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    This is an exploratory talk, based, first, on some recent insights from cognitive science, behavioural economics (which have enriched Agile folklore already) and then on, some interesting twists from culture based research in sociology and psychology. While the former will be useful in understanding the common pitfalls encountered in a scaled Agile implementation, the latter, maybe useful in understanding the unexpected twists when doing scaled agile in a distributed/off-shore environment that have different cultural norms.

    While the anti-patterns and anti-paths are common across the world, the solution to these does differ. The assumptions behind what leads to a motivated, self-organizing, self-directing team will determine how to bring about a nuanced mindset to Agility, and understanding that what works in the West may not work in India (and other similar higher Power-Distance-Index countries).

    While sharing my experiences in a large scale Agile transformation and working with different cultures, I hope to bring out some subtle variations that could be useful in coaching and working with and transforming Agile teams in an offshore engagement.

  • Ebin John
    Ebin John
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    This is a talk about how to identify and differentiate between Transformation and Adoption. Many change agents and companies are using this term interchangeably. This talk is a sincere effort to bring out the subtle difference between the two.

    We will also discuss about some advantages and disadvantageous of Adoption and Transformation. We will also look at some criteria to select a suitable model that can work for you. The discussion will be mainly based on Schneider model and impact of organization culture on change management.

    I would like to share the way we have changed our transformation pattern after learning about the impact of the culture. Will discuss about the best practices as well as challenges we face now.

  • Liked Carlos Lopes
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    Multiple projects, different goals, one thing in common: the codebase!

    Carlos Lopes
    Carlos Lopes
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you developing new functionalities into branches? Have you ever experienced the pain of merging the changes into trunk? The so called "merge hell" is one of the first and probably the most important smell that tells you've been abusing of your source control manager branching capabilities and, most likely, hurting your productivity and your code quality as well. In order to move towards a continuous delivery approach, the practice of trunk based development suggests ways to avoid this type of issues among others like inconsistent feature sets, code that stays in an undeployable state for a long time, regressions introduced by semantic differences that arise during those joyful merging sessions, integration surprises with the other features, and the like. Even if you are not a developer on your team you will benefit from the examples and techniques presented.

  • Liked Balaji Ganesh N
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    Using Lean in Application Development to achieve competitive advantage and customer delight

    Balaji Ganesh N
    Balaji Ganesh N
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Executing add-on Application Development (AD) projects end to end is quite challenging. More so, if the same is executed under risk-reward model. According to an IBM study, only 40% of projects meet schedule, budget and quality goals. 20 to 25 percent don’t provide ROI and up to 50 percent require material rework. 

    With competitive pricing and cut throat competition eroding margins and denting market share, cost of delivery reduction with best in class quality has become an imperative for any service company in the IT outsourcing space.

    This case study shares the experience of an AD project (team size 40) in the Insurance domain completed over a period of 9 months (including warranty phase), with a geographic spread across 4 different locations. The team had end to end responsibility right from requirements gathering to System Integration Testing. The add-on functionality developed was rolled out to 5 states spanning 2 different releases. The team leveraged LEAN Six Sigma techniques (DSM, OA, Visual Controls, Mistake Proofing) for culture building, effective change management, early feedback, rework reduction through effective in-process defect reduction and doing things right the first time, resulting in increased customer goodwill, reward payments, enhanced business and high employee satisfaction. The project was flawlessly executed under the risk reward model with best in class quality, maintainability and scalability within the specified schedule.

  • Liked Vinodhini
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    Robotic Warehouses, Alien Domain, Offshore developers, Visionary customer : Saved by agile

    Vinodhini
    Vinodhini
    Thushara Wijewardena
    Thushara Wijewardena
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Here is a case study of how agile outsourcing can be practically applied even when the business domain is very complex and alien to offshore teams.
    The example is a project in which Exilesoft provided for a leading Norwegian producer of Robotic warehousing solutions. The project involved transforming their legacy application, produced using multiple suppliers and methods, into a newly cast application solution. This project also had its own share of typical challenges.

    • Lacked definitive and reliable documentation,
    • Domain knowledge was limited to a few very busy individuals,
    • Development and redeployment could not interrupt attention to current customers,
    • Complexity was high and design was fragmented, and
    • Focus heavily invested on current product and customer support

    These limitations along with the lack of understanding of agile methods strongly suggested the use of a method adaptive in nature, and not heavily vested in large inflexible legacy elements.
    We commenced the engagement with two pivotal elements; client awareness (agile orientation) and a roadmap of committed involvement. To lay credibility this had to be backed up with proven result delivery in the very early stages. It allowed for flexible adaption, and the creation of an atmosphere that fostered client interest.

    During this session, we will take the audience through a small video clipping of such a warehouse. We will elaborate how the customer and offshore developers worked together using agile in a highly integrated team collaboration model to achieve success within a very short time frame.

    The session will cover the following key areas:

    How such projects can be initiated

    - What type of team model and contract type we used

    - How we did the agile transformation with the customer

    - How the roles were assigned between offshore and onshore team members

    - To improve remote collaboration the tools and techniques we used

    - Techniues learned to get teams up to speed with the new domain

    - As we go along, the process changes we identified and implemented to make things work better.

    - Agile engineering practices and team dynamics that helps in such situations

  • Liked Andrea Heck
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    Distributed Product Owner Team for an Agile Medical Development

    Andrea Heck
    Andrea Heck
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Advanced

    We are developing medical imaging and workflow software in an agile way with development teams distributed to several countries. One of the major challenges is how to set up and communicate within the Product Owner team. There we have to deal with the distribution, e.g., have the Product Owner either onsite with her peers or with her Scrum team, travelling, or with proxy. We need people who are good in two different fields of knowledge: medical and software development. As a third issues, the environment of the customers may be different in different countries.

    We have ramped up local Product Owners in different countries, have found local collaboration customers, and have developed a set of communication channels and workshops how to synchronize Product Owners in the team, share a common vision and backlog with their Scrum teams, and collaborate with customers locally and globally.

  • Liked Evan Leybourn
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    Let's Kill an Agile Project

    Evan Leybourn
    Evan Leybourn
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Other talks and games will teach you how to run a successful Agile project. Only this one will teach you how to ruin an Agile project*. In this game we will break every Agile rule, disregard the manifesto and ignore common sense in the singular pursuit of failure (and fun).

    Each of you will be part of an Agile team with a dis-engaged Customer and micro-managing boss. Being Agile, there will be daily stand-ups, planning sessions, retrospectives, and kanban boards but nothing will go as you expect.

    * More importantly, this activity will teach you "how" Agile projects can fail and the reason behind many common Agile practices.

  • Liked Prasad
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    Distributed Agile 2.0

    Prasad
    Prasad
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There is nothing ‘Agile’ in the current distributed Agile project management systems, which is focused towards passively capturing and providing information to teams, they are traditionally designed for people who have no choice but to use, which are ‘transaction oriented than ‘relationship oriented’ this is really ‘anti Agile’.

    This discussion / talk is inspired by Geoffrey Moore concept of systems of engagement . This discussion / talk is intended to

    a)      Provoke thought on how to bring ‘Agile’ values and principle in transitioning from current Agile project management system designed around discrete pieces of information ("records") to systems which are more decentralized, & relationship oriented which embraces social behavior of a team.

    b)    Talk also brings out following uniqueness of Systems of engagement and how can we achieve it in distributed Agile context

    Systems of Engagement – Distributed Agile 2.0

    Systems of Records ( current Agile project management)

    High complexity

    High volume

    Relationship oriented

    Transaction oriented

    Outgrowth of project teams

    Outgrowth of value

    Organize around orchestrator

    Organize around concentrator

    Focus : Expertise, innovation and market development

    Focus : efficiency, speed, and adaptability

     

  • Liked Line Mark Rugholt
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    Cultural Intelligence (CQ) in distributed cross-cultural teams

    Line Mark Rugholt
    Line Mark Rugholt
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

     

    This workshop has two goals - one is to show that there are other intelligences than IQ which is by far the most well known type of intelligence. The second goal is to create understanding for the CQ model and its application in distributed cross-cultural teams.

    Many distributed cross-cultural teams work together without being aware how much their cultural backgrounds influence the work they do. Often times cultural differences is looked upon as a problem that create misunderstandings, which is also the case sometimes. In the CQ model we also look at cultural differences as an asset that can also create more creativity and that can be the building blocks for high performing teams. If you want this to happen you have to work with your team to get it to the level of high performance. Here, using CQ can help you.

    This workshop consists of a presentation of CQ and its four elements (Drive, Knowledge, Strategy, Action). Moreover, this workshop will look at how CQ and High Performing Teams are correlated, and finally we will try to apply CQ to our own teams and see how it can be used there.

     

    CQ is a reserach based model, that consists of the four CQ elements and an online 360 test that can be used for developing teams, for recruitment, for individual development, coaching etc.

  • Liked Anuradha Gajanayaka
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    Some say they do Scrum to be agile ...

    Anuradha Gajanayaka
    Anuradha Gajanayaka
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    In the challenging context of offshore Agile Software Development, not everything in the book would work. In this experience report, I would like to discuss how the teams can tailor the current so called standard Agile methodologies/practices (within the guidelines of the Agile Manifesto), yet become successful in deliveries.

    In the session, I would like to discuss some of the agile practices the audience is using and then discuss the challenges they face when it comes to Agile Offshore Development. Then I would like to draw my experience on offshore software development projects where we successfully used Agile concepts and demonstrate how to customize those standard methodologies/practices within the Agile Manifesto Framework.

  • Liked Raj Anantharaman
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    Cross Geo Collaboration and Delivery of Intel's Tablet - Scaled Agile and ALM Tools Story

    Raj Anantharaman
    Raj Anantharaman
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    We all know it takes a group of skilled engineers and developers to deliver any successful product. But what if they are all located in various geos, have different competencies / focus areas (hardware, software), on top of it - they are given a stringent deadline to deliver? In my session I'd like to share how Intel adopted the Scaled Agile framework and a homegrown "Managed Personal Accountability" (MPA) model to deliver the first tablet solution successfully. 

    It took a combination of good Agile planning and execution (Scrum of Scrums), an integrated ALM Toolset, along with performance management metrics of MPA to deliver this project successfully.

  • Liked Pooja Wandile
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    Meeting the challenges of agile principles: An offshore Scrum Master perspective

    Pooja Wandile
    Pooja Wandile
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    The 12 agile principles lay the foundation for a successful agile team and deliver a product that meets customer satisfaction. Every principle is an absolute necessity to build great software and great teams. While these principles have stood the testimony of time over a decade now, much has changed the way we build and deliver software, especially from an offshore perspective. Adoption of agile methods does not simply imply a framework or a process implementation, but it goes beyond that.

    In this talk, I share the experience of a Scrum Master, who in hindsight, look at the challenges such as lack of trust, micro management, lack of technical excellence, managing stakeholder’s expectations etc. and the impact on team’s performance. This is the result of ignoring agile values and principles which could have been avoided. Lastly, we look at the actions taken by the team and Scrum Master to turn on the challenges into a win-win situation for both onshore and offshore teams and become one of the successful agile teams.