Software projects are all about collaboration – within teams, with external teams, external agencies, etc.Executing a project as a stand-alone team even in a sterile agile environment can be challenging. But what happens when you have to additionally collaborate with other non-agile teams to accomplish project goals?

Non-agile teams follow different processes, have different priorities and most of all have a different mindset. How, as a Product Owner, can you plan sprint goals and milestones, get these teams to buy-in to your project vision and take time out to prioritize and help accomplish your project goals.

In my session, I will share my experience in working with non-agile teams. I will explore the challenges that both teams face, and share practices and solutions that, if adopted, could make the end-result a win-win for all teams involved.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Why do we need to work with non-agile teams
  • Project Overview – Set in a IT Services environ
  • The challenges faced by teams involved
  • Reaching a middle ground – understanding team processes, priorities and pain points
  • Finding a solution – tailoring agile  

Learning Outcome

How the agile process could be adapted to work with non-agile teams.

Target Audience

Product Owners, team leads

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

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  • Nitin Ramrakhyani
    By Nitin Ramrakhyani  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Angeline,

    Can you also quote a example/ reference for the kind of non-agile teams you are pointing to? Are you hinting at a specific function (as Sachin pointed in Testing ? ) / outsourced partner ? That'll help the reviewers in understanding the context from where you are coming from. Also, if you could elaborate on the learning outcomes a bit more, that'll make the proposal more appealing.

    Thanks,

    Nitin

    • Angeline Aggarwal
      By Angeline Aggarwal  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Nitin,

      Thanks for your feedback and suggestion. The teams that I work with and have dependencies on are mainly support teams, Subject matter experts from the Business side, Ops teams, other dev teams that do not follow agile.

      The learning outcomes that i propose lean towards how to plan for these dependencies and involve these teams in my project, and help them understand the value add to their project/activities in order to get their buy in and support

       

      • Doc Norton
        By Doc Norton  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Angeline:

        The problem you propose is common, so I see potential here, but I don't know if there is enough significant substance to consider this for the conference.

        Can you be more specific about the lessons learned and techniques you've used to engage with these teams and successfully work with them? Is this about working with non-Agile teams or is this about working with any external team? How do the techniques you use for working with external agile teams differ from the techniques you use for working with external non-agile teams?

        Is this possibly a 20 minute experience report where you share your exerience as you learned to work with external teams?

        • Sachin goel
          By Sachin goel  ~  4 years ago
          reply Reply

           Hi Angeline : can you pls also provide an example of tailoring agile in this context for the team to understand it better?

          thanks

          Sachin

  • Sachin goel
    By Sachin goel  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi

    Thanks for your submission. I am curious to know if you plan to cover testing aspects of an agile team dealing with non agile teams. In my view this can be quite interesting as the agile relies heavily on automated testing, continuous value add etc. In dealing with non agile teams, you may have to wait before the dependencies gets real.

    Thanks

    Sachin

    • Angeline Aggarwal
      By Angeline Aggarwal  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Sachin,

      Testing is an important part of my project. Since we have cross functional teams in agile, testers are part of the team iteself. So while we do not depend on other teams for testing, we do depend on the outcomes of their development/testing activities. However, due to the nature of the project, we rely on manual testing rather than automated.

       


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