Artists tend to function in ways that are intuitively Agile.  Working closely alongside arts leaders for nearly twenty years before becoming a Scrum Master, I have devised a set of practices that solopreneurs, freelancers or anyone working without Agile support in a larger company can practice to become more productive and contribute positively to organizational culture.  I have been putting this into practice for managing deliverables with my own clients as a consultant.  Each practice has two parts.  For example, Scrum of One Timeboxing includes Step One: Give Yourself a Deadline.  Step Two: Blackmail Yourself by Putting it in Print.  Another is Scrum of One Product Ownership Step One: Figure out who your patron is. Step Two: Show them your works-in-progress and ask for feedback.  A particularly powerful practice is Scrum of One Standups Step One: set up regular times to meet on a given project.  Step Two: keep to the schedule, and if you're the only one who shows up, document and report on the hurdles you're facing.  Scrum of One can help many more people adopt the Agile mindset that is a precursor to smooth collaboration on teams.  

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

In offering this demo I am further opening a pathway blazed by my mentor, dramaturg and software development consultant Lee Devin, co-author of Artful Making: What Managers Need to Know About How Artists Work.  For context, I will first briefly present why artists can be considered indigenous "lean entrepreneurs."  Then I will go through the Scrum Guide, offering "Scrum of One" versions of all the key activities undertaken by a typical Scrum team, providing examples from my own practice and my clients' experiences.  I will present a prototype "Scrum of One Playbook." The group who attends this session will demo the exercises in the Playbook through journaling, drawing and acting out short scenes. 

 

Learning Outcome

Participants will learn how to practice Scrum principles as a solo endeavor, following a pattern set by artist-entrepreneurs.

Target Audience

consultants and anyone working without Agile support in an organization

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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  • Meghan Robinson
    By Meghan Robinson  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Elinor, 

    I’m intrigued by your scrum and agile expertise! I’m wondering if you would be willing to write a piece or give us permission to highlight an existing article on the new AgileCareers Blog. AgileCareers is powered by Scrum Alliance and is the only job board dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals.

    Click below to view the blog: http://membership.scrumalliance.org/blogpost/1322603/AgileCareers-News

    If you wish to discuss further, please email me at mrobinson@scrumalliance.org. I look forward to hearing from you!

     

    Thanks,

    Meghan

  • Ted Tencza
    By Ted Tencza  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Elinor - welcome to the Beyond Agile track.

    In your learning outcome, you mention "Participants will learn how to practice Scrum principles as a solo endeavor, following a pattern set by artist-entrepreneurs." 

    Does this also translate to teams?  Or is the specific to developers/agilistas working alone?  Is the end goal to be able to get organizations to adopt agile, with a "lead by example" approach, or is it more towards teaching, for lack of a better term, survival techniques to those in workplaces without agile support networks. 

    • Elinor Slomba
      By Elinor Slomba  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Ted, another point is this: we have a paradox on our hands.  According to the Agile Manifesto, individuals and their interactions are more important than tools and processes, but most of our talk about Agile transformation is not focused at the level of individuals.  This session is an attempt to correct for this imbalance.  THANKS

    • Elinor Slomba
      By Elinor Slomba  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      THANK YOU for the welcome!  I see it as laying the groundwork for Agile to spread in an organization.  The strategic emphasis is on how the individual can contribute to positive culture and prompt an agile mindset among colleagues, rather than on a top-down culture transformation.  Hope that helps with your evaluations.

  • Vijayanand Nagaraj
    By Vijayanand Nagaraj  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Elinor,

    Interesting abstract, especially the analagy with Artists. You abstract seems to bring-in new concepts or new way of working for Agile Teams hence I feel it fits well for either Agile Lifecycle theme or even Beyond Agile theme. What do u say?  

    • Elinor Slomba
      By Elinor Slomba  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      For now, I changed it to Beyond Agile.  Best Regards!

    • Elinor Slomba
      By Elinor Slomba  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Yes, I can see that!  Truthfully, I wasn't sure which one to select - your choice for a theme.  I would emphasize either aspect.  THANKS for asking.  


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