Achieving Enterprise Agility with the Scaled Agile Framework...and Have Fun Doing It!

Scrum, XP, Kanban and related methods have been proven to provide step changes in productivity and quality for software teams. However, these methods do not have the native constructs necessary to scale to the enterprise. What the industry desperately needs is a solution that moves from a set of simplistic, disparate, development-centric methods, to a scalable, unified approach that addresses the complex constructs and additional stakeholders in the organization—and enables realization of enterprise-class product or service initiatives via aligned and cooperative solution development.

 
 

Outline/structure of the Session

Overview of the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe)

Lean Thinking

Agile Teams: The Foundation

Scaling Teams to Programs

Scaling Programs to Portfolios

Winning is Fun

 

Learning Outcome

In this tutorial, Colin O'Neill describes how to accomplish this with the Scaled Agile Framework, a publicly–accessible knowledge base of proven Lean and Agile practices for enterprise-class software development. He approaches the problem from the perspectives of Lean thinking and principles of product development flow, illustrating how these core principles help deliver business results at scale, while keeping the development system—and the enterprise—lean and able to responsive rapidly to changing market needs.

Target Audience

Executives, enterprise change agents, agile team members, agile consultants

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Colin

    Can you tell me more about the actual format of your tutorial? I'm curious to know in a bit more detail how you would use 90 min and whether there are interactive elements to your tutorial.  Any information you can share regarding the format of the presentation would be helpful to the reviewers.

    Thanks!

    Ellen

  • Erez Tatcher
    By Erez Tatcher  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Colin,

    SAFe seems to attract a lot of attention these days and the subject is certainly interesting. I think that what people are most interested in hearing is real case studies, are you planning to present those in your talk? Do you personally have any real experience in implementing SAFe that you can talk about?

    Thanks,

    Erez

    • Colin O
      By Colin O'Neill  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Erez,

      The presentation includes positive results of several companies that have adopted SAFe. As a co-founder of Scaled Agile, Inc., I have been delivering Enterprise agile solutions in the field for the past three years. Last week I delivered a SAFe training and certification course in Bangalore, and met with several members of the local ALN. I'm impressed with the state of Agile adoption in India, and look forward to meeting you at the conference in February.

      Regards, 

      Colin

  • Ram Srinivasan
    By Ram Srinivasan  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    @Erez -

    Colin was the person who taught me SAFe. He is one of the four instructors.

    Ram


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