Business stakeholders are always looking for ways to generate more business, and hence earn great revenues (or find the perfect exit strategy). Paying for testing comes last on the expense tracker. Some businesses work without testing teams because they see testing as mostly a drain on time and money. The typical executive perceives testing as a key bottleneck to product releases.

In this session, Parimala Hariprasad shows how understanding the business model and business goals helps you test products better. She explains how to educate stakeholders about business risks. She explores ways testers can catch business blockers through early testing, and alert managers so they can be addressed quickly. This type of business information helps managers make better-informed decisions about the product early on. Some managers raise their eyebrows when first asked about their revenue models. Happily, once they see the value of business testing and how it could improve their revenue, they engage enthusiastically.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

1. Introduction to Business Testing

2. Why do Business Testing?

3. How to get started?

4. Common Challenges

4. Showcase of business reports

5. Benefits of Business Testing

Learning Outcome

  1. How to test business  and revenue models
  2. How to ask the right kind of business questions
  3. How increased interaction with stakeholders helps testers offer more benefits to the business
  4. How to facilitate well-informed and timely decisions that will help businesses move faster in a competitive market

Target Audience

Testers, Product Analysts, Business Analysts and anyone interested in Business Testing

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

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comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Doc Norton
    By Doc Norton  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Primala:

    Any chance you'd be able to fit this into a 20 minute slot? It would help with the scheduling.

    - Doc

    • Savita Pahuja
      By Savita Pahuja  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Parimala

      Could you please provide us some sample presentation related to the topic.

       

      Your help would be highly appreciated.

      Regards

      Savita

      • Parimala Hariprasad
        By Parimala Hariprasad  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hello Savita,

        I am not aware of anyone having done this kind of stuff because it marries Business and Testing which I have not witnessed before in my experience although I have worked in contexts where PO/BA work closely with Testers. Perhaps, I *have not* witnessed it.

        Scott Barber did something similar at Let's Test, Sweden. I attended his keynote and I know that his session was different. You can take a look at his slide deck here - http://lets-test.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/LetsTest_BusinessValue_BarberKeynote.pdf.

         

        I will be uploading my presentation shortly, I hope it's worth the wait for you.

        Regards,

        Pari

         

    • Joel Tosi
      By Joel Tosi  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Parimala,

         Could you help me understand some examples of business model testing? Is this user research / validation, is this setting up A/B tests, etc.  or something else?  What are some of the 'right questions' to ask?

      Best,

      Joel

      • Parimala Hariprasad
        By Parimala Hariprasad  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hello Joel,

        Apologies for the delay as I was travelling. Here are my answers:

        Business model testing can use data from user research and A/B testing. It is not same as User research or A/B tests.

        Business model depicts revenue generation process for the product. Free mobile apps thrive in the market because of ads. These ads generate enough money for the free apps to continue to be free. Information pertaining to how companies make money with their products will help testers align their testing around the business objectives. If a management professional claims that their product addresses a few business objectives, but the product doesn't support the claim, it fails. Two examples are listed below.

        Example 1

        Consider a paid mobile app that brings news to your mobile phone. There might be data transfer over the network to and from the news server. This has a performance impact which in turn might bill the user. A typical news app my team tested recently showed that a user loses 9 INR per day while using this app. A user loses Rs.9 per day while using the app. This has very high impact on the user and many users might end up uninstalling the app. This is one example of the value we add as part of business model testing.

         

        Example 2

        Let's say you are testing an e-commerce website. A typical laptop costs 2 pounds on the test environment. Is that a real use case for a tech-savvy shopper? In business testing, we need to come up with scenarios which are as close to the real world as possible. We must even go a step ahead and the application in the real world before it is released to the market. If you are testing an online music streaming app on your phone, you might as well test it out on your vacation in Mauritius or in the rest room of a top mall or Wi-fi in the lobby of a five star hotel. These are business scenarios which can be designed better if we know the business model of the product and how they are willing to make money.

        Does this help?

        Regards,

        Pari

        • Joel Tosi
          By Joel Tosi  ~  4 years ago
          reply Reply

          Perfect, thank you very much Pari

      • Parimala Hariprasad
        By Parimala Hariprasad  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hello Joel,

        Apologies for the delay as I was travelling. Here are my answers:

        Business model testing can use data from user research and A/B testing. It is not same as User research or A/B tests.

        Business model depicts revenue generation process for the product. Free mobile apps thrive in the market because of ads. These ads generate enough money for the free apps to continue to be free. Information pertaining to how companies make money with their products will help testers align their testing around the business objectives. If a management professional claims that their product addresses a few business objectives, but the product doesn't support the claim, it fails. Two examples are listed below.

        Example 1

        Consider a paid mobile app that brings news to your mobile phone. There might be data transfer over the network to and from the news server. This has a performance impact which in turn might bill the user. A typical news app my team tested recently showed that a user loses 9 INR per day while using this app. A user loses Rs.9 per day while using the app. This has very high impact on the user and many users might end up uninstalling the app. This is one example of the value we add as part of business model testing.

         

        Example 2

        Let's say you are testing an e-commerce website. A typical laptop costs 2 pounds on the test environment. Is that a real use case for a tech-savvy shopper? In business testing, we need to come up with scenarios which are as close to the real world as possible. We must even go a step ahead and the application in the real world before it is released to the market. If you are testing an online music streaming app on your phone, you might as well test it out on your vacation in Mauritius or in the rest room of a top mall or Wi-fi in the lobby of a five star hotel. These are business scenarios which can be designed better if we know the business model of the product and how they are willing to make money.

        Does this help?

        Regards,

        Pari

    • Sachin goel
      By Sachin goel  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi - I guess your talk is very relevant in the software industry context. Are there any pointers to advise how same will connect to the theme of the conference as well? Thanks - Sachin

      • Parimala Hariprasad
        By Parimala Hariprasad  ~  4 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hello Sachin,

        Thanks for the question and your time. Ever since I stepped into the Agile world from Waterfall and V-Model background, I recognize that Agile is about putting humans ahead of tools/technologies/processes. While I enjoyed working on Agile methodologies, I cringed at the fact that sometimes it was either poorly implemented or brought in additional wasteful documentation. My point is that the true power of Agile methologies can be harnessed only if collaboration is placed high above hierarchies in organizations. This talk on business testing will highlight how collaboration with stakeholders of business, product owners and different rungs of revenue departments will help testers test any product better and provide information that is valuable to the stakeholders. Collaborative testing, I believe is in sync with the theme of any Agile Conference. 

        I hope this helps.