• Liked Tarang Baxi
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    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Mikael Gislen
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    Mitigating clashing paradigms between Agile Development and ISO 9000

    Mikael Gislen
    Mikael Gislen
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There are, on a philosophical level, significant clashes between the agile paradigm and Quality Systems such as ISO 9000 or CMM/CMMi, this is already presented in the Agile Manifesto. Agile Development is based on what I would call post-modern paradigms when compared to the plan-driven and early iterative development methodologies which are based on a positivist paradigm.

    The underlying philosophical challenges cannot be easily mitigated. But a purist agile paradigm may tend to stress a positivist paradigm as well and this can be dangerous since then agile would not be agile any longer.

    While it may not be possible to completely remove the challenges between agile and quality systems, it is possible to learn to live with some tension between different paradigms. 

    There are some obvious areas of conflict, for examplethe Agile methodologies strongly discourages unnecessary documentation, and questions that it is possible to provide all requirements up-front. ISO 9000 on the other hand demands requirements up-front and documented evidence of almost anything, but such practical aspects can actually be mitigated with relative ease. Other aspects may demand much more effort. In particular the internal auditing process is problematic and other means of ensuring compliance may have to be considered.

    We have in my company systematically piloted a number of organisational changes in order to better support agile development. We have done this within the overall framework of our ISO 9000 system which is used a structure anda a gatekeeper. To do this we have used Action Research, which in it self is a kind of agile methodology, although of much older date than agile development.

    I will in my talk focus on the practical experiences we have had of building an organisational framework for agile development and while doing that suggesting a few means to mitigate the challenges mentioned initialy.

  • Liked Ravi Kumar
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    Evolutionary Approach for Maturing Agile Adoption in IT Services

    Ravi Kumar
    Ravi Kumar
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Change is a necessity and fact of organization sustenance and survival. Some changes are quite disruptive while others evolve gradually. Agile when compared to the many of the other models is radical and requires some fundamental shifts both in culture and traditional management practices. The Indian IT Services industry is at the crossroads of change with a heavy influx of agile projects in the recent past. Effective change in the context of agile with a heavy baggage from the past makes it harder. Business still has to continue and projects must be executed; so how do we go about an effective agile adoption/transition.

    This talk will try and look into the complexity and inhibitors of successful agile adoption in a typical large IT Services organization and questions the viability of certain agile methods such as Scrum and XP. We will explore why evolutionary methods such as Lean/Kanban are better fit and the necessity for evolutionary software development such as emergent design as a core premise for delivering Professional Software Development Services. Finally we also challenge the current status quo that is detrimental to a meaningful agile adoption and suggest few positive changes with Agile IT Services Manifesto.

  • Liked Ram Ramalingam
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    The secret shortcuts to Agile... (that won't get you there)

    Ram Ramalingam
    Ram Ramalingam
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    This is an exploratory talk, based, first, on some recent insights from cognitive science, behavioural economics (which have enriched Agile folklore already) and then on, some interesting twists from culture based research in sociology and psychology. While the former will be useful in understanding the common pitfalls encountered in a scaled Agile implementation, the latter, maybe useful in understanding the unexpected twists when doing scaled agile in a distributed/off-shore environment that have different cultural norms.

    While the anti-patterns and anti-paths are common across the world, the solution to these does differ. The assumptions behind what leads to a motivated, self-organizing, self-directing team will determine how to bring about a nuanced mindset to Agility, and understanding that what works in the West may not work in India (and other similar higher Power-Distance-Index countries).

    While sharing my experiences in a large scale Agile transformation and working with different cultures, I hope to bring out some subtle variations that could be useful in coaching and working with and transforming Agile teams in an offshore engagement.

  • Liked Carlos Lopes
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    Multiple projects, different goals, one thing in common: the codebase!

    Carlos Lopes
    Carlos Lopes
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you developing new functionalities into branches? Have you ever experienced the pain of merging the changes into trunk? The so called "merge hell" is one of the first and probably the most important smell that tells you've been abusing of your source control manager branching capabilities and, most likely, hurting your productivity and your code quality as well. In order to move towards a continuous delivery approach, the practice of trunk based development suggests ways to avoid this type of issues among others like inconsistent feature sets, code that stays in an undeployable state for a long time, regressions introduced by semantic differences that arise during those joyful merging sessions, integration surprises with the other features, and the like. Even if you are not a developer on your team you will benefit from the examples and techniques presented.

  • Liked Chad Wathington
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    The Broken State of Process Improvement in Software Development

    Chad Wathington
    Chad Wathington
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Experimentation and the scientific method are very valuable for validating business opportunities. The Lean Startup and Lean UX are driving new thought patterns in the software development world. However, despite all the new thinking on product, rarely do organizations apply these techniques to their processes, opting for inefficiently adding more steps ad nauseum until productivity has ground to a halt. We’ll cover the following topics:

    • What are processes, and why do we need them
    • How processes affect delivery and productivity
    • Scale and process inefficiency
    • Process experimentation techniques
    • Designing productive processes
  • Liked Arlo Belshee
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    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • Liked Joseph V
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    Tale of an Off-shore Agile Scrum Implementation

    Joseph V
    Joseph V
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Couple of years ago our business unit engaged a vendor in India  to do some software development for us.  Since we are agile scrum based organization, we are seeking a vendor who has exposure to agile. We identified and signed up with a vendor to start the process. It was a ride filled lot of excitement and challenges. Finally we are able to land safely.

  • Liked Ravi Kumar
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    Evolutionary Approach for Maturing Agile Adoption in IT Services

    Ravi Kumar
    Ravi Kumar
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Change is a necessity and fact of organization sustenance and survival. Some changes are quite disruptive while others evolve gradually. Agile when compared to the many of the other models is radical and requires some fundamental shifts both in culture and traditional management practices. The Indian IT Services industry is at the crossroads of change with a heavy influx of agile projects in the recent past. Effective change in the context of agile with a heavy baggage from the past makes it harder. Business still has to continue and projects must be executed; so how do we go about an effective agile adoption/transition.

    This talk will try and look into the complexity and inhibitors of successful agile adoption in a typical large IT Services organization and questions the viability of certain agile methods such as Scrum and XP. We will explore why evolutionary methods such as Lean/Kanban are better fit and the necessity for evolutionary software development such as emergent design as a core premise for delivering Professional Software Development Services. Finally we also challenge the current status quo that is detrimental to a meaningful agile adoption and suggest few positive changes with Agile IT Services Manifesto.

  • Liked Tarang Baxi
    keyboard_arrow_down

    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    Tarang Baxi
    Tarang Baxi
    Chirag Doshi
    Chirag Doshi
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
  • Liked Chad Wathington
    keyboard_arrow_down

    The Broken State of Process Improvement in Software Development

    Chad Wathington
    Chad Wathington
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Experimentation and the scientific method are very valuable for validating business opportunities. The Lean Startup and Lean UX are driving new thought patterns in the software development world. However, despite all the new thinking on product, rarely do organizations apply these techniques to their processes, opting for inefficiently adding more steps ad nauseum until productivity has ground to a halt. We’ll cover the following topics:

    • What are processes, and why do we need them
    • How processes affect delivery and productivity
    • Scale and process inefficiency
    • Process experimentation techniques
    • Designing productive processes
  • Liked Pavel Dabrytski
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    Agile Anti-Patterns in Distributed Teams

    Pavel Dabrytski
    Pavel Dabrytski
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Implementing Agile is hard. You know what is even harder? Implementing Agile across distributed offshore teams.
    Due to constrains we face in our daily communication and collaboration, it is always difficult to get rid of old waterfall thinking. Sometime waterfall way even feels easier. This is where we find most of Distributed Agile Anti-Patterns.
    Agile Anti-Pattern often looks like Agile, it follows the right mechanics, but it is missing essential Agile values and principles.
    Join me for an interactive session where you will learn about 10 Agile Anti-Patterns specific to outsource and offshore development, and the ways to address them.

    Some of my favourite Anti-Patterns are:
    * Retrospective via emails
    * Scrum Master across the sea
    * Stabilisation sprint (sprint for bug fixing)

  • Liked Arlo Belshee
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    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • Liked Arijit Sarbagna
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    Reading the pulse of an offshore Project - what to look for?

    Arijit Sarbagna
    Arijit Sarbagna
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Have you been thorough the process of outsourcing your Agile project to an offshore service provider? If yes - you must have wondered how you should be measuring the progress & success of the work that is getting carried out by your service provider. But what could be the measuring criteria? How do you know if you are heading the right direction or not?

    In this session we look in to the aspects of identifying how one may successfully measure the state of an ongoing delivery model & based on it, how we refine/improve the outcome.

    Backdrop:

    Over the last 10 years while working in onsite-offshore model, what I have personally come across is the fact - whenever we work on Agile, we do come across one magic phrase every now & then - "I have also worked on Agile". Yes, we all have! :) Agile is simple & there is no rocket science in doing so while delivering across onsite & offshore. We all know the drill i.e. set up some time zone overlaps, establish virtual communication channels, identify some Proxy POs, have some kind of "all hands" infrequently & we should be good. Isn't it?

    We all know these (at least we all claim so)! But then why is it that some of the projects do better than the rest & some even fail? Why is this that we don't realize that if you offshore your work in Kolkata, you deal with a different cultural barrier than if you offshore the work at Bangalore (or vice versa)? Did we ever consider that it is upon us - the so called Agilists - to bring up the Agile knowhow to our clients (& many a times - learn from clients as well)? These are the simple - yet mostly unnoticed elements - which play a crucial role in deciding how a project succeeds in Agile offshoring & we should be able to take them in to consideration.

  • Liked Arijit Sarbagna
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    Agile Offshoring: Touching the right chord

    Arijit Sarbagna
    Arijit Sarbagna
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    More often we jump in to the Agile bandwagon - bit prematurely. And mostly as we try to do so, we fall flat (well, there are exceptions of course) & jump to an off-shoring organization. The good news is, by doing so - we may have just taken the second (i.e. after deciding to go Agile) right step i.e. if we don't have the expertise in house, bringing in the talent from outside makes most sense. But we need to keep in mind; unless we ourselves are not having an open mind to embrace the changes, we are most likely to fail despite all our good intentions.

     

    Basis of this talk:

    I am working on Agile onsite-offshore model for last 10+ years (with total 15+ years in the service industry). Over these years, have dealt with numerous small (2-3 teams - all co-located) to large scale (75+ teams, spread across multiple geographical boundaries) Agile engagements & have worked as consultant to several projects. Offshoring is a big challenge - not only to our clients, but also to ourselves - as we often fight the situation, where customer is either too rigid on Agile expectations or too much bent towards traditional PM style. Bringing the right mix is always the tough ask - that is where the success of the project depends.

  • Liked Joseph V
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    Tale of an Off-shore Agile Scrum Implementation

    Joseph V
    Joseph V
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Couple of years ago our business unit engaged a vendor in India  to do some software development for us.  Since we are agile scrum based organization, we are seeking a vendor who has exposure to agile. We identified and signed up with a vendor to start the process. It was a ride filled lot of excitement and challenges. Finally we are able to land safely.

  • Liked Dinesh Sharma
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    Trust and Committment, a two point mantra for a successful agile projects in offshore

    Dinesh Sharma
    Dinesh Sharma
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile projects success (or failure) depends on two key points in an offshore setuo i.e. Trust and Commitment. Lack of either can cause serious trouble in agile projects as they say "You can't solve people problems with policies". So a lack of Trust on each other (Customer and Supplier) leads to rigid, complicated, lengthy SLA driven contracts and both side fight over it by taking oath of 'the contract'. Trust comes from knowing each other well and it takes some serious commitment to build trust. Committment from Customer should be is to treat its supplier more as partner or equal stakeholder in the project and invest in making a strong, trustworthy relationship early in the project to build a long lasting bond. Also, equally from a supplier committment is to understand its Customer challenge and help them to achieve their business goals. A committed supplier will invest in its people to produce a best quality product for its Customer and be transparent with their (and customer) organisation culture and its challenges and openly discuss how to overcome those. A bond based on Trust and Commitment goes a long way and bring a very healthy environment for people working in that environment.

  • Liked Dinesh Sharma
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    Offshoring Agile Projects - Myth, lies and Facts

    Dinesh Sharma
    Dinesh Sharma
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Offshoring in an agile environment (especially with Indian IT organisation) is always a hot topic within agile communities. You will often find people talk about challenges rather than opportunities with offshoring agile projects e.g.

    • communication challenge,
    • lack of focus on quality,
    • rigid offshore organisation environment,
    • lack of agile practice knowledge,
    • lack of trust etc.

    Although these constraint-cum-challenges often directly linked to offshoring but it can exists in a non-offshore environment as well. For example, to see how you can work effectively with distributed teams you don't need run a project in offshore environment, just split your teams and ask them to sit on a different floor without seeing each other face to face and all these so called offshore challenges will appear in an onsite environment as well.

    So lets understand various Myths, lies and facts about offshoring agile project and understand key ingredients to make it successful.

  • Liked Pooja Wandile
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    The different engagement models, processes, challenges and solutions for a distributed Scrum Team in an outsourced product development (OPD)

    Pooja Wandile
    Pooja Wandile
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A distributed Scrum team is a necessity than a choice in many cases. Often customers and their suppliers struggle to put up a team model that will work effectively and provide maximum value. The customer wants to be absolutely sure how the entire engagement will be executed so that there are no surprises later.

    So, what are the different ways of forming teams in a distributed environment, what is the impact on the execution, how do you execute different engagement models, what challenges do you see and so on? These are the questions the customers are interested in.

    This talk will focus on answering the above questions. We have defined 3 types of distributed team models and implemented in few of the projects in an onshore-offshore scenario. We have also tailored scrum meetings like planning, DSM, etc. so that these meetings are more effective in distributed model. While some of the changes have worked, some still needs to be enhanced further.

     

  • Liked Mikael Gislen
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    Mitigating clashing paradigms between Agile Development and ISO 9000

    Mikael Gislen
    Mikael Gislen
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There are, on a philosophical level, significant clashes between the agile paradigm and Quality Systems such as ISO 9000 or CMM/CMMi, this is already presented in the Agile Manifesto. Agile Development is based on what I would call post-modern paradigms when compared to the plan-driven and early iterative development methodologies which are based on a positivist paradigm.

    The underlying philosophical challenges cannot be easily mitigated. But a purist agile paradigm may tend to stress a positivist paradigm as well and this can be dangerous since then agile would not be agile any longer.

    While it may not be possible to completely remove the challenges between agile and quality systems, it is possible to learn to live with some tension between different paradigms. 

    There are some obvious areas of conflict, for examplethe Agile methodologies strongly discourages unnecessary documentation, and questions that it is possible to provide all requirements up-front. ISO 9000 on the other hand demands requirements up-front and documented evidence of almost anything, but such practical aspects can actually be mitigated with relative ease. Other aspects may demand much more effort. In particular the internal auditing process is problematic and other means of ensuring compliance may have to be considered.

    We have in my company systematically piloted a number of organisational changes in order to better support agile development. We have done this within the overall framework of our ISO 9000 system which is used a structure anda a gatekeeper. To do this we have used Action Research, which in it self is a kind of agile methodology, although of much older date than agile development.

    I will in my talk focus on the practical experiences we have had of building an organisational framework for agile development and while doing that suggesting a few means to mitigate the challenges mentioned initialy.

  • Liked Ram Ramalingam
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    The secret shortcuts to Agile... (that won't get you there)

    Ram Ramalingam
    Ram Ramalingam
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    This is an exploratory talk, based, first, on some recent insights from cognitive science, behavioural economics (which have enriched Agile folklore already) and then on, some interesting twists from culture based research in sociology and psychology. While the former will be useful in understanding the common pitfalls encountered in a scaled Agile implementation, the latter, maybe useful in understanding the unexpected twists when doing scaled agile in a distributed/off-shore environment that have different cultural norms.

    While the anti-patterns and anti-paths are common across the world, the solution to these does differ. The assumptions behind what leads to a motivated, self-organizing, self-directing team will determine how to bring about a nuanced mindset to Agility, and understanding that what works in the West may not work in India (and other similar higher Power-Distance-Index countries).

    While sharing my experiences in a large scale Agile transformation and working with different cultures, I hope to bring out some subtle variations that could be useful in coaching and working with and transforming Agile teams in an offshore engagement.

  • Liked Carlos Lopes
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    Multiple projects, different goals, one thing in common: the codebase!

    Carlos Lopes
    Carlos Lopes
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you developing new functionalities into branches? Have you ever experienced the pain of merging the changes into trunk? The so called "merge hell" is one of the first and probably the most important smell that tells you've been abusing of your source control manager branching capabilities and, most likely, hurting your productivity and your code quality as well. In order to move towards a continuous delivery approach, the practice of trunk based development suggests ways to avoid this type of issues among others like inconsistent feature sets, code that stays in an undeployable state for a long time, regressions introduced by semantic differences that arise during those joyful merging sessions, integration surprises with the other features, and the like. Even if you are not a developer on your team you will benefit from the examples and techniques presented.

  • Liked Prasad
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    Distributed Agile 2.0

    Prasad
    Prasad
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    There is nothing ‘Agile’ in the current distributed Agile project management systems, which is focused towards passively capturing and providing information to teams, they are traditionally designed for people who have no choice but to use, which are ‘transaction oriented than ‘relationship oriented’ this is really ‘anti Agile’.

    This discussion / talk is inspired by Geoffrey Moore concept of systems of engagement . This discussion / talk is intended to

    a)      Provoke thought on how to bring ‘Agile’ values and principle in transitioning from current Agile project management system designed around discrete pieces of information ("records") to systems which are more decentralized, & relationship oriented which embraces social behavior of a team.

    b)    Talk also brings out following uniqueness of Systems of engagement and how can we achieve it in distributed Agile context

    Systems of Engagement – Distributed Agile 2.0

    Systems of Records ( current Agile project management)

    High complexity

    High volume

    Relationship oriented

    Transaction oriented

    Outgrowth of project teams

    Outgrowth of value

    Organize around orchestrator

    Organize around concentrator

    Focus : Expertise, innovation and market development

    Focus : efficiency, speed, and adaptability

     

  • Liked Mark Shead
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    Effective Communication With A Distributed Team

    Mark Shead
    Mark Shead
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Face-to-face communication is recognized in the Agile Principles as the best way for teams to convey information. However, not all teams can be co-located. Successful communication on distributed teams isn't just a matter of just buying the right technology. Teams with a strong communication culture will find a way to communicate well regardless of what official tools they are given. Poor communication cultures will do poorly even with state of the art tools.

    This talk is going to use specific examples to show how to enable effective communication and trust between team members distributed across different locations and timezones. While there will be some discussion of technology, the focus is on how to identify and foster a culture of communication on your team. 

     

  • Liked Joe Zachariah
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    Can India be truly Agile?

    Joe Zachariah
    Joe Zachariah
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    It's Indian Independence day today as I work on this proposal. As I read newspapers today, I understand the importance of the IT and ITES Offshore business, which has almost single handedly provided employment to millions of technically suave and English speaking folks. One question that repeatedly comes to surface is whether the Indian IT industry will be able to up its game from the servicing mentality which started the boom of IT in India. As Agile and Scrum began to become the flavour of the worldwide IT industry, many firms in India also went out on the Agile path, many of them out of pressure from their Western clients. Some of them were successful, but there are also numerous examples of failures of the Agile model and also half hearted adoptions, which have led Western businesses to believe that maybe India is not adept enough to take its game to the next level where teams can follow the Agile framework.

    My talk would be driven by my experiences of following Agile in different ways in my different teams over the last 6-7 years. My forays into the Agile ways of software delivery in India have been largely successful and I cannot see a reason why Agile will not work in India.

    In my talk, I would focus on the reasons on why Agile would work in India. Right from the way we approach diversity and inclusivity, to the way we approach our post election coalition party governance model, the Indian way of living is rife with finding innovative ways to quickly adapt to change, which essentially is the Agile mantra.

    I plan to start with a simple example. Of the Western way of cooking & dining as compared to the Indian way of cooking & dining. A traditional Indian kitchen is a sacred space. It is decorated with auspicious signs. Sometimes, it doubles up as a puja room. In many households, you are not allowed to enter the kitchen with footwear, you are expected to bathe before lighting the kitchen fire, you are not allowed to eat unless you have taken a bath - these can be metaphorically compared with the Ceremonies that an Agile team practising Scrum follows - the daily standups, sprint planning and reviews, etc. However the core delivery is the food. And no matter what ceremonies you follow and what your menu for the day is, the food comes out daily at the same time and is served everyday with the same set of stakeholders. There aren't as many tools and supporting equipment that you might see as in a Western kitchen, but at the end of the day the practices followed in a typical Indian kitchen are very Agile at heart.

    There are many other examples from Indian culture and mythology that one can refer to understand that Indians are essentially Agile at heart. Open source product groups, many of which are largely Agile, can also find a reference point in Indian culture and mythology. That which is timeless is referred to in the Indian context as Sanatan. It refers to wisdom that has no founder and is best described as collaborative and open source freeware. Every idea is accepted but only that which survives the test of time, space and situation eventually matters.

    There are many myths circulating in the IT industry that Agile cannot survive in India, since Indians cannot be trusted to be self governed and always require direction. Also Indians don't know how to have fun at work. Through my presentation I seek to dispel those myths drawing from Indian mythology and culture and essentially try to make folks understand that reasons for Agile not working in India is the same as Agile not working elsewhere. What you need to make Agile work at the end of the day, is just the belief that it will work.