location_city Bengaluru schedule Feb 26th 02:55 PM - Jan 1st 12:00 AM place Esquire

Are you an Agile Practitioner? Or are you responsible for Agile transformation?

Organizations that have begun their Agile journey welcome the guidance of an experienced Agile Coach. But external guidance cannot continue indefinitely as the only way to scale Agile.

If you are in an Agile team, are you prepared to take on the coaching role for other teams once your Agile Coach moves on?

If you are a manager, are you looking at grooming in-house coaches to scale and self-sustain transformation?

The transitioning of practitioners into coaches can be key to your Agile journey. Individuals get to build on their potential, while the organization becomes more self-reliant.

This session explores my personal journey from practitioner to coach. It should help you too in taking that first jump into the role of a coach. I will share real-world examples of dealing with on-the-fly situations, and of preparing upfront where possible. I will recommend resources, and mention handy techniques that should be in a coach's toolkit. The session essentially provides a kick-start for first-time coaches.

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Experience Report

5 mins: Introduction - Practitioner to Coach
5 mins: Coaching activities and techniques
5 mins: Common patterns and gotchas
5 mins: Support structures, resources, and way forward

Learning Outcome

Some of these will be covered in the session, and some in the experience report:

* Roles and responsibilities of an Agile Coach
* Types of coaching engagements
* A peek into a coach's toolkit:
  ** Assessments and progress tracking (interviewing, process mapping, metrics, etc)
  ** Facilitation (handling retros, group discussion, etc, with fist of five, mind-mapping, etc)
  ** Enabling self-discovery and self-learning (5 why's, Socratic method, etc)
  ** and more
* Common patterns and gotchas
* How to apply your practitioner skills for coaching
* How to pick up new skills
* Reading recommendations
* Why practitioner to coach:
  ** Individual perspective
  ** Organization perspective

Target Audience

Team member, Manager, Coach

schedule Submitted 6 years ago

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