Net Promoter System for Agile Companies

schedule Mar 1st 04:30 PM - Jan 1st 12:00 AM place Esquire

Customer collaboration is essential to every Agile business. To create and collaborate to keep a customer is the purpose of an organisation. But still lots of companies try to make bad profits, i.e. profits earned at the expense of customer relationships. The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a renowned open-source system which addresses and measures customer collaboration. And did you know that you not only can use it to get feedback on your products and services, but also on your employees and your personal performance?

NPS is a perfect fit for Agile companies - and those who want to be. Most of the companies I worked with (Agile coaching, training, consulting) had not heard about it, and far less were actually using it. This really surprises me, since NPS integrates like a charm with Agile, e.g. within product development via Scrum.

In this session I'll explain the basics of NPS, i.e. promoters and detractors, satisfied and delighted customers, bad profits (how to deal with bad feedback?) and good profits, and why and how to measure these. Several stories from companies like Apple Retail, Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and others will help to make my point. I’ll further show why NPS is a very good fit with Agile regarding products, employees, and personal performance. Dos and Don’ts regarding NPS (also from personal experience) will close this session. Related to the Don'ts, I also cover some of the negative critiques out there.

 
6 favorite thumb_down thumb_up 6 comments visibility_off  Remove from Watchlist visibility  Add to Watchlist
 

Outline/structure of the Session

This is the structure of the talk. Each point roughly consumes equal time:

  • Why the need for NPS (good and bad profits)?

  • What is NPS (promoters, passives, detractors, and how to calculate the score)?

  • Live Demo (participants should rate an event and calculate the NPS for the entire room)

  • NPS and Agile: why they fit perfectly?

  • How to introduce NPS in an Agile organisation?

  • What to measure (products, employees, personal performance)?

  • Dos and Don’ts

I will allow questions during the talk. There are exercises for the audience in this talk.

Learning Outcome

What will participants get out of this session?

A solid understanding about…

  • …what is NPS,

  • …what are the elements of NPS,

  • …how NPS works with an Agile Company, and

  • …what to measure with NPS (and why).

 

Target Audience

Target audience is leaders, (line) managers, executives, and everyone with customer contact (aka everyone in an ideal Agile team). The audience should be at least a little experienced in Agile (e.g. Scrum, Kanban).

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Prasad
    By Prasad  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Good topic and nice sldie decks

    Accept from my side

    ~Prasad

  • Jerry Rajamoney
    By Jerry Rajamoney  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Bernd,

    This is a new topic for me. What I am interested in knowing is if your NPS low for something (for example an agile training given - Refer Slide No. 24), do you have some technique, pointers to look upon to imporve the NPS or some existing practices to follow to increase the NPS? I am not able to find that from the presentation or am I missed that out?

    Thanks,

    Jerry

    • Bernd Schiffer
      By Bernd Schiffer  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      I've included a video from the very first session at LAST conference in Melbourne a couple of weeks ago.

    • Bernd Schiffer
      By Bernd Schiffer  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Jerry.

      Thanks for the comment.

      The whole goal within the net promoter system is to delight customers, i.e. turning detractors into satisfieds and satisfieds into promoters. That's also the way to go when you want to increase your net promoter score. If you identified a detractor, get in contact with him or her to find out what it is that they are unhappy with. The qualitative feedback ("Why?") which you should always collect with the quantitative feedback (the ultimate question) gives you further clues about how to improve: what went well and should be done more often or more consequently; what went wrong and should be avoided in the future? In short, you can improve your NPScore if you improve your product/service you are offering your customers. In order to do that, get in contact with them and find out what it is they love and hate regarding your product/service.

      Cheers,

         Bernd

  • Ted Tencza
    By Ted Tencza  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Bernd,

          Is NPS really that unknown?  I would think a lot of people have heard about it and understand the basics.  If you get feedback that people are familiar with NPS, would you be willing/able to adjust the talk to give more advanced techniques and tips on how to use NPS to drive change in the organization?

     

     

    • Bernd Schiffer
      By Bernd Schiffer  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Ted.

      Yes, I know, that's a tricky dilemma. I did that session twice now, and I always got people having aha moments with the basics! I always ask beforehand if this is familiar, and half of the rooms so far answered: "Na, not really."

      I'm happy to skip parts if I get feedback from the audience that they want to go faster; if I were loosing too many people by skipping content, I wouldn't skip content.

      Does that answer your question, Ted? If so, I'd appreciate a vote from you :)

      Thanks again for your comment - again! You really support me with this!

      Cheers,

         Bernd


  • Liked Elinor Slomba
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Elinor Slomba - Scrum of One

    45 Mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    Artists tend to function in ways that are intuitively Agile.  Working closely alongside arts leaders for nearly twenty years before becoming a Scrum Master, I have devised a set of practices that solopreneurs, freelancers or anyone working without Agile support in a larger company can practice to become more productive and contribute positively to organizational culture.  I have been putting this into practice for managing deliverables with my own clients as a consultant.  Each practice has two parts.  For example, Scrum of One Timeboxing includes Step One: Give Yourself a Deadline.  Step Two: Blackmail Yourself by Putting it in Print.  Another is Scrum of One Product Ownership Step One: Figure out who your patron is. Step Two: Show them your works-in-progress and ask for feedback.  A particularly powerful practice is Scrum of One Standups Step One: set up regular times to meet on a given project.  Step Two: keep to the schedule, and if you're the only one who shows up, document and report on the hurdles you're facing.  Scrum of One can help many more people adopt the Agile mindset that is a precursor to smooth collaboration on teams.  

  • Liked Victoria Schiffer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Victoria Schiffer - Agile Coaching? Sure thing! What about Life Coaching in Agile Thinking?

    Victoria Schiffer
    Victoria Schiffer
    Agile Coach
    SEEK
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    I love being around awesome people, who build great products customers desire. 
    I love learning from and together with these amazing minds. 
    I love creating the right environment for teams to flourish. 
    I love change, and learning from new experiences. 
    I love working in Agile environments.

    How about you? 
    I bet there are some elements of this list why you're in Agile, too. And you can probably add even more elements to it.

    The Agile Manifesto states amongst others individuals and interactions, customer collaboration and responding to change.

    In our everyday life doing Agile we already respect these aspects in many ways. 
    But do we practice what we preach as best we can?

    I'd like to challenge your current way of thinking about people and processes. 
    I'd like to challenge you to focus on you, before you focus on others. 
    I'd like to challenge your current way of reflecting. 
    I'd like to inspire you to go different ways. 
    I'd like to inspire you to inspire others.

    In Agile we're already good in improving our processes and creating well performing teams and hence building the right things in the right way. And in the Agile Manifesto's communication and collaboration piece we can even get better.
    "You have not yet reached the limit of what you're capable of!" means we can always further improve. And we do follow this idea in our Agile processes, too, through continuous feedback (Retrospectives) and improvement.

    And why not take it even further? Why not go "Beyond Agile"?!

    Here's where aspects of Life Coaching come in handy: through also understanding and improving ourselves (how do we interact with people due to how we perceive our environment) we will even further improve communication and collaboration.

    Life Coaches believe our clients know the answer. And even if Agile Coaching is slightly different than Life Coaching, I see it as very relevant in Agile Coaching, too. If we apply this in Agile, instead of giving our clients (team, colleagues) the answers, asking them powerful questions to help them be more aware of what's happening at the moment, they will find their answer for it and will have a much better commitment to making the change for themselves, their teams and the company. It's not for us to TELL them what to do, but to ASK them what's going on for themselves. Here's where I see a huge chance for improvement.

    In my session I give lots of examples on how to link Life Coaching ideas to our Agile work environments. I've given the session at LAST Conference Melbourne and at the Agile Coaching Circles Meetup Melbourne. The audience was engaged and the attendees were very happy about having some new ideas on how to improve their daily work life.

    Come along to be inspired by Life Coaching and thus to benefit our Agile Thinking!

  • Liked Giovanni Asproni
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Giovanni Asproni - Methodology Patterns: a Different Approach to Create a Methodology for Your Project

    Giovanni Asproni
    Giovanni Asproni
    Consultant
    Asprotunity Limited
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 Mins
    Tutorial
    Advanced

    In the software world we have been looking for “The Methodology” to solve our software development sorrows for quite a while. We started with Waterfall, then Spiral, Evo, RUP and, more recently with XP, Scrum, Kanban, DAD, SAFe (there are many others, but, their impact, so far, has been limited).

    In this tutorial, I'll show why this search for the holy grail is bound to fail--each methodology has strenghts and weaknesses that make it suitable only in some contexts--and I'll describe a different approach based on patterns and pattern languages, that teams can use to create their own methodologies to suit their specific needs, which, in my experience, has a higher chance of success. 

    The approach is based on the observation that all the practices used in all modern methodologies--e.g., user stories, use cases, team self organization, TDD, unit testing, acceptance testing, continuous integration, iterative and incremental development, etc.--come from the same set. Different methodologies just mix and match them differently. All those practices can (and many have already been) described as patterns whose relationships with each other form a set of pattern languages.

  • Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    Founder
    ConfEngine.com
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    "Release Early, Release Often" is a proven mantra and many companies have taken this one step further by releasing products to real users with every commit a.k.a Continuous Deployment (CD).

    Over the years, I've built many web/infrastructure products, where we've effectively practiced CD. However at Edventure Labs, when we started building iPad games, we realized there was no easy was to practice CD, esp. given the fact that Apple review takes a few days.

    Our main question was: As mobile app developers, how should we architect/design our apps for CD?

    We were a young startup, learning new behavior about our users (kids aged 5-8) everyday. We could not afford any delay in releasing latest, greatest features to our users. To solve this problem, I believe we've built an innovative solution to enable any mobile app developer to achieve CD.

    If you are building real products, which have platform/3rd-party dependencies and you want to practice CD, this session is for you.

  • Liked Lynne Cazaly
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Lynne Cazaly - The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    Lynne Cazaly
    Lynne Cazaly
    Owner
    Lynne Cazaly
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

  • Liked Fiona Mullen
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Fiona Mullen - Agile - An Australian Journey of Cultural Change

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    How did one of Australia's leading financial services organisation become the biggest Agile transformation story in the Southern hemisphere and what did we learn?

    The Suncorp Group leads in general insurance, banking, life insurance, superannuation and investment brands within Australia and New Zealand. The Group has 16,000 employees and relationships with nine million customers. It is a Top 20 ASX listed company with over $93 billion in assets.

    In 2007, we embarked on our Agile journey of cultural change. In this talk we will cover the strategy taken, the roadblocks we came across, the mistakes we made and the achievements along the way.

    You will learn how to tackle an Agile transformation, what to do and what NOT to do, where to start and what to expect and most of all what impact it will have, both negative and positive.

    Today Suncorp are seen as market leaders in Agile and are known globally for the Agile Academy http://www.agileacademy.com.au/agile/ which was designed for both staff and also the external market.

    The role of the Agile PMO, how to get infrastructure to work Agile, what about all those legal challenges, the cultural differences and the resistance to change? These are some of the learning we will share.

    There were challenges and successes and in this honest Aussie presentation will share with you both the highs and the lows.

  • Liked Herry Wiputra
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Herry Wiputra - Crossing the T's and Dotting the I's

    20 Mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    The term "cross functional team" has been made popular by the Agile movement. In cross functional team, we put people with different roles to work together for a common goal/purpose.

    I have seen this worked really well in many agile teams. People are no longer on silo and everyone have better understanding what each other's role is and consequently, what each other do. This leads to better self organising within the team.

    However, I strongly believe we can take this concept to the new level. The concept of cross functional team should be extended to not just the team but also to the individuals within the team. Scott Ambler wrote an essay on "Generalising Specialist". The term T-shaped developer was introduced by Mary and Tom Poppendieck in her famous book "Lean Software Development". By nature, people don't like to get out of their comfort zone, hence the tendency to keep working in area that they are familiar with. When leaders can create an environment where everyone is encouraged to learn, grow and make mistakes, amazing things can happen.

    In my experience leading teams, I have witnessed many transformations that enabled individuals to go beyond their traditional role, such as a manual QA assuming Scrum Master role, a BA doing deployment, a developer doing QA for a story, etc. Not only this enablement help develop the individuals to widen their horizon and skillset, it also helped the productivity of the team through better collaboration. When a team reach this stage, we no longer have problems such as "The QA has nothing to do because there are no stories to test", "The developers have nothing to do because the cannot keep up", "The deployment took longer than expected because the Ops person was not aware of the special configuration".

  • Liked Anna Obukhova
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Anna Obukhova - The SCRUM and the willpower: how neuroscience can boost your productivity

    Anna Obukhova
    Anna Obukhova
    Agile Coach
    Luxoft
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Willpower is the force that is between the brain activity (I want to do this or I need to do this) and the action itself (start coding). If there is not enough willpower, people find it difficult to start any activity (especially that involves
    decision making).


    What is the standard approach when you feel tired and find it difficult to concentrate? Take some coffee (but latest research shows that coffee depletes the brain activity, even when body has more energy), take some sweets (but sugar ends quickly and gives even more exhaustion to the body)? These widely used strategies generally do not work, and in long-term even add harm to the body and brain.


    The willpower is not endless (so-called muscle theory of willpower), it can be saved, it can be trained, there are approaches how to keep the willpower level high. To keep the willpower (and thus, productivity) on the high level, people should know and use different approaches that lay in the field on the social and cognitive science.


    There are a lot of evidences that SCRUM improves the developer’s productivity in terms of speed of development, code quality, and accuracy of design. Unfortunately mainly all recommendations from SCRUM coaches look like “believe me, if you do this, you will have better velocity”. Yes, it works. But why does it work?


    Sometimes SCRUM does not give such great results even when main elements are in place. The question “Why” and “What makes the difference” is here again.


    I will describe the model of relationship between the willpower related brain metabolism on very low level (specific amino acid cycle) and the SCRUM practices. I can prove that SCRUM addresses the productivity of the people’s brain using 3 different flows simultaneously. There are several tips that make these productivity flows working or not. You can make Agile productive, you can have non-productive Agile. I will show you where the difference is.


    Overall there are 10 productivity tips that can be put into 3 flows.


    As the outcome of this session, Agile coaches, and all people who can change the process (in fact that is any team member) will review their SCRUM: does the way they have it improve the productivity or they are losing all the power? The changes are cheap, the outcome can be huge.

  • Liked Bernd Schiffer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Bernd Schiffer - Inspire Management! From Status Quo to Awesome

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    One of the most rewarding change opportunities for organization to create awesome workplaces exists by being innovative at the management level. Forget step-by-step explanations of management practices (you can’t copy culture!); the key to address the management level - i.e. to foster innovations at this level - is by inspirations. In order to get an awesome workplace, you have to see awesome workplaces. There are plenty of ways to inspire people, but this opportunity is often wasted during the introduction of Scrum and Kanban methods, or never reflected upon afterwards.

    In this session, I will show you several aspects of awesome workplaces. A constantly growing container for inspiring management are the Agile Management Innovations (AMI). AMIs are practices for management which lead to democracy, fairness, decentralisation, dialogue, and lot of other positive effects. These effects lead to awesome workplaces, where people are truly motivated. The idea behind inspiration is to foster creativity and innovation through a changed environment. Management practices can't be just applied; 50% of management practices depend upon the organisation's culture. That's why we call them AMInnovations.

    If you experiment with AMIs, you'll get from status quo to awesome (that is of course only when you're status quo is not already awesomeness).

    I’ll introduce the concept of AMI as well as plenty of real world examples. The goal is to inspire you twofold: I will inspire you in this session to experiment with AMIs, and AMIs will inspire the people within your organisation to achieve a better workplace.

  • Liked Neil Killick
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Neil Killick - The Guessing Game - Alternatives to Agile Estimation

    Neil Killick
    Neil Killick
    Lead Agile Coach
    MYOB
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile promotes empiricism and change, yet many practitioners continue to scope out and estimate delivery times and costs for software products and projects.

    Defenders of the art of estimation claim that we need to estimate software projects in order to answer common business and customer questions such as:

    • Should we go ahead with this project? (go/no-go)
    • How much will it cost? (bottom line)
    • When will it be done? (predictability)
    • Should we do project B instead of A? (prioritisation)

    This session challenges participants to flip these questions on their heads and seek alternatives to estimation rituals. It covers the many risks inherent with an estimation culture and demonstrates real, practical alternatives, both at the portfolio and the sprint level.

  • Liked Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy - WORKSHOP- Defining Behaviors as a team

    45 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In lot of agile teams, often times, all the team members will be doing the grooming and planning exercise as a team. Often times, defining the behaviors is either ignored, overlooked, skimped or done by individuals on their own without a common understanding as a team.

    To solve this problem, I have used this hands-on time-boxed activity for all of my teams to define behaviors as they move along in the sprint. This will help all the team members to have a shared understanding on their users and their behaviors as it relates to their user story. This is an activity that any agile team member can take and implement the next day at work.

     

     

  • Liked Jerry Rajamoney
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Jerry Rajamoney - ScrumMaster Maturity Model

    Jerry Rajamoney
    Jerry Rajamoney
    Agile Coach
    SolutionsIQ
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Advanced

    Learning Objective:

    The intention of this Model is to help organization / individuals to measure and improve the effectiveness of ScrumMasters in their role.

    For the Existing ScrumMasters:

    1. Helps the existing ScrumMasters to evaluate their current position in terms of their role maturity
    2. Helps the organization by providing the range of maturity level and helps the ScrumMasters to improve in their role maturity

    For Agile / Scrum Coaches:

    1. Helps the ScrumMasters to understand the position where he / she stands and what that really mean by providing the necessary insight
    2. Helps to find out the action items and coaching technique so that the ScrumMasters can move to the next level of maturity

    Expected Business Impact:

    1. This model can be used in a single Business Unit / across multiple business units as it will be generic.
    2. This model helps the ScrumMaster community in a single BU or across BU or across product lines to evaluate their position. It provides the path for ScrumMasters to improve and perform their work better

    Credits:

    ScrumMaster Maturity Model is developed by Mr. Brian M. Rabon, CST, PMP, President, The Braintrust Consulting Group, USA (http://braintrustgroup.com/). I have started working with him from this year beginning and tried this model as a case study with 8 scrum teams across 3 product groups in my organization (EMC Corporation, Bangalore).

    I have the first cut ppt readily available with data's and interpretation.

  • Liked Tania van Wyk de Vries
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Tania van Wyk de Vries - Agile metrix: How do you measure the success of your agile implementation?

    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Advanced

    Humans are creatures of habit and agile is really challenging that part of our existence everyday. I have seen many teams thinking they now get agile and they take what they learned and just practice it everyday without really reflecting on where they are at or the fact that they are not really moving forward. So in order to say your teams and organisation are really becoming more and more agile everyday you need some metrix to measure against.

     

    The collection of the metrix are 2 fold:

    1. Metrix are tracked through the agile project management tools teams use. We have defined the below set of metrix to interrogate our data to tell us how we doing.
    2. Some of the metrixs are done by getting feedback from teams and clients through surveys.

     

    Some of the metrix include:

    1. Measurement of quality
    2. Measuring customer satisfaction
    3. Measuring team happiness
    4. Measuring continuous improvement in process and technical practices
    5. Measuring time to market
    6. Measuring ROI
    7. Measuring productivity
    8. Measuring overall project progress
    9. Measuring change and improvement

     

  • Liked Vibhu Srinivasan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Vibhu Srinivasan - Coding with Geeks- De Code the secrets behind TDD, BDD and ATDD

    90 Mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    This session is a coding sessiont that takes a problem and shows clearly what is the difference between TDD, ATDD and BDD. Ths session uses code for the server layer as well as UI layer.

    This session is not for you if you do not code. If you do code, please bring your laptop as we delve into the details of all these styles of programming techniques.

    We will rotate between ATTD, TDD and BDD periodically and show it at use in different layers. This session will be using Java , Rails, Scala and C# together so that you can see how you can benefit do these techniques even when coding in different languages.

    We look at common pitfalls and wrong beliefs that programmers have when it comes to these concepts

    This session is purely keyboard and you will have to bring a laptop.

  • Liked Kanchan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Kanchan - Come! Take a plunge with us into the world of Self Organization!

    Kanchan
    Kanchan
    Portfolio Manager
    McKinsey&Company
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In agile teams there is a belief that the teams self organize. But do we really understand what this really means? The scrum guide simply says three things autonomous, self transcendent, cross functional.

    In this interative workshop we will experience what self organization is all about via a fun filled game. You will go back with key learnings through your own experience. 

    This session will be a combination of audience participation in activities, discussions combined with presentations and loads of fun!

    This interactive game session is for anyone who wants to learn more about  being self organized and what makes the self organized teams tick.

  • Liked Ted Tencza
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Ted Tencza - Pushing a Rope: Lessons learned from implementing innovation programs at Bigcommerce and Atlassian

    Ted Tencza
    Ted Tencza
    Director of Engineering
    Bigcommerce
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    You cannot effectively push a rope, similarly you cannot force innovation to happen. You can only set up an environment where it is fostered and allowed to thrive. This is even more relevant in an Agile environment, where there is freedom to explore innovation. This talk will be a review of the lessons learned while implementing innovation programs in Agile environments at Atlassian and Bigcommerce. This session covers programs that worked (like FedEx/ShipIt/Hackathons, 20% time) and programs that failed (dedicated Innovation Team). Most importantly it will explore why certain types of programs are more successful that others.

    It will also explore how Agile methodolgies and practices can help to improve the results of innovation programs. The talk will also detail some strategies for setting up a culture of innovation, and discuss the pre-requistes to creating and fostering an environment where innovation is celebrated.

  • Liked Dinesh Sharma
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Dinesh Sharma - Thinking Environment - Do you have one?

    90 Mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Everything we do depends for its quality on thinking we do first. Our thinking depends on the quality of our attention for each other.

    A Thinking environment is the set of ten conditions under which human being can 'think' for themselves - with rigour, imaginaton, courage and grace. A Thinking Environment is natural, but rare. It has been squeezed out of our lives and organisations by inferior ways of treating each other.

    Thinking environment is based on ten behaviours that generate the finest thinking, and have become known as The Ten Components of a Thinking Environment. These components are

    • Attention,
    • Equality,
    • Ease,
    • Appreciation,
    • Encouragement,
    • Feelings,
    • Information,
    • Diversity,
    • Incisive Questions and
    • Place.

    Each Component is powerful individually, but the presence of all ten working together gives this process its transformative impact.

     

  • 90 Mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    Have you ever thought why scrum works? That too from NeuroScience perspective?
    We all acknowledge and understand that we have moved beyond and past machine age or service era and are living in what is called “Knowledge Era”. Focus of current times is shifting from behaviours to values. From people to brain. Yet, we know very little about people or brain or its working.
    Through this talk, I will attempt to link hard neuroscience to scrum and its practices to see why it works or does not work. Also we would look at practices required beyond scrum to create an environment where scrum can flourish. Or even exists!