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  • Liked Anna Obukhova
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    The SCRUM and the willpower: how neuroscience can boost your productivity

    Anna Obukhova
    Anna Obukhova
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Willpower is the force that is between the brain activity (I want to do this or I need to do this) and the action itself (start coding). If there is not enough willpower, people find it difficult to start any activity (especially that involves
    decision making).


    What is the standard approach when you feel tired and find it difficult to concentrate? Take some coffee (but latest research shows that coffee depletes the brain activity, even when body has more energy), take some sweets (but sugar ends quickly and gives even more exhaustion to the body)? These widely used strategies generally do not work, and in long-term even add harm to the body and brain.


    The willpower is not endless (so-called muscle theory of willpower), it can be saved, it can be trained, there are approaches how to keep the willpower level high. To keep the willpower (and thus, productivity) on the high level, people should know and use different approaches that lay in the field on the social and cognitive science.


    There are a lot of evidences that SCRUM improves the developer’s productivity in terms of speed of development, code quality, and accuracy of design. Unfortunately mainly all recommendations from SCRUM coaches look like “believe me, if you do this, you will have better velocity”. Yes, it works. But why does it work?


    Sometimes SCRUM does not give such great results even when main elements are in place. The question “Why” and “What makes the difference” is here again.


    I will describe the model of relationship between the willpower related brain metabolism on very low level (specific amino acid cycle) and the SCRUM practices. I can prove that SCRUM addresses the productivity of the people’s brain using 3 different flows simultaneously. There are several tips that make these productivity flows working or not. You can make Agile productive, you can have non-productive Agile. I will show you where the difference is.


    Overall there are 10 productivity tips that can be put into 3 flows.


    As the outcome of this session, Agile coaches, and all people who can change the process (in fact that is any team member) will review their SCRUM: does the way they have it improve the productivity or they are losing all the power? The changes are cheap, the outcome can be huge.

  • Michael O'Reilly
    Michael O'Reilly
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    Test Requirement Driven Development(TREDD) places a renewed emphasis on quality and accountability, and provides the insight to allow your product development and management teams to make the necessary changes in order to produce outstanding quality products on schedule, in a cost-efficient and highly collaborative manner.

    What separates TREDD from other development methodologies like TDD (test driven development), ATDD (acceptance test drive development), or BDD (behavior driven development), is the status of the test requirement when the product development lifecycle concludes.

    Test Requirement status is the breakthrough element that allows test requirement to provide an objective measurement to the quality of the product development team, so that adjustments can be made for subsequent product development iterations that will ensure quality improves, as well as increase the effectiveness of the product development team.

    Come and learn how your TREDD will catalyze your SCRUM team toward greater capabilities, quality, accountability, and satisfaction!

  • Liked Natalie Warnert
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    Confessions of a New ScrumMaster

    Natalie Warnert
    Natalie Warnert
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    So, you just got out of your CSM class, overflowing with your newfound Scrum knowledge and renewed faith in software development practices. You're ecstatic to share your new view of the world and show how Agile can benefit your organization, and you can't wait to get started. But, in your first Agile project, you meet resistance, opposition, and worst of all, modified Scrum practices. What's a ScrumMaster to do?

    Don't lose hope! You're definitely not the first ScrumMaster to meet these barriers, and you're not alone. I've encountered these situations in projects and have some tips to make the transition to Scrum easier on the team, the leadership, and you. Learn to overcome these problems in this interactive workshop and you become a better ScrumMaster and will help lead the team to the high performance you know they're capable of!

  • Liked Anil Rao. M
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    Balancing between Project Manager and Scrum Master roles in large scale Agile/Scrum based software development engagements

    Anil Rao. M
    Anil Rao. M
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

     This would be an experience and POV sharing session on how in offshore heavy, large scale distributed Agile/Scrum based engagements, teams deal with

     

    • Challenges encountered in dealing with a co-existent Project Manager and Scrum Master roles
    • Balancing between living by the Manifesto, established Project Management practices, and the hard reality of life
  • Liked Howard Deiner
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    The Agile PMO - Creating A Lean Organization from the Inside-Out

    Howard Deiner
    Howard Deiner
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    For many, the idea that you can transform an organization from the PMO outwards seems odd, if not impossible.  But my experience says that this is becoming a trend that more and more clients are asking advice for. 

    We know that for an Agile transformation to work, we need to engage not just the Delivery Teams to approach work differently, but we need a change agent high in the organization to support that change in mindset.  I’ve always found it difficult to find that right person in an executive leadership role who is willing to have the courage to “bet the company” on a new and unproven approach such as Agile and Scrum.  As coaches, we tend to start “pilot” projects, and hope that traction will occur “once everyone sees the great results that we get.”  But I think that this approach is fraught with peril of not getting the right project to start with, not getting the right results immediately, and not motivating people by seeing results from a process that they are not comfortable with.

    I think I’ve come upon a new approach that works better.  Instead of trying to “sell” Agile at an Enterprise level, embrace pure Lean principles high in the organization and work with the PMO leader at the organization.  Once they are comfortable with ideas such as “more leadership and less management”, “shorter concept to cash cycles”, “enabling Lean Startup mentality for disruptive product development”, “always looking for the elimination of waste”, “exploiting variability through appropriate cadence control and appropriate utilization rates”, “delegated authority”, “continuous improvement”, and “rolling planning”, the PMO becomes a terrific agent for instituting change, because they are usually already endowed with the right responsibilities and accountabilities that can push the organization forward.