Scaling XP Practices inside your organization using Train-the-Trainer Model

schedule Feb 26th 01:30 PM - Jan 1st 12:00 AM place Sigma

How do you effectively scale skill-based, quality training across your organization?

Over the years, I've experimented with different ideas/models to scaling skill-based training across an organization. In the last 4 years, I've pretty much settled down on the following model. Its very useful when mentoring teams on skills like Test-Drive-Development (TDD), Behavior-Driven Development (BDD), Product Discovery, Writing User Stories, Evolutionary Design, Design Patterns, Problem Solving, etc. I've successfully implemented this model at some very prominent fortune 500 enterprises.

The goal of this workshop is to explore what other successful models organized have used to scale skill-based training in their organization.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The participants will be divided in groups of 5-6. For each exercise, they will collaborate with other participants in their groups and present back their consolidated learning to the other the groups.

  1. Differentiate skill-based training from other kinds of training - 10 mins
  2. Discussion on adult learning touching upon activity based, informal learning - 15 mins
  3. Key ingredients of any skill-based training - 15 mins
  4. Presentation on Train-the-Trainer Model - 15 mins
  5. Discussion on other training models - 10 mins
  6. What should we measure to know the effectiveness of the training - 15 mins
  7. Recap - 10 mins

Learning Outcome

  • Differentiate between skill-based,experiential training from passive, knowledge-based training
  • Gain insights into how adults learn (activity based, informal, pull-based learning)
  • Understand the key ingredients of what makes a skill-based training effective
  • Various different models of scaling training
  • A measurement framework to know if the training is being effective

Target Audience

Leadership Team, Change Agents responsible for rolling out Agile methods inside their organization

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

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  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Naresh - Great proposal on a highly relevant topic, and I like very much how the format itself models the content.  I'm very interested to hear about your experiences with this model as well as alternative approaches that may emerge from other participants. 

    • Naresh Jain
      By Naresh Jain  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks for the kind words, Ellen. 

      Alternative approaches that may emerge: apprenticeship model, induction program model, finishing school model, pyramid training model, etc. Some techniques specifically for programming topics can be coding dojo, code retreat, refactoring fest, design fest, etc.

      Since this is a workshop, I'm would expect the participants to help us figure out other approaches. 

      I've used this model at 3 very popular companies, to teach over 200 programmers in each org., on skills like Evolutionary Design, Design Patterns, Test Driven Development, Refactoring Legacy Code and Continuous Deployment.

      In my past experience, it would take anywhere bwteen 6 months to 2 years to get 200+ programmer confident with these skills. But with this approach, we were able to finish this in slightly less than 3 months. Surely there is no short-cut to getting deep understanding of these practices and can take several years, but getting people on board itself can be a daunting task. And this approach certainly helped us address that issue. We were able to get more people on board quicker.

      Let me know if this helps. I can share more details if need be. However my proposal for a workshop is more about getting others to share their experience.


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