location_city Bengaluru schedule Feb 27th 11:55 - Jan 1st 12:00 AM place Esquire

Fixed price (and fixed scope) projects dominate the offshore industry. These projects have offshore/onsite teams. They often have large team size (over 100s of people in one team).

Agile thinking uses team velocity/ throughput and uses that to project an end date (Kanban system) or how much scope can be accomplished in a given time duration (number of sprints in SCRUM). They assume a stable team. However, this is not applicable for projects. They experience resource and productivity ramp-up issues. Often, resources keep changing as new projects come in. Projects do not have past velocity or throughput data. Extrapolating historical data from other similar projects, though possible, is inaccurate for multiple reasons.

This talk is based on our experience of working with such project teams. They want to adopt agile methods. We show how they can adopt the Kanban Method and yet do: A) Initial Capacity Planning B) Assess the impact of scope creep to the project end date.

The session assumes a basic understanding of the Kanban method.

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Experience Report

1. Explain the challenges and difficulties of Fixed Price projects when they start adopting Agile principles.

2. Show how capacity planning can be done in such teams

3. Show how to assess the impact of Scope Change

Learning Outcome

At the end of this session, you will be to apply these methods for Capacity Planning and impact for Scope changes to your Capacity Plan in a fixed project project.

Target Audience

Senior people in delivery organizations, Process Managers

schedule Submitted 6 years ago

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