Agile - An Australian Journey of Cultural Change

schedule 03:30 PM - 03:30 PM place Esquire

How did one of Australia's leading financial services organisation become the biggest Agile transformation story in the Southern hemisphere and what did we learn?

The Suncorp Group leads in general insurance, banking, life insurance, superannuation and investment brands within Australia and New Zealand. The Group has 16,000 employees and relationships with nine million customers. It is a Top 20 ASX listed company with over $93 billion in assets.

In 2007, we embarked on our Agile journey of cultural change. In this talk we will cover the strategy taken, the roadblocks we came across, the mistakes we made and the achievements along the way.

You will learn how to tackle an Agile transformation, what to do and what NOT to do, where to start and what to expect and most of all what impact it will have, both negative and positive.

Today Suncorp are seen as market leaders in Agile and are known globally for the Agile Academy http://www.agileacademy.com.au/agile/ which was designed for both staff and also the external market.

The role of the Agile PMO, how to get infrastructure to work Agile, what about all those legal challenges, the cultural differences and the resistance to change? These are some of the learning we will share.

There were challenges and successes and in this honest Aussie presentation will share with you both the highs and the lows.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Overview of why Agile
  • How it was applied
  • Techniques and change approach utilised
  • Training and Coaching
  • Lessons learnt

Learning Outcome

  • To provide a deepened understanding of why a change management approach is important for large scale roll outs
  • To share experiences of what we did and the success and obstacles faced

Target Audience

Those who want to know more about scaling agile

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

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comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Ellen Grove
    By Ellen Grove  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Thanks for posting the slides!

  • Pramod Sadalage
    By Pramod Sadalage  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Fiona,

     

    This proposal looks good, some suggestions I have is if you would focus the "why agile" section on Suncorp related issues and not generalize it. Would you be willing to convert this talk to a experinence report, since I think lot of folks would be intrested in a large organizations transformation to Agile methods.

     

    Pramod

     

  • Nikhil Joshi
    By Nikhil Joshi  ~  4 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Fiona,

    "The role of the Agile PMO, how to get infrastructure to work Agile, what about all those legal challenges, the cultural differences and the resistance to change? These are some of the learning we will share."

    You're touching a lot of complex areas in agile transformations, could you please highlight a few specific challenges that you'll be discussing in these areas? It seems like focusing on few specific areas will be more valuable for the audience in the short 45 min session? If you've thought about the session outline, it will be helpful to get more clarity.

    Cheers,

    Nikhil

    • Fiona Mullen
      By Fiona Mullen  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi there, Many thanks for the note. Understand what you are saying. In the presentation it will be around why there was a need to change, how we made the change and the challenges/successes. Leadership is what underpins any great transformational change and with this presentation how leadership managed the change.

  • Vivek Vijayan
    By Vivek Vijayan  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Fiona

    Tranformng into Agile at SunCorp indeed would have been an exciting journey and definitely a cultural change. While the learning section is specific on "change management approach", the summary or process is pretty generic. If you could be more specific then the audiance would find it more beneficial as there will be crictical few takeaways from the talk.

     

    Thanks! 

    • Fiona Mullen
      By Fiona Mullen  ~  3 years ago
      reply Reply

      Many thanks for your feedback... will take on board your feedback. Cheers Fi


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