Build the "right" regression suite using Behavior Driven Testing (BDT)

BDT is a way to identify the correct scenarios to build a good and effective (manual & automation) regression suite that validates the Business Goals. We will learn about how this is different from BDD, and do some hands-on exercises in form of workshops to understand the concept better.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • What is BDD – Behavior Driven Development?
  • What is BDT – Behavior Driven Testing?
  • The difference between BDD and BDT
  • Understand Case Study
  • Iteration 1 - Work in teams to write scenarios
  • Iteration 1 - retrospective
  • Different styles of writing scenarios - Imperative Vs Declarative
  • Update Case Study
  • Iteration 2 - work in teams to write new scenarios
  • Iteration 2 - retrospective
  • The value proposition for the team - live documentation, business rules, onboarding, etc.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the difference between BDD and BDT
  • Learn how to build a good regression suite for the product under test
  • Learn different style of writing your scenarios that validate the expected Business Functionality

Target Audience

BAs, QAs, Product Owners

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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comment Comment on this Proposal
  • AgileSattva Consulting LLP
    By AgileSattva Consulting LLP  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Anand,

     Like your proposal! Would you also introduce the audience to some tools that are available? 

    Deepak

    • Anand Bagmar
      By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks Deepak!

      If there is time, I can definitely talk at great lengths about this aspect. If not, I can speak about it for 10-15 seconds in terms of some names / tools that can be used. Offline - I can talk more with those who are interested.

      So if the topic is selected, then I can finalize my schedule and content, and proceed accordingly.

      -Anand

  • Ram Srinivasan
    By Ram Srinivasan  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Anand,

    Thanks for submitting a proposal to this track. I have a few questions

    1. I am hearing BDT for the first time, and as a reviewer, would love to learn more about it so that I can make an informed decision.

    2. I am looking at slide 22,23. 23 is a generic case of 22. People used to describe it in terms of 23, lacking information, and BDD/Specifications by example gives a concrete example to test which is far more better than giving a generic statement.  Slides 23,25  : I get the concept, but it will be difficult for a non-Subject Matter Expert to understand what a "valid card" is. And that is the reason I like BDD/ATDD

    3. You are using the same tools for BDD and BDT, so am more confused. Is it just a thought process behind BDD. Can you help me understand it better?

    Thanks,

    Ram

    • Anand Bagmar
      By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Ram

      I started off with BDT as a concept as it relates to building a "good" regression suite, which can also be automated. It uses the same tools as BDD, its just a different application of the same.

      Functional tests sit at the top of the Test pyramid - which also indicates that these tests should be lowest in numbers compared to the other types of tests. What the Test Pyramid does not indicate is that these small number of Functional Tests actually touch the widest range of the Product under test.

      BDT is a way to correctly identify these tests.

      Hope it gives more context. At the same time, a little confusion is good .... hopefully this topic gets selected, and you attend it to get more understanding of the same.

      Regards,

      Anand

  • Joel Tosi
    By Joel Tosi  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Anand,

       I am a fan of your format, I feel it provides a good learning structure along with group discovery and discussion.  Could you please elaborate some more on how you would run the exercises?

     

    Thanks much,

    Joel

    • Anand Bagmar
      By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks Joel!

      This is the format of the workshop exercises:
      > split participants in groups of 4-6
      > explain case study
      > each team start writing scenarios for the case study in Iteration 1
      > In the retro - each team explains what has happened, and other participants and I (with my team of volunteers) critique the same, and write learning on another set of flip charts
      > Explain new way of writing the scenarios
      > Explain updated case study
      > each team start writing scenarios for the updated case study in Iteration 2
      > In the retro - each team explains what has happened, and other participants and I (with my team of volunteers) critique the same, and write learning on another set of flip charts
      > Summarize and conclude

      Hope this helps.

      Regards,

      Anand

      • Joel Tosi
        By Joel Tosi  ~  3 years ago
        reply Reply

        Perfect Anand, thanks very much for this.  One other question - have you ran this workshop before?

         

        Best,

        Joel

        • Anand Bagmar
          By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
          reply Reply

          Yes. This workshop has been run within ThoughtWorks a couple of times, and also as part of the vodQA events in Thoughtworks, Pune and Bangalore with external participants.

          • Doc Norton
            By Doc Norton  ~  3 years ago
            reply Reply

            What are the prerequisits for participants?

            Do people need a specific language such as C#, Ruby, Java?

            - Doc

            • Anand Bagmar
              By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
              reply Reply

              No pre-requisites. I split the team in groups, and they write the scenarios on paper using markers in the given / when / then style.

              In real-world cases, these given / when / then scenarios become your regression tests, and you would want to automate as many of the identified tests possible to get cloase to 100% regression automated!

  • Naresh Jain
    By Naresh Jain  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Anand, I'm very intrigued by your topic. I feel this is an important topic.

    Can you please point me to a link (blog or article) where I can find a detailed example of a case study that you've used this approach to create regression suite. Would love to see right from the problem to the actual tests.

    • Anand Bagmar
      By Anand Bagmar  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Naresh / Doc,

      I have been following the BDT approach since 2+ years now. My blog (http://essenceoftesting.blogspot.in/search/label/bdt) has all references to where I have been talking about BDT and what workshops I have conducted.

      For case study examples ... I cannot share the client details, but one case study example can be found from slide #36 - #41 in the slides available here (http://www.slideshare.net/abagmar/building-the-right-regression-suite-using-behavior-driven-testing-bdt)

      Hope this helps.

  • Doc Norton
    By Doc Norton  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Anand:

    Please reply to Naresh's request below.

    "Can you please point me to a link (blog or article) where I can find a detailed example of a case study that you've used this approach to create regression suite. Would love to see right from the problem to the actual tests."

    - Doc


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    Teams that share the product vision and agree on priorities for features are able to move faster and more effectively.

    During this workshop, we’ll take a hypothetical product and coach you on how to effectively come up with an evolutionary roadmap for your product.

    This 90 mins workshop teaches you how to collaborate on the vision of the product and create a Product Backlog, a User Story map and a pragmatic Release Plan.

    This is a sample proposal to demonstrate how your proposal can look on this submission system.