Nokia Maps Agile Journey.....(Agile Transformation, Scaling and Overcoming Challenges)

schedule Feb 26th 02:30 PM - Jan 1st 12:00 AM place Grand Ball Room

We (at Nokia Maps Division) began our Agile Journey in 2009, with a Top Down approach for Agile Transformation. The formation of an Agile Working Group (with members having Agile experience behind them) at two major sites was instrumental in shaping the transformation and scaling and also overcoming the challenges from time to time.

The challenges were huge, but our spirit was bigger, and the high level strategy was decided. Interestingly, the Agile Working Group itself ran the whole Transformation and Scaling program using Agile values and Scrum frame work. Scrum was also used as the preferred framework for the agile projects (after success in our pilots), except where Scrum would not work. Kanban or hybrid methods were used in those few teams.

What were the challenges faced, and how did we overcome them? What values helped us in our transformation journey?

How did we migrate to the Scaling phase? What helped us in scaling and stabilizing?

Can we rest easy now? Of course not!

What are the next steps? And of course, the challenges ahead?

Let us share our Nokia Agile journey with you, and help you all be successful too, in your Agile journey!

 
68 favorite thumb_down thumb_up 10 comments visibility_off  Remove from Watchlist visibility  Add to Watchlist
 

Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Approach and Strategy decisions
    • Describe what challenges were identified from the management side, teams side and customer side.
    • Elucidate the approach that we used, and why
    • Explain the High Level Strategy decided
  2. Running the Agile Enterprise Transformation Program
    • Elucidate how we identified members for creating a team for transformation program
    • Elucidate how the group used Agile Values and Scrum to run the transformation as an Agile Program
    • How we identified the target projects, to start the transformation
    • Describe how the transformation group collaborated with management and teams
    • Describe how the transformation group created phases, and improved with each phase
  3. Massive Re-OrgCulture change and New Role Play
    • What kind of Re-Org we adopted for creating co-located teams
    • How we killed the dependency across locations 
    • How the teams changed their culture from working in functional teams to working in agile teams
    • Influences of Team empowerment
    • Agile Managers and their new role play
  4. Running the Agile Projects Successfully
    • How we identified the challenges and overcame them
    • Running the Releases and Sprints
    • What tools were used for planning and reporting
  5. Scaling
    • When did we start Scaling?
    • What model did we create to scale successfully
  6. Next Steps and Challenges

Learning Outcome

You will get to learn from our first-hand experience of a highly successful Agile Enterprise Transformation and Scaling, at Nokia Maps division, across multiple locations.

You will know how we transformed our mammoth challenge into a successful program.

Relate to your own challenges and learn how to overcome them.

  1. Understand what challenges we faced in our Agile Enterprise Transformation
  2. Discover what approach and strategy worked best in our Agile Transformation, and why
  3. Discover how we to identified members to form a team for agile transformation program
  4. Understand how we ran our transformation program
  5. Discover how we identified target projects, to start the transformation
  6. What kind of Re-Org we did to create co-located teams, from a highly distributed set of teams? What were the challenges?
  7. How we created a successful model to run our agile projects, for two locations?
  8. Discover how the model was adjusted for a distributed set of project SMEs.
  9. Understand when we decided to start Scaling?
  10. Discover our successful model of implementing Scaling.
  11. What are the next steps, and the challenges? We obviously cannot rest easy.

Target Audience

Management, Scrum Masters, Product Owners, Developers (including Testers)

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Allen and Sunil.  Thanks for making your slides available!

  • Karthik Sirasanagandla
    By Karthik Sirasanagandla  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Sunil, do you mind sharing links to your previous presentations, if any? Thanks. --Karthik

    • Sunil Roy
      By Sunil Roy  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks for asking, Kartik.

      I have been giving sessions on various Agile related topics internally in Nokia Maps.

      All those presentations are full of company specific information, and I may not be  able to share those.

      I am sorry for that.

  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Sunil

    Will you be submitting links to other presentations you have done? Or this one, if you've already presented it?

    Thanks

    Ellen

    • Sunil Roy
      By Sunil Roy  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Ellen, I am preparing a new presentation for this session. Will take time.

      • Ellen Grove
        By Ellen Grove  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hi Sunil - do you have a link to any other presentations you've done?  I like your proposal, but I'm looking for information about your presentation history.  Is there anything you can share about other talks you've done?

        Thanks!

        Ellen

  • pradeep panda
    By pradeep panda  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Sunil,

           An experience speaks louder. Definitely you have lot many things to share with all of us. So waiting for your session. However in your abstract, you have mentioned "Scrum was also used as the preferred framework for the agile projects, except where Scrum would not work. Kanban or hybrid methods were used in those teams." My point here is, why and how you decided Scrum as your preferred framework and not lean or kanban. And second query from my side might be, what kind of project you think does not fit in Scrum and how does it fit in Kanban or hybrid methods. Do you believe in ScrumBut?

    • Sunil Roy
      By Sunil Roy  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thank you Pradeep for asking this question.

      Scrum had already been successful in many organizations, and was the method we chose in our early pilots when we were first giving Agile a try.  We were a very strict Waterfall organization so it was preferred to first try a methodology that had history of successes and a strong following.  Teams that were part of our original pilots were carefully chosen to meet certain criteria and they had to agree to organize as a Scrum team.  At minimum that meant team size of 5-9, a designated full time Product Owner, a full time Scrum Master, and all team members allocated 100%.

      Kanban was thought to be a good choice in case of ad-hoc work , like Production Support.  However we purposely chose not to explore Kanban until we had the Scrum process well implemented and accepted.  When we did move forward with Kanban we contracted with David Anderson & Associates for training and initial consulting. Kanban is also suitable in service organization, though Scrum is used too.

      Lean started to come into play as we scaled Agile higher in the organization.  Being one of the first companies to incorporate Dean Leffingwell’s SAFe, known as Release Train in late 2010, we employed the House of Lean concepts promoted by Donald Reinertsen and Dean. We also use Lean in our Maps Production department, which does not get involved in Software development.

      We try not to support ScrumBut.  To our thinking it allows acceptance of poor and weak practices.  That does not mean we cannot be flexible with some application of Scrum on a team by team basis.  However we have created our list of minimum Scrum standards that all teams are expected to follow.

  • Archana Joshi
    By Archana Joshi  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Sounds interesting. There are many points that are getting covered as part of your talk. As part of your "Running agile projects" you have mentioned planning & reporting tools and metrics. I am assuming you will be covering reporting not only at teams but at the program and organization level as indicators for successful transformation.

    • Sunil Roy
      By Sunil Roy  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks for asking Archana. Since, I will have just 45 mins. to explain the whole Transformation, Scaling and Overcoming the Challenges, etc., I will have difficulty getting into Metrics and Tools.

      However, you can always catch me during the breaks or after the session for questions that I cannot cover in the session, due to time limitation. I am heppy to help.

      And, for quetions related to my topic, I will be able to cover them during the session Q&A itself.


  • Liked Todd Little
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Todd Little - Leveraging Global Talent for Effective Agility

    Todd Little
    Todd Little
    Executive Consultant
    Accelinnova
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 Mins
    Keynote
    Intermediate

    A major challenge in agile development is the ability of test teams to keep pace with ongoing development while simultaneously ensuring that new development has not created regression failures. This case study from Halliburton shows how together with two globally distributed outsourcing partners they developed a comprehensive test automation strategy for their agile teams that effectively leveraged both in house and outsourced activities. This approach resulted in a significant quality improvement from prior releases.

  • Liked Ellen Grove
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Ellen Grove - Build Your Dreams: User Requirements Gathering with LEGO Serious Play

    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Let your hands be the search engine for your brain! LEGO® Serious Play® is a powerful thinking, communicating and problem solving technique that can help you and your team do serious work through structured play activities using a popular and playful 3D modeling toy. Through a facilitated process of building models that, storytelling and reflection, every person at the table is engaged and actively participating in the discussion, whether the topic is individual aspirations, team relationships, developing a new product or solving a wicked organizational problem. Everyone builds and everyone tells their story – all participants have equal opportunity to put their own points of view on the table, unlocking new perspectives and exposing the answers that are already in the room.  LEGO Serious Play has been used successfully for team-building and problem solving in a variety of organizations, from NASA to RBC to academic settings and public utilities.  

    This presentation provides a hands-on introduction to LEGO Serious Play, so that you can experience firsthand how using LEGO to do real work unleashes creativity and enables meaningful conversations in a very short time. We will explore how to use this playful technique to collaboratively elicit information about user requirements and strategic design issues using the open source User Requirements with Lego methodology developed by a team at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.  This approach is particularly suited to Agile teams that want to get team members and stakeholders sharing their different perspectives on common goals in an open and light-weight manner.

  • Liked Jason Yip
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Jason Yip - Think Like an Agilist: Deliberate practice for Agile culture

    Jason Yip
    Jason Yip
    Principal Consultant
    ThoughtWorks
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    If I say, culture is important to adopting Agile, most people will just agree without even thinking too much about it.  But what is meant by "culture"?  Why is it important?

    Culture is not typical behaviour; it is not what we say we value (but don't actually do).  Culture is our basic assumptions of how things work.  Culture is the logic we use to think through and respond to any particular situation.

    If you imagine a pyramid, Agile practice and any other visible behaviour is on the top, stated or written Agile values and principles are in the middle, fundamental assumptions (aka culture) is at the base.

    My session is intended to expose people to the base of that pyramid.

    If culture is assumptions, then to understand Agile culture, we need to understand the basic assumptions of Agile.  To do this, I have created an approach called "Think Like an Agilist" that both exposes how we think through an "Agile situation" and allows us to deliberately practice "Agile culture".

    The general idea is that I won't just talk about Agile culture and values, what I'll call "culture theatre", but rather expose people, who nominally consider themselves part of the Agile culture, to their underlying thought processes and assumptions, given a relatively difficult scenario.  Those thought processes and assumptions are the essence of culture (reference Edgar H. Schein).  What is interesting is noting when the thought processes and assumptions are different which indicates that there is a different culture at play.  What I've noticed is that this difference is common between novice vs expert Agilists.

    Note that it isn't even about analyzing vs doing it mechanically but more about exposing what assumptions are being used to respond.

    NOTE: I will be updating the attached slides as when I created them, I was framing it more as "doctrine" rather than "culture", defined as fundamental assumptions"

  • Liked Prasanna Vaste
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Prasanna Vaste - Should we stop using Story Points and Velocity?

    Prasanna Vaste
    Prasanna Vaste
    Business Analyst
    Thoughtworks
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 Mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    On Agile projects we estimate user stories in order to allow team to

    1. 1. Track velocity
    2. 2. Decide scope for the Iteration
    3. 3. Help Prioritize stories
    4. 4. Help Release planning

    But most of the time we faced issues with estimation. It takes lot of time in estimating user stories, managers tend to relate estimate to number of days it will take to complete the story, in some teams estimate is equal to deadline. Most of the teams which use story points to estimate the work face these issues. This results in lack of confidence on development team when stories are taking more time to complete.

    Here I am going to talk about better alternative for both the suppliers of software products (financially and ethically) and their customers (internal and external). This alternative is being used in real companies delivering to real customers with great effect where team uses count of stories completed in an Iteration as measure of progress. Will talk about how this alternative can be used to track velocity, prioritize stories, planning Iteration and for release planning.

    I will share some exmples from my past projects where team did not use story points/velocty but used count of stories completed in Iteration to measure progress and also as best indicator of future performance.

  • 45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    ‘One bad apple soils the barrel’ is a very true saying even in an Agile environment. Not identifying and managing poor behavior and performance can completely undermine any Agile transformation effort.

    How can Leaders, both within and external to Agile teams, set higher standards of accountability and hold people to it? Is self organization, peer pressure and the wisdom of the crowd enough to handle the wiles of organisational psychopaths?

    The fact remains that most teams will have a few difficult personalities and underperforming members.

    Agile is seen in many senior management circles as a softer, less accountable, way of working. Is that true?

    This talk will delve into how the human psyche works, drawing on latest studies in neuro and psycho analysis, combined with Harvard studies, to outline the best ways to define, identify and deal with ‘bad apples’ in an Agile environment while honouring the values and principles of Agile

  • Liked Raj Anantharaman
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Raj Anantharaman - Cross Geo Collaboration and Delivery of Intel's Tablet - Scaled Agile and ALM Tools Story

    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    We all know it takes a group of skilled engineers and developers to deliver any successful product. But what if they are all located in various geos, have different competencies / focus areas (hardware, software), on top of it - they are given a stringent deadline to deliver? In my session I'd like to share how Intel adopted the Scaled Agile framework and a homegrown "Managed Personal Accountability" (MPA) model to deliver the first tablet solution successfully. 

    It took a combination of good Agile planning and execution (Scrum of Scrums), an integrated ALM Toolset, along with performance management metrics of MPA to deliver this project successfully.

  • Liked Naresh Jain
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Naresh Jain - SAMPLE PROPOSAL - Product Discovery Workshop

    Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    Founder
    ConfEngine.com
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 Mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Many product companies struggle with a big challenge: how to identify a Minimal Viable Product that will let them quickly validate their product hypothesis?

    Teams that share the product vision and agree on priorities for features are able to move faster and more effectively.

    During this workshop, we’ll take a hypothetical product and coach you on how to effectively come up with an evolutionary roadmap for your product.

    This 90 mins workshop teaches you how to collaborate on the vision of the product and create a Product Backlog, a User Story map and a pragmatic Release Plan.

    This is a sample proposal to demonstrate how your proposal can look on this submission system.

  • Liked Samir Penkar
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Samir Penkar - What agile project teams can learn from marathon coaching?

    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Ever wonder how trainers coach marathon runners to run a distance of 26.2 miles or 42.1 kms?

    Chock full of incredible techniques and practical advice, this session will motivate everyone to expand their thinking on coaching agile teams for optimal performance.

    You will walk (or run) away with a fresh understanding of how you can inspire and uplift your project teams. As a running coach and SCRUM Master, Samir shares his insights into how you can affect small changes, inspire the right behavior and build trust among your team. You’ll learn how marathon coaches build endurance, stamina, strength and speed and how you can adopt these techniques for your project teams.

     

  • Liked Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy - WORKSHOP- Defining Behaviors as a team

    45 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In lot of agile teams, often times, all the team members will be doing the grooming and planning exercise as a team. Often times, defining the behaviors is either ignored, overlooked, skimped or done by individuals on their own without a common understanding as a team.

    To solve this problem, I have used this hands-on time-boxed activity for all of my teams to define behaviors as they move along in the sprint. This will help all the team members to have a shared understanding on their users and their behaviors as it relates to their user story. This is an activity that any agile team member can take and implement the next day at work.

     

     

  • Liked Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy - Agile Testing- What is my success mantra??

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    As more and more organizations are transitioning to agile, it’s inevitable that Agile testing is not just a concept any more. It is also not just about placing a tester in every team. What is so radically different now? How to be successful at agile testing? How to be an effective cross-functional team that embeds and honors all specialties including testing?

    In this presentation, I am going to share my teams’ success with Agile testing and how we incorporated these 3 aspects – people, process and tools/techniques. This talk will benefit any members in an organization who has a stake in the product quality. It is also highly beneficial for those agile testers (from aspiring to veteran) to understand the 3 main aspects as it relates to testing and why we need to embrace- not just one, not two, but all these 3 aspects to be successful in Agile testing. 

     

     

  • Liked Ebin John
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Ebin John - Making the organizational culture work for you!

    Ebin John
    Ebin John
    Agile Coach
    Societe Generale
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    This talk is all about how to make the organizational culture work in favour of you. Agile adoption/transformation face lot of resistence because the the change agents work against the organization culture.

    In this talk we talk about how to understand the organizational culture and how to work with the culture to reach agility. We learn the details of organization culture with the help of Schneider model.

    We also discuss about what is the best model for different types of organizational culture. How to move from one model to another without disturbing or fighting against the organization culture.

    The talk is all about "Making your culture work".

    X

  • Liked Manik Choudhary
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Manik Choudhary - Making of Innovative Solutions: Lean Start-Up and Design Thinking Practices

    Manik Choudhary
    Manik Choudhary
    Manik Choudhary
    SAP Labs
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Advanced

    Content :

    I will showcase Real Case Study on how Innovative Solutions can be developed using a mix of tools and techniques from Lean Start-Up ,    Design Thinking, User Story Mapping and Lean & Agile Development.

    - Lean Canvas is 1-page document that describes Business Model.

    - Design Thinking is an iterative innovation approach to develop the “Right Product”. Various phases of DT are 1. Understand 2. Observe 3. Define 4. Ideate 5. Prototype 6. Validate.

    - User Story Mapping helps teams get a common understanding of requirements from the user's point-of-view and facilitates creation of clearer backlog items.

    - Lean is right way to reduce waste and to efficiently and rapidly deliver high quality products.

    Summary :

    How the tools and techniques from Lean Start-Up, Design Thinking, User Story Mapping and Lean Development helped us in developing Right Innovative Solution in the right way.

     

  • Liked Ankush Sabharwal
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Ankush Sabharwal - Step-by-Step Process for Release Planning and Release Level Retrospectives

    45 Mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    In the session two processes will be explained viz. Release Planning and the Release Level Retro. Step by Step approach will be discussed so that the same can be readily used in your Agile Projects.

    I have created these approaches of conducting effective Release Planning and Release Retrospectives in Agile projects. I have used these processes in various successful Agile projects.

     

    Note: Please refer to the Links section below to see the steps invoved in both of these processes.

  • Nasser Hadjloo
    Nasser Hadjloo
    Localization Specialist
    Pexity
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 Mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    In the global village, some talks inEnglish the others in their own local langauge, when it comes to the global websites with international users, their users should be able to interact with the website with their own language.

    The process of internationalization for a large-scale application (website) is usually time consuming; I'll show you how to split the internationalization process into different sprints and implement a successful internationalized application.

     

  • Liked Kanchan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Kanchan - Come! Take a plunge with us into the world of Self Organization!

    Kanchan
    Kanchan
    Portfolio Manager
    McKinsey&Company
    schedule 4 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In agile teams there is a belief that the teams self organize. But do we really understand what this really means? The scrum guide simply says three things autonomous, self transcendent, cross functional.

    In this interative workshop we will experience what self organization is all about via a fun filled game. You will go back with key learnings through your own experience. 

    This session will be a combination of audience participation in activities, discussions combined with presentations and loads of fun!

    This interactive game session is for anyone who wants to learn more about  being self organized and what makes the self organized teams tick.

  • Liked Raj Anantharaman
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Raj Anantharaman - Agile Transformation of Intel India

    45 Mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    Steve Jobs once called Intel the "heavy steam iron" ship - to mean that Intel tends to be slower, less flexible and more difficult to change direction. In the past 2 to 3 years, Intel has worked hard in transforming its Traditional Waterfall methods and processes to be more nimble, more Agile, and has seen positive business results - in many cases improvement in quality and work-life effectiveness, in fewer cases TTM. In my session - I'd like to share Intel India's experience in this transformation - the before and after. 

  • Liked Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy - We're Moving to Agile: What Do I Do with My testers?

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    As more and more organizations are transitioning to Agile, there still exist a lack of understanding on how testing fits in the Agile teams. Is it just about placing a tester in every team? How can we realign the team members including testers from being on silos to an effective cross-functional team? Pradeepa Narayanaswamy shares her insight on the key basics of Agile testing along with understanding the Agile testing mindset and testing goals. Pradeepa also shares her ideas on how to manage defects, what to measure as metrics and what to document. Learn what you need to know as a tester who are new to Agile. If you are an experienced Agile tester, review these important basics and realign the concepts that may have been overlooked or forgotten in your teams.

     

     

     

  • 90 Mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    Have you ever thought why scrum works? That too from NeuroScience perspective?
    We all acknowledge and understand that we have moved beyond and past machine age or service era and are living in what is called “Knowledge Era”. Focus of current times is shifting from behaviours to values. From people to brain. Yet, we know very little about people or brain or its working.
    Through this talk, I will attempt to link hard neuroscience to scrum and its practices to see why it works or does not work. Also we would look at practices required beyond scrum to create an environment where scrum can flourish. Or even exists!

  • Liked Mohan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Mohan - Developing a Culture of Leadership through Lean for Organizations

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    The goal of this topic is to look at Lean from an Indian Context and what aspects are critical for  Leadership especially while implementing Lean in their Organizations. Few concepts of how Organizations wade through their challenges to implement a Pyramid of Agile Practices both in Software and Non Software will be discussed here. This will also focus heavily on how to develop a culture of Leaders within the organization using relationship techniques of Senpai(mentor) and Kohai(protege) and also of a Sensei(teacher) .

  • Liked Joe Zachariah
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Joe Zachariah - Can India be truly Agile?

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    It's Indian Independence day today as I work on this proposal. As I read newspapers today, I understand the importance of the IT and ITES Offshore business, which has almost single handedly provided employment to millions of technically suave and English speaking folks. One question that repeatedly comes to surface is whether the Indian IT industry will be able to up its game from the servicing mentality which started the boom of IT in India. As Agile and Scrum began to become the flavour of the worldwide IT industry, many firms in India also went out on the Agile path, many of them out of pressure from their Western clients. Some of them were successful, but there are also numerous examples of failures of the Agile model and also half hearted adoptions, which have led Western businesses to believe that maybe India is not adept enough to take its game to the next level where teams can follow the Agile framework.

    My talk would be driven by my experiences of following Agile in different ways in my different teams over the last 6-7 years. My forays into the Agile ways of software delivery in India have been largely successful and I cannot see a reason why Agile will not work in India.

    In my talk, I would focus on the reasons on why Agile would work in India. Right from the way we approach diversity and inclusivity, to the way we approach our post election coalition party governance model, the Indian way of living is rife with finding innovative ways to quickly adapt to change, which essentially is the Agile mantra.

    I plan to start with a simple example. Of the Western way of cooking & dining as compared to the Indian way of cooking & dining. A traditional Indian kitchen is a sacred space. It is decorated with auspicious signs. Sometimes, it doubles up as a puja room. In many households, you are not allowed to enter the kitchen with footwear, you are expected to bathe before lighting the kitchen fire, you are not allowed to eat unless you have taken a bath - these can be metaphorically compared with the Ceremonies that an Agile team practising Scrum follows - the daily standups, sprint planning and reviews, etc. However the core delivery is the food. And no matter what ceremonies you follow and what your menu for the day is, the food comes out daily at the same time and is served everyday with the same set of stakeholders. There aren't as many tools and supporting equipment that you might see as in a Western kitchen, but at the end of the day the practices followed in a typical Indian kitchen are very Agile at heart.

    There are many other examples from Indian culture and mythology that one can refer to understand that Indians are essentially Agile at heart. Open source product groups, many of which are largely Agile, can also find a reference point in Indian culture and mythology. That which is timeless is referred to in the Indian context as Sanatan. It refers to wisdom that has no founder and is best described as collaborative and open source freeware. Every idea is accepted but only that which survives the test of time, space and situation eventually matters.

    There are many myths circulating in the IT industry that Agile cannot survive in India, since Indians cannot be trusted to be self governed and always require direction. Also Indians don't know how to have fun at work. Through my presentation I seek to dispel those myths drawing from Indian mythology and culture and essentially try to make folks understand that reasons for Agile not working in India is the same as Agile not working elsewhere. What you need to make Agile work at the end of the day, is just the belief that it will work.