Despite being a CMMI Level 5 company, in the early 2000 business exigencies prompted Wipro to look towards a sustainable continuous improvement drive.  Wipro started it Lean-Agile transformation initiative way back in 2004-05. In the initial days, the euphoria of a new subject helped in the adoption. The evangelists came from the ranks and their success stories helped us in broadbasing the initiative. In the past decade or so the organization has grown 5 fold – not to mention the increase in the complexity of operations. The early adopters and evangelists too were not in a position to take ahead the journey. They often took up different roles either within the organization or externally. Knowledge became tribal in nature without there being a continuous cycle for continuous improvement. 

This is a live case study of how the organization took ahead the transformation initiative and breathed fresh life into it, in an environment which was much more challenging. We built a cadence of Continuous Improvement by

  1. Adopting a SuHaRi model of Inform-Perform-Transform  
  2. Aligning the roles and responsibilities to aid Continuous Improvement
  3. Building a rewards and recognition programme for increased participation
  4. Involving Senior leadership to drive the cultural change by aligning policies and principles
  5. Measuring engagement and effectiveness – not only in terms of measurable metrics, but also in terms of intangible benefits
 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Initial Approach and strategy (10 mins)

  • The need for a focused Continuous Improvement initiative
  • Decision between top down and bottom up – learnings from earlier initiatives
  • How did we interpret Lean Manufacturing principles for software development
  • Early success and measurement 

 

Broadbasing and related challenges (5 mins)

  • Creating the infrastructure for success
  • Supporting practitioners
  • Challenges posed due to environmental changes

 

Revitalizing the Continuous Improvement initiative (10 mins)

  • Revitalisation of the Lean-Agile journey by building a stronger cadence
  • Strengthening the Agile ecosystem with Lean principles and tenets
  • Role based competency development programmes across all levels in the organization
  • Stronger support structures – refining roles and responsibilities, reward and recognition
  • Senior management involvement for driving cultural change
  • Measuring the benefits and the Velocity of change
  • Extending Continuous Improvement from Delivery to Operational processes

 

Demystifying Continuous Improvement : The next frontier (15 mins)

  • WAVE : A continuous approach to Continuous Improvement
  • Adopting a ‘Butterfly diffusion’ model for change
  • Driving Agility and BVM ™ to enhance customer experience

 Q&A : 5 mins

Learning Outcome

You will learn how one of the largest IT service providers adopted new philosophies and embarked on a transformation journey, across multiple locations and divisions. You will also learn about the pitfalls that large organisations can face while driving change and how to address the same in a scientific manner. You will learn of our experiences of breaking internal and external barriers as well as addressing the ‘not invented here’ syndrome that are usually faced during such change initiatives. You will also get a view about other typical challenges and the strategies that can be adopted to help scale such change initiatives and drive the change as a part of the organizational DNA.

Target Audience

Senior Managers, Change Leaders, Strategic roles

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Venkatraman L
    By Venkatraman L  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Rituparna,

    Amidst the organization transformation, are you also covering how you had managed to convince or sell this to the customers who might / might not be interested ? How did this also change the way the contracts were laid out b/w the teams and customers ? Or is this out of syllabus :) ?

    • Rituparna Ghosh
      By Rituparna Ghosh  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Venkatraman,

      Thanks for your comment. One of the reasone that prompted us to undergo this transformation was an acute need from our customers to deliver increased value. The transformation definitely helped (a) communicate our approach towards the same and (b) demonstrate through improved and 'agile' delivery. The contract and communication model is definitely one element which changed - especially while working with clients - however that will not be a key focus area of our discussio (esp. with the 45 minute session). I will be happy to get into a detailed discussion with you during the conference

  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi!  This is a well-laid out proposal.  I can see exactly how you would use the time to share the story, and I think this is a story that many people would be interested in.  Is this a new talk being proposed for Agile India or do you have slides/video that you can share?

    • Rituparna Ghosh
      By Rituparna Ghosh  ~  4 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Ellen,

      Thanks for your feedback.

      This is a new talk being proposed for Agile India. We are working on the detailed slidepack and will be in a position to share the same in a week's time. Do let us know if the timeline is fine with you.

      Regards

       


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