Scaling Agile Adoption

08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
  • place 0forum Martin Fowler

    Software Design in the 21st Century

    schedule 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Intermediate
     

    In the last decade or so we've seen a number of new ideas added to the mix to help us effectively design our software. Patterns help us capture the solutions and rationale for using them. Refactoring allows us to alter the design of a system after the code is written. Agile methods, in particular Extreme Programming, give us a highly iterative and evolutionary approach which is particularly well suited to changing requirements and environments. Martin Fowler has been a leading voice in these techniques and will give a suite of short talks featuring various aspects about his recent thinking about how these and other developments affect our software development.

10:00
10:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

10:30
  • place 0forum Lyssa Adkins

    Windows on Transformation: Four Pathways to Grow a more Agile Enterprise

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    It is easy to envision a more Agile enterprise, yet we have found as a community it is quite difficult to accomplish. The transformation process goes on in many dimensions and unless we have a framework that helps us see from each of those perspectives, our efforts are much more likely to fall short. Based on Michael Spayd's upcoming book, Coaching the Agile Enterprise, this session will (literally) walk you through each of the four fundamental perspectives and the power and limitation of each. We will explore together approaches that are suitable to each perspective and how to activate them in your team, division or organization.

  • place 8forum Evan Leybourn

    From Lean Startup to Agile Enterprise (beyond IT)

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Traditional models of management and corporate governance are failing to keep up with the needs of the modern economy. Change, both technological and cultural, is occurring at faster rates than ever before. In this climate, modern enterprises will live or die on their ability to adapt. This is where Agile, and Agile Business Management, come in. Agile is change; changing how you think, changing how you work and changing the way you interact. This is important whether you are a software developer or a CEO.

    In this presentation, Evan will provide engaging and enlightening case studies of Agile beyond IT; from lean startups to large enterprises. These will be reinforced with practical approaches for the leadership of teams, divisions and businesses. 

    Taking the successful concepts and methods from the Agile movement and Evan's new book, Agile Business Management is a framework for the day-to-day management of organisations regardless of industry, size or location. We will discuss processes, techniques, and case studies for the 4 key domains from Agile Business Management;

    1. You, the Agile Manager - What makes a good manager and how do their responsibilities change?
    2. Integrated Customer Engagement - Collaboration and communication techniques to build trust and deliver Customer needs efficiently, with minimal waste, and to everyone's satisfaction.
    3. The Structure of an Agile Organisation - Efficient, transparent and collaborative techniques to manage empowered staff.
    4. Work, the Agile Way - Managing all types of business functions, from software, HR, finance to legal, by using Just-In-Time planning and Incremental or Continuous Delivery processes.

    Ultimately, the goal of this presentation is to make you think about your role as a leader. 

  • place 4forum Colin O

    Achieving Enterprise Agility with the Scaled Agile Framework...and Have Fun Doing It!

    schedule 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Tutorial
     
    Intermediate
     

    Scrum, XP, Kanban and related methods have been proven to provide step changes in productivity and quality for software teams. However, these methods do not have the native constructs necessary to scale to the enterprise. What the industry desperately needs is a solution that moves from a set of simplistic, disparate, development-centric methods, to a scalable, unified approach that addresses the complex constructs and additional stakeholders in the organization—and enables realization of enterprise-class product or service initiatives via aligned and cooperative solution development.

11:30
  • place 5forum Simon Reason

    The Enterprise Experiment!

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Ever wondered what it's like to experiment in Agile? Ever thought when you started to scale Agile, you would get it right first time? Ever thought Agile adoption is full of experiments? We did! This session explores real world learning and observations when attempting to mature organisations from single team project based Agile to a Scaled Agile framework.

    This will be a fun and interactive session where will be using live experiments that highlight the purpose, result and our observations. Each experiment, as any Agilist would attest to, creates more unanswered questions, additional problems to solve and more opportunities to try out new hypotheses.

  • place 0forum Doc Norton

    Creating a Global Engineering Culture

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Creating a Global Engineering Culture

12:00
12:15
12:30

    Lunch - 60 mins

01:30
  • place 7forum Phil Abernathy

    Caramelising bad apples

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    ‘One bad apple soils the barrel’ is a very true saying even in an Agile environment. Not identifying and managing poor behavior and performance can completely undermine any Agile transformation effort.

    How can Leaders, both within and external to Agile teams, set higher standards of accountability and hold people to it? Is self organization, peer pressure and the wisdom of the crowd enough to handle the wiles of organisational psychopaths?

    The fact remains that most teams will have a few difficult personalities and underperforming members.

    Agile is seen in many senior management circles as a softer, less accountable, way of working. Is that true?

    This talk will delve into how the human psyche works, drawing on latest studies in neuro and psycho analysis, combined with Harvard studies, to outline the best ways to define, identify and deal with ‘bad apples’ in an Agile environment while honouring the values and principles of Agile

  • place 13forum Bhavin Kamani

    Experience report from Walmart

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    Agile processes are the new order of IT implementations. These talk will elaborate on our experience and learnings during agile process implementation at Walmart. 

    We will touchupon following 3 key areas and our learnings that helped us scale agile in large enterprises.

    • Process Visualization - Our learnings related to visualization of existing processes and practices and how it helped us identify signals from noise

    • Product Backlog Elaboration - In a complex and large programs product backlog management and role of product owner needs to be revisited.

    • Team Working Agreement - This is particulary crucial for scaling agile as dependency management is one of the key aspects of enterpsie agile implementation.

    We will conclude with our key learning of how processes needs to be continuously evolved in large scale implementation.

  • place 2forum Naresh Jain

    Scaling XP Practices inside your organization using Train-the-Trainer Model

    schedule 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Advanced
     

    How do you effectively scale skill-based, quality training across your organization?

    Over the years, I've experimented with different ideas/models to scaling skill-based training across an organization. In the last 4 years, I've pretty much settled down on the following model. Its very useful when mentoring teams on skills like Test-Drive-Development (TDD), Behavior-Driven Development (BDD), Product Discovery, Writing User Stories, Evolutionary Design, Design Patterns, Problem Solving, etc. I've successfully implemented this model at some very prominent fortune 500 enterprises.

    The goal of this workshop is to explore what other successful models organized have used to scale skill-based training in their organization.

02:30
  • place 10forum Allen Rutzen

    Nokia Maps Agile Journey.....(Agile Transformation, Scaling and Overcoming Challenges)

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    We (at Nokia Maps Division) began our Agile Journey in 2009, with a Top Down approach for Agile Transformation. The formation of an Agile Working Group (with members having Agile experience behind them) at two major sites was instrumental in shaping the transformation and scaling and also overcoming the challenges from time to time.

    The challenges were huge, but our spirit was bigger, and the high level strategy was decided. Interestingly, the Agile Working Group itself ran the whole Transformation and Scaling program using Agile values and Scrum frame work. Scrum was also used as the preferred framework for the agile projects (after success in our pilots), except where Scrum would not work. Kanban or hybrid methods were used in those few teams.

    What were the challenges faced, and how did we overcome them? What values helped us in our transformation journey?

    How did we migrate to the Scaling phase? What helped us in scaling and stabilizing?

    Can we rest easy now? Of course not!

    What are the next steps? And of course, the challenges ahead?

    Let us share our Nokia Agile journey with you, and help you all be successful too, in your Agile journey!

  • place 9forum Herry Wiputra

    Crossing the T's and Dotting the I's

    schedule 02:30 PM - 02:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    The term "cross functional team" has been made popular by the Agile movement. In cross functional team, we put people with different roles to work together for a common goal/purpose.

    I have seen this worked really well in many agile teams. People are no longer on silo and everyone have better understanding what each other's role is and consequently, what each other do. This leads to better self organising within the team.

    However, I strongly believe we can take this concept to the new level. The concept of cross functional team should be extended to not just the team but also to the individuals within the team. Scott Ambler wrote an essay on "Generalising Specialist". The term T-shaped developer was introduced by Mary and Tom Poppendieck in her famous book "Lean Software Development". By nature, people don't like to get out of their comfort zone, hence the tendency to keep working in area that they are familiar with. When leaders can create an environment where everyone is encouraged to learn, grow and make mistakes, amazing things can happen.

    In my experience leading teams, I have witnessed many transformations that enabled individuals to go beyond their traditional role, such as a manual QA assuming Scrum Master role, a BA doing deployment, a developer doing QA for a story, etc. Not only this enablement help develop the individuals to widen their horizon and skillset, it also helped the productivity of the team through better collaboration. When a team reach this stage, we no longer have problems such as "The QA has nothing to do because there are no stories to test", "The developers have nothing to do because the cannot keep up", "The deployment took longer than expected because the Ops person was not aware of the special configuration".

02:55
  • place 12forum Aman King

    From Practitioner to Coach

    schedule 02:55 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    Are you an Agile Practitioner? Or are you responsible for Agile transformation?

    Organizations that have begun their Agile journey welcome the guidance of an experienced Agile Coach. But external guidance cannot continue indefinitely as the only way to scale Agile.

    If you are in an Agile team, are you prepared to take on the coaching role for other teams once your Agile Coach moves on?

    If you are a manager, are you looking at grooming in-house coaches to scale and self-sustain transformation?

    The transitioning of practitioners into coaches can be key to your Agile journey. Individuals get to build on their potential, while the organization becomes more self-reliant.

    This session explores my personal journey from practitioner to coach. It should help you too in taking that first jump into the role of a coach. I will share real-world examples of dealing with on-the-fly situations, and of preparing upfront where possible. I will recommend resources, and mention handy techniques that should be in a coach's toolkit. The session essentially provides a kick-start for first-time coaches.

03:00
03:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

03:30
  • place 4forum Mike Burrows

    Kanban through its Values: An Agenda for Scale

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Introducing the Kanban method through a 3-layered value system - a familiar core that stimulates and drives change, a middle layer that is about direction and alignment, and a protective outer layer of discipline and working agreements.

    This humane, values-centric model aligns Kanban with the concept of the Learning Organisation and suggests ways to seek resonances with other methods. It has some practical benefits too: it can help us engage more effectively with the organisation as it currently is; it encourages us to self-reflect on our effectiveness as agents of change; it provides a convenient framework for the capture of stories.

  • place 6forum Fiona Mullen

    Agile - An Australian Journey of Cultural Change

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    How did one of Australia's leading financial services organisation become the biggest Agile transformation story in the Southern hemisphere and what did we learn?

    The Suncorp Group leads in general insurance, banking, life insurance, superannuation and investment brands within Australia and New Zealand. The Group has 16,000 employees and relationships with nine million customers. It is a Top 20 ASX listed company with over $93 billion in assets.

    In 2007, we embarked on our Agile journey of cultural change. In this talk we will cover the strategy taken, the roadblocks we came across, the mistakes we made and the achievements along the way.

    You will learn how to tackle an Agile transformation, what to do and what NOT to do, where to start and what to expect and most of all what impact it will have, both negative and positive.

    Today Suncorp are seen as market leaders in Agile and are known globally for the Agile Academy http://www.agileacademy.com.au/agile/ which was designed for both staff and also the external market.

    The role of the Agile PMO, how to get infrastructure to work Agile, what about all those legal challenges, the cultural differences and the resistance to change? These are some of the learning we will share.

    There were challenges and successes and in this honest Aussie presentation will share with you both the highs and the lows.

  • place 9forum Jason Yip

    Think Like an Agilist: Deliberate practice for Agile culture

    schedule 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Intermediate
     

    If I say, culture is important to adopting Agile, most people will just agree without even thinking too much about it.  But what is meant by "culture"?  Why is it important?

    Culture is not typical behaviour; it is not what we say we value (but don't actually do).  Culture is our basic assumptions of how things work.  Culture is the logic we use to think through and respond to any particular situation.

    If you imagine a pyramid, Agile practice and any other visible behaviour is on the top, stated or written Agile values and principles are in the middle, fundamental assumptions (aka culture) is at the base.

    My session is intended to expose people to the base of that pyramid.

    If culture is assumptions, then to understand Agile culture, we need to understand the basic assumptions of Agile.  To do this, I have created an approach called "Think Like an Agilist" that both exposes how we think through an "Agile situation" and allows us to deliberately practice "Agile culture".

    The general idea is that I won't just talk about Agile culture and values, what I'll call "culture theatre", but rather expose people, who nominally consider themselves part of the Agile culture, to their underlying thought processes and assumptions, given a relatively difficult scenario.  Those thought processes and assumptions are the essence of culture (reference Edgar H. Schein).  What is interesting is noting when the thought processes and assumptions are different which indicates that there is a different culture at play.  What I've noticed is that this difference is common between novice vs expert Agilists.

    Note that it isn't even about analyzing vs doing it mechanically but more about exposing what assumptions are being used to respond.

    NOTE: I will be updating the attached slides as when I created them, I was framing it more as "doctrine" rather than "culture", defined as fundamental assumptions"

04:30
  • place 0forum Corey Haines

    Stories from 10 Years of Extreme Programming

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    10 years ago I was introduced to Extreme Programming. Since then, I've been an avid practitioner, applying the techniques and values to my life as a software developer. Over that time, I've bounced between many extremes, learning and reflecting on the value that I get when building systems both for myself and for others.

    In this talk, I'll share some of those learnings and how my life as a software developer has changed with the times.

  • place 6forum Venkatraman L

    Scaling from Project > Program > Portfolio - The Agile Transformation and Journey

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Intermediate
     

    The case in point is a journey of Agile transformation when the organization was looking to manage releases through shorter iteration cycles. As the journey began, the organization had to leapfrog into 3x growth in terms of both people and business needs due to a round of substantial investor funding.

    The agile transformation started with just 6 teams in the organization and due to the nature of the team structure, the 3-member PMO team did not have the luxury for pilot projects and had to simultaniously roll out at one go across the 6+ component teams.

    In a span of 6 months, the number of teams grew to 12+ and the number of releases more than doubled. Also, 80% of the releases cut across more than 3 teams and the challenge was to keep the process pretty lean. PMO team worked closely with key stakeholders from Product, Engineering, Architecture and Operations to forumate and roll-out a simple 3 step process that aided the teams to deliver releases better than before. Here is when the organization leaped from project to portfolio of releases cutting across 10+ themes.

    Similar to what is quoted in the "Scaled Agile Framework" which the PMO tripped on much later in the process, there were organization wide prioritization done based on the product strategy, infrastructure and technology needs which eventually got translated into multiple programs within the organization, cutting across various teams. A concept of 3-in-a-box (PM, Architect and Engineering Owner) was formulated to bring in the required vigor in to the planning and execution process.The 3 in the box was further extended to Dev +QA + Ops who worked as a team to deliver the various stories across the contributing stacks.

    The challenges across value-driven prioritization from 100+ releases across the portfolio, release planning with engineering and product, the execution framework and scalability in engineering infrastructure commensurate with the agile processes, working with operations teams and all the way till adoption was seamlessly scaled using the initial framework that was set for just 15 releases.

    The presentation details how agile helped and is helping the product and technology teams in delivering better results than before. This would also detail the necessary Agile and operational metrics across the project teams, the program and the portfolio levels that aid the mid and senior management to take informed decisions. As always, this would not cover the IP and actual data of the organization but provide a clear framework to substantiate the process.

05:00
05:30
  • place 0forum Dean Leffingwell

    Be Agile. Scale Up. Stay Lean. And Have More Fun

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:30 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Scrum, XP, and Kanban have been proven to provide step changes in productivity and quality for software teams. However, these methods do not have the native constructs necessary to scale to challenges of building enterprise class software systems. What the industry desperately needs is a solution that moves from a set of simplistic, disparate, development-centric methods, to a scalable, unified approach that addresses the complex constructs and additional stakeholders in the organization- and enables realization of enterprise-class product or service initiatives via aligned and cooperative solution development.

    In this talk, Dean Leffingwell describes how to accomplish this with the Scaled Agile Framework, a publicly - accessible knowledge base of proven Lean and Agile practices for enterprise-class software development. He approaches the problem from the perspectives of Lean thinking and principles of product development flow, illustrating how these core principles help deliver business results at scale, while keeping the development system - and the enterprise - lean and responsive to rapidly changing market needs. And since winning is more fun, he’ll also describe some of the personal benefits that come when teams master the art of delivering better enterprise-class software, at an ever faster pace.

  • place forum Richard Kasperowski

    Agile Art! Kick-Off

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:30 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    60 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     
06:30
  • place 0forum Rae Abileah

    Engendering Justice: Women, War and Peace

    schedule 06:30 PM - 07:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Beginner
     

    One in three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. Half of the seven billion global population are women so that means one billion women alive now will, or have been, beaten or raped or beaten. Women and children are disproportionately affected by war and occupation as well. And yet numerous studies illustrate how uplifting women's work and leadership can strengthen the whole society and economy. Women are at the forefront of global campaigns challenging militarism and violence, and working to redirect resources into health care, education, green jobs and other life-affirming activities. What can we learn from these women and their successes thus far? How can the technology sector support this crucial work? How do these social movements stay agile to rapidly respond to breaking news while building a long-term progressive movements for deeper social, economic and environmental justice? As Arundhati Roy said, "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." In this talk, Rae Abileah will share visionary examples of women-led work for peace and justice and explore the paradigm shift needed for equality, human rights, and justice for all.

07:30
08:00

    Dinner, Agile Art and Networking - 180 mins

Offshore/Distributed Agile

08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
  • place 0forum Todd Little

    Leveraging Global Talent for Effective Agility

    schedule 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Intermediate
     

    A major challenge in agile development is the ability of test teams to keep pace with ongoing development while simultaneously ensuring that new development has not created regression failures. This case study from Halliburton shows how together with two globally distributed outsourcing partners they developed a comprehensive test automation strategy for their agile teams that effectively leveraged both in house and outsourced activities. This approach resulted in a significant quality improvement from prior releases.

10:00
10:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

10:30
  • place 0forum Arlo Belshee

    Adopting Agile via Continuous Improvement - Your First 5 Days and Your Next 2 Years

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Do you adopt Agile all at once or one step at a time? What do you do after your adoption finishes (does that question even make sense)? What result should you expect at 30, 90, and 120 days? How do you get that? Is TDD the same on 20 days as at 360 days? Does it differ only in skill, or is it a completely different practice? We answer all these and a lot more. We show what you should expect for the first 2 years.

  • place 15forum Pooja Wandile

    Meeting the challenges of agile principles: An offshore Scrum Master perspective

    schedule 10:30 AM - 10:50 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    The 12 agile principles lay the foundation for a successful agile team and deliver a product that meets customer satisfaction. Every principle is an absolute necessity to build great software and great teams. While these principles have stood the testimony of time over a decade now, much has changed the way we build and deliver software, especially from an offshore perspective. Adoption of agile methods does not simply imply a framework or a process implementation, but it goes beyond that.

    In this talk, I share the experience of a Scrum Master, who in hindsight, look at the challenges such as lack of trust, micro management, lack of technical excellence, managing stakeholder’s expectations etc. and the impact on team’s performance. This is the result of ignoring agile values and principles which could have been avoided. Lastly, we look at the actions taken by the team and Scrum Master to turn on the challenges into a win-win situation for both onshore and offshore teams and become one of the successful agile teams.  

     

  • place 0forum Naresh Jain

    Agile MythBusters

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Advanced
     

    As the popularity of Agile methods have grown, so have the misconceptions or myths associated with Agile also grown. These myths get even more glorified when we talk about them in the offshore or distributed context. And to make matters worse, you can throw in a fixed-price contract spanner into the engine.

    Worry not! In this fun-filled activity, we'll collect facts from the participants that they believe are true and then we'll declare them as confirmed or busted after an interactive (heated) discussion.

10:55
  • place 7forum Vinodhini

    Robotic Warehouses, Alien Domain, Offshore developers, Visionary customer : Saved by agile

    schedule 10:55 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    Here is a case study of how agile outsourcing can be practically applied even when the business domain is very complex and alien to offshore teams.
    The example is a project in which Exilesoft provided for a leading Norwegian producer of Robotic warehousing solutions. The project involved transforming their legacy application, produced using multiple suppliers and methods, into a newly cast application solution. This project also had its own share of typical challenges.

    • Lacked definitive and reliable documentation,
    • Domain knowledge was limited to a few very busy individuals,
    • Development and redeployment could not interrupt attention to current customers,
    • Complexity was high and design was fragmented, and
    • Focus heavily invested on current product and customer support

    These limitations along with the lack of understanding of agile methods strongly suggested the use of a method adaptive in nature, and not heavily vested in large inflexible legacy elements.
    We commenced the engagement with two pivotal elements; client awareness (agile orientation) and a roadmap of committed involvement. To lay credibility this had to be backed up with proven result delivery in the very early stages. It allowed for flexible adaption, and the creation of an atmosphere that fostered client interest.

    During this session, we will take the audience through a small video clipping of such a warehouse. We will elaborate how the customer and offshore developers worked together using agile in a highly integrated team collaboration model to achieve success within a very short time frame.

    The session will cover the following key areas:

    How such projects can be initiated

    - What type of team model and contract type we used

    - How we did the agile transformation with the customer

    - How the roles were assigned between offshore and onshore team members

    - To improve remote collaboration the tools and techniques we used

    - Techniues learned to get teams up to speed with the new domain

    - As we go along, the process changes we identified and implemented to make things work better.

    - Agile engineering practices and team dynamics that helps in such situations

11:30
  • place 6forum Raj Anantharaman

    Cross Geo Collaboration and Delivery of Intel's Tablet - Scaled Agile and ALM Tools Story

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Intermediate
     

    We all know it takes a group of skilled engineers and developers to deliver any successful product. But what if they are all located in various geos, have different competencies / focus areas (hardware, software), on top of it - they are given a stringent deadline to deliver? In my session I'd like to share how Intel adopted the Scaled Agile framework and a homegrown "Managed Personal Accountability" (MPA) model to deliver the first tablet solution successfully. 

    It took a combination of good Agile planning and execution (Scrum of Scrums), an integrated ALM Toolset, along with performance management metrics of MPA to deliver this project successfully.

  • place 11forum Abhilash Chandran

    Retrospectives with large projects and (or) multiple teams

    schedule 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    Retrospectives are the one of the most integral components of any agile methodology.  In scrum a retrospective is typically done after each sprint. This process is simple if team is small or only one team is working on a product. The problem starts increasing exponentially when many teams work on a single product. All the teams have ideas to improve the process and production.  One team may have an entire opposite idea of another. How to bridge this gap?

    Last project executed across different teams (onsite & offshore) and different departments was not a great success. How to learn from the past failures and apply it to future projects?

    In this discussion, I will be talking about some the points which can be easily followed in such scenarios. 

    Why did we did this?

    Normally in a scrum environment we have a single team with Product Owner; they do the retrospectives within team. Team identifies the issues and work on them. Many team falls into this category. It is pretty simple

    Let’s complicate this further.

    • A big product with 10 scrum team
    • Each Team has different PO

    Apart from these main stake holders there are many others who are interested in the success of this application

    • Sales team
    • Documentation team
    • UI design team
    • Architecture and performance team

    In such a scenario, a retrospective at team level will be effective only at granular level. But it leaves a gap in few areas; it helps to bring all the teams together for one big retrospective

    • Apply the improvements made at each team level to the whole program
    • A team's retro action item against the process followed by another team can be discussed at a higher level to find an optimal solution
    • Sometimes two team's retrospective action items may be contradictory. This gathering may point a third solution
    • Sr Product owners and manager will get all the teams together. A common focus and improvement plan can be shared across teams.
    •  All team gets to know about the key concerns at the program level and with other teams.
    • Ultimately it gave a feeling of one big family.

    My experience

    Last large retro organized in our group was a big success. The sales team & architecture team had many ley lessons to take back from this meeting.  Many issues were bought out which could have been solved with better co-ordination across team.  Concrete action plans were made by team for the subsequent release.  Some of the key findings were shared across other program teams also.

  • place 0forum Ravi Kumar

    Evolutionary Approach for Maturing Agile Adoption in IT Services

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Change is a necessity and fact of organization sustenance and survival. Some changes are quite disruptive while others evolve gradually. Agile when compared to the many of the other models is radical and requires some fundamental shifts both in culture and traditional management practices. The Indian IT Services industry is at the crossroads of change with a heavy influx of agile projects in the recent past. Effective change in the context of agile with a heavy baggage from the past makes it harder. Business still has to continue and projects must be executed; so how do we go about an effective agile adoption/transition.

    This talk will try and look into the complexity and inhibitors of successful agile adoption in a typical large IT Services organization and questions the viability of certain agile methods such as Scrum and XP. We will explore why evolutionary methods such as Lean/Kanban are better fit and the necessity for evolutionary software development such as emergent design as a core premise for delivering Professional Software Development Services. Finally we also challenge the current status quo that is detrimental to a meaningful agile adoption and suggest few positive changes with Agile IT Services Manifesto.

11:55
  • place 9forum Sudipta Lahiri

    Capacity Planning for Dynamic Teams

    schedule 11:55 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    Fixed price (and fixed scope) projects dominate the offshore industry. These projects have offshore/onsite teams. They often have large team size (over 100s of people in one team).

    Agile thinking uses team velocity/ throughput and uses that to project an end date (Kanban system) or how much scope can be accomplished in a given time duration (number of sprints in SCRUM). They assume a stable team. However, this is not applicable for projects. They experience resource and productivity ramp-up issues. Often, resources keep changing as new projects come in. Projects do not have past velocity or throughput data. Extrapolating historical data from other similar projects, though possible, is inaccurate for multiple reasons.

    This talk is based on our experience of working with such project teams. They want to adopt agile methods. We show how they can adopt the Kanban Method and yet do: A) Initial Capacity Planning B) Assess the impact of scope creep to the project end date.

    The session assumes a basic understanding of the Kanban method.

12:30

    Lunch - 60 mins

01:30
  • place 0forum Kevin Austin

    Scaling Agile Engagement

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Beginner
     

    My talk is centred on doing better for our people; creating opportunities and building communities for a better life.

    I explore the actions and impact of a ground-up Agile Transition over the past 18 months, the challenges, what worked well, and how we began on a journey of connecting and growing Agile communities globally.

    A key theme discussed is our primary focus of putting the people we work with first while inspiring moments to challenge, learn, and explore new ways of thinking.

    • Scaling Agile Engagement is particularly applicable to anyone working with a large organization and/or distributed teams

     

     

  • place 12forum Vinod Sankaranarayanan

    Introducing Agile Knowledge Transfer

    schedule 01:30 PM - 01:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    After more than 5 years of supporting the thetrainline.com platform, ThoughtWorks worked with The Trainline teams to transfer knowledge and context  back to the Trainline Teams.

    This methodology was co-created by ThoughtWorks and Trainline as a healthy sustainable and mature way to transfer knowledge. The transition itself was about a year long and involved multiple agile concepts around remote pairing, program MVP and above all, continuous delivery and non-disruption to business through the process.

    This presentation would take the audience through the experiences and learnings of the process. This session is co-presented by ThoughtWorks and Trainline (vendor and customer) and will provide an insight across multiple spectrums of delivery and business.

  • place 7forum Lynne Cazaly

    The Girl with the Chisel Tip Marker

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility". Using cards, stories, post it notes, visual charts, maps, models, metaphors - and most of all, some hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals learn some engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an Agile world. 

    Many people speak about 'making work visible' - showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities - having visual agility gives you the skills to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This can apply to individual thinking and brainstorming, or group situations when you're presenting your idea or you're working with the group to create a solution. 

    Lynne Cazaly is a communications specialist and master facilitator. Lynne provides clarity to project complexity through workshops, training and visual strategy. Lynne trains, facilitates, speaks and coaches on visual facilitation, visual thinking and other engaging tools for project people, to help boost buy-in, collaboration and engagement.

    Lynne Cazaly is the author of the book 'Visual Mojo - how to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals'. 

    http://www.lynnecazaly.com.au/visual-mojo-the-book-lynne-caz/

    Included in this session is 30 icons to use straight away which Lynne calls 'Quick Pics'.

    Lynne recently ran the session again in New Zealand at an Agile Wellington Meetup - read their comments here

01:55
  • place 8forum Harish Krishnaswamy

    Travelogue - To LeanVille

    schedule 01:55 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    The webMethods R&D division of Software AG (wM) produces industry-leading enterprise products focused on application integration, business process integration and B2B partner integration. This division with more than 450 engineers across 7 locations in the world embarked on the journey of adopting Agile and Lean Software Development practices in 2010.

    The Pain

    The wM business line consists of about 40 Scrum teams delivering more than 30 enterprise products that constitute the webMethods suite across 7 locations in the world. Circa 2007, the suite was a loose collection of multiple products individually developed by teams, many of which were brought together by M&As. It was a hard, painful challenge to integrate and test these products as a single suite and synchronizing major releases. The teams embraced Scrum as the development model - a useful first step but still far from guaranteeing predictability, high standards of quality and productivity at the suite level.

    The Challenge

    • Align multiple, small scrum teams distributed over many locations to one Suite Backlog. Focus them on delivering an integrated Suite by modeling an assembly line from a Lean Manufacturing system. The teams develop and contribute to a single value stream with continuous flow and deliver potentially shippable Suite Build Sets in predictable intervals (4-6weeks).

    • Retain the simplicity of the ‘Agile model’. Allow teams to grow at their pace. The teams work off their individual team backlogs, the suite complexities and priority conflicts largely hidden from them. They experiment with their processes, drive their own local changes and share the learning with the other teams.

     Success:

    Since embracing Lean and Agile practices, we have delivered three successful major Suite releases on time with measured quality. The customer situation has dramatically improved with steadily decreasing customer incidents, response times and hot escalations. More than a 100,000 automated regression tests  verify the suite and we have a potentially shippable Suite build set every 4-6 weeks guaranteeing the highest standards of quality. For faster value delivery, we are now transitioning to 6-monthly releases – the first of which is due to roll out in Q4 2013.

    In this Experience report, I focus on how we aligned scrum teams operating from Germany, U.S, Bulgaria and India to a single backlog, a continuously integrated Suite and a potentially shippable single build set delivered every 4-6 weeks. We will look at the challenges we faced, custom solutions and processes that we designed to realize the Single Suite Vision.

02:30
  • place 8forum Andrea Heck

    Distributed Product Owner Team for an Agile Medical Development

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Advanced
     

    We are developing medical imaging and workflow software in an agile way with development teams distributed to several countries. One of the major challenges is how to set up and communicate within the Product Owner team. There we have to deal with the distribution, e.g., have the Product Owner either onsite with her peers or with her Scrum team, travelling, or with proxy. We need people who are good in two different fields of knowledge: medical and software development. As a third issues, the environment of the customers may be different in different countries.

    We have ramped up local Product Owners in different countries, have found local collaboration customers, and have developed a set of communication channels and workshops how to synchronize Product Owners in the team, share a common vision and backlog with their Scrum teams, and collaborate with customers locally and globally.

  • place 11forum Raja Bavani

    A Principle-Centered Approach to Distributed Agile (OR) Distributed Agile: Ten Guiding Principles

    schedule 02:30 PM - 02:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    The challenges in distributed agile can be seen under three broad categories viz., a) Communication and Coordination, b) Time Zone Differences and c) Issues related to People, Culture and Leadership Style. Successful teams consciously adhere to certain principles and it is their principle-centered approach that helps them face such challenges and deliver the best.

    Steven Covey wrote: "Principles always have natural consequences attached to them. There are positive consequences when we live in harmony with the principles. There are negative consequences when we ignore them. But because these principles apply to everyone, whether or not they are aware, this limitation is universal. And the more we know of correct principles, the greater is our personal freedom to act wisely." This is true in all situations of life and it includes application of agile methods in geographically distributed teams too.

    This session is to present the ten principles and elaborate 3-4 principles learned through experience in working with project teams and interactions with industry experts, and applied for more than a decade. These ten principles are above and beyond agile manifesto and agile principles. These are related to areas such as context-specific methodology, tools for productivity improvement, infrastructure for communication and coordination, knowledge management, focus on quality, inclusion, collaborative governance, automation, technical debt management, iteration progression and ensuring early success.

  • place 9forum Carlos Lopes

    Multiple projects, different goals, one thing in common: the codebase!

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Are you developing new functionalities into branches? Have you ever experienced the pain of merging the changes into trunk? The so called "merge hell" is one of the first and probably the most important smell that tells you've been abusing of your source control manager branching capabilities and, most likely, hurting your productivity and your code quality as well. In order to move towards a continuous delivery approach, the practice of trunk based development suggests ways to avoid this type of issues among others like inconsistent feature sets, code that stays in an undeployable state for a long time, regressions introduced by semantic differences that arise during those joyful merging sessions, integration surprises with the other features, and the like. Even if you are not a developer on your team you will benefit from the examples and techniques presented.

02:55
  • place 7forum Gopinath R

    3Cs for Agile Project Success - Critical Success Factors & Proven Practices

    schedule 02:55 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    Agile methodologies are gaining wider acceptance in Software Development and Testing due to its inherent values like Accelerate Time to Market, Eliminate Waste and flexible to adapt changes quickly. Agile practices emphasis on effective communication, collaboration and customer involvement for addressing the challenges in developing the product in dynamic business environment due to fast changing requirements. The co-location of project teams and high customer interaction throughout the project helps in achieving effective communication, team and customer collaboration.

     In an outsourced or offshore Software development, teams are geographically distributed to develop products in a collaborative and cost-effective manner by better utilization of global talents. Adopting agile methodologies helps in better ROI by developing quality products as per changing market needs in short span. Adopting Agile in global software development shall pose few challenges due to wider geographical distance, time zone differences, and cultural aspects and so on.

     

    This paper presents 3Cs – Communication, Collaboration and Customer Involvement as Critical Success Factors that need to be considered while implementing Agile for Global Software Development. It also details proven practices to address the challenges due to distributed agile software development. This paper is based on Author’s experience in executing Outsourced Product Development engagements using Distributed Agile Methodologies for co-creating Telecom products

03:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

03:30
  • place 0forum Corey Haines

    Rules of Simple Design

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Tutorial
     
    Beginner
     

    Everyone has acronyms, mnemonics, and a list of rules to guide their everyday software design. In order to get the most out of these age-old gems, one needs to deliberately practices them. Rules are a good way to remind ourselves of these gems.

    Corey Haines emphasies his design guidelines in form of the "4 Rules of Simple Design." Attend this talk to understand the four rules and their importance in everyday programming.

  • place 3forum Joseph V

    Tale of an Off-shore Agile Scrum Implementation

    schedule 03:30 PM - 03:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Couple of years ago our business unit engaged a vendor in India  to do some software development for us.  Since we are agile scrum based organization, we are seeking a vendor who has exposure to agile. We identified and signed up with a vendor to start the process. It was a ride filled lot of excitement and challenges. Finally we are able to land safely.

  • place 13forum Tarang Baxi

    A Practical Guide to Setting up Distributed Agile Projects

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    A practical guide to setting up a new agile project team. Based on years of agile delivery and coaching experience for projects in a number of distributed and offshore models, for teams sized from 10 to 200 people, and spread across 4 continents, and 8+ locations. Some areas that will be touched on:

    • People - how to organize distributed teams, cultural factors to consider, ways to build trust, and how to avoid timezone burnout.
    • Process - how to communicate effectively, plan collaboratively, setup distributed practices (standups, retros, pairing, etc), effectively divide work on a common codebase, maintain visibility, and track progress.
    • Tools - (tips provided as a handout) which hardware and software tools should you absolutely invest in to help overcome communication,  visibility and collaboration challenges
03:55
  • place 13forum Ebin John

    Transformation Vs Adoption

    schedule 03:55 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    This is a talk about how to identify and differentiate between Transformation and Adoption. Many change agents and companies are using this term interchangeably. This talk is a sincere effort to bring out the subtle difference between the two.

    We will also discuss about some advantages and disadvantageous of Adoption and Transformation. We will also look at some criteria to select a suitable model that can work for you. The discussion will be mainly based on Schneider model and impact of organization culture on change management.

    I would like to share the way we have changed our transformation pattern after learning about the impact of the culture. Will discuss about the best practices as well as challenges we face now.

04:30
  • place 11forum Mikael Gislen

    Mitigating clashing paradigms between Agile Development and ISO 9000

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Advanced
     

    There are, on a philosophical level, significant clashes between the agile paradigm and Quality Systems such as ISO 9000 or CMM/CMMi, this is already presented in the Agile Manifesto. Agile Development is based on what I would call post-modern paradigms when compared to the plan-driven and early iterative development methodologies which are based on a positivist paradigm.

    The underlying philosophical challenges cannot be easily mitigated. But a purist agile paradigm may tend to stress a positivist paradigm as well and this can be dangerous since then agile would not be agile any longer.

    While it may not be possible to completely remove the challenges between agile and quality systems, it is possible to learn to live with some tension between different paradigms. 

    There are some obvious areas of conflict, for examplethe Agile methodologies strongly discourages unnecessary documentation, and questions that it is possible to provide all requirements up-front. ISO 9000 on the other hand demands requirements up-front and documented evidence of almost anything, but such practical aspects can actually be mitigated with relative ease. Other aspects may demand much more effort. In particular the internal auditing process is problematic and other means of ensuring compliance may have to be considered.

    We have in my company systematically piloted a number of organisational changes in order to better support agile development. We have done this within the overall framework of our ISO 9000 system which is used a structure anda a gatekeeper. To do this we have used Action Research, which in it self is a kind of agile methodology, although of much older date than agile development.

    I will in my talk focus on the practical experiences we have had of building an organisational framework for agile development and while doing that suggesting a few means to mitigate the challenges mentioned initialy.

  • place 13forum Balaji Ganesh N

    Using Lean in Application Development to achieve competitive advantage and customer delight

    schedule 04:30 PM - 04:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    Executing add-on Application Development (AD) projects end to end is quite challenging. More so, if the same is executed under risk-reward model. According to an IBM study, only 40% of projects meet schedule, budget and quality goals. 20 to 25 percent don’t provide ROI and up to 50 percent require material rework. 

    With competitive pricing and cut throat competition eroding margins and denting market share, cost of delivery reduction with best in class quality has become an imperative for any service company in the IT outsourcing space.

    This case study shares the experience of an AD project (team size 40) in the Insurance domain completed over a period of 9 months (including warranty phase), with a geographic spread across 4 different locations. The team had end to end responsibility right from requirements gathering to System Integration Testing. The add-on functionality developed was rolled out to 5 states spanning 2 different releases. The team leveraged LEAN Six Sigma techniques (DSM, OA, Visual Controls, Mistake Proofing) for culture building, effective change management, early feedback, rework reduction through effective in-process defect reduction and doing things right the first time, resulting in increased customer goodwill, reward payments, enhanced business and high employee satisfaction. The project was flawlessly executed under the risk reward model with best in class quality, maintainability and scalability within the specified schedule.

  • place 4forum Evan Leybourn

    Let's Kill an Agile Project

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    Other talks and games will teach you how to run a successful Agile project. Only this one will teach you how to ruin an Agile project*. In this game we will break every Agile rule, disregard the manifesto and ignore common sense in the singular pursuit of failure (and fun).

    Each of you will be part of an Agile team with a dis-engaged Customer and micro-managing boss. Being Agile, there will be daily stand-ups, planning sessions, retrospectives, and kanban boards but nothing will go as you expect.

    * More importantly, this activity will teach you "how" Agile projects can fail and the reason behind many common Agile practices.

04:55
  • place 3forum Balaji.M

    Visualization and Agile Practices to the Rescue of Traditional Project

    schedule 04:55 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Intermediate
     

    We are from Large Indian IT Services organisation where most of the projects follow traditional/waterfall ways of working and the mindset of the senior management is also used to this way of working for all project types (Application Maintenance, Minor Enhancement, Bug Fixing and L3 Analysis space), while these methods have their own shortfalls and projects suffer because of the methodology, many leaders still believe that by following tradtional process their problems would be solved. Through this experience report, we would like to share how Visualisation and Agile Practices rescued the waterfall project from depleting Customer Confidence and Quality of Service Delivery.

    The Project team of 9 members distributed at onsite and offshore was involved in maintenance / enhancement type of work for a large Investment Bank with several new features being implemented as change requests. Team’s responsibility starts from Analysis to Deployment into Production for the work comes in ad-hoc manner. The issues and challenges by project teams were

    • Longer duration to complete the change requests and ensuring an on-time delivery
    • Low Customer Satisfaction and Quality of Deliverable.
    • Proactively manage application issues despite higher experience of team.
    • Low employee morale
    • Lack of senior management participation and constant fire fighting with the customer.

    Project team focused on 3 areas

    Business/Client IT team

    • Prioritize the change requests by highest business/end user value (Input Cadence)

    • ‘Drive’ the development efforts to incrementally deliver

    Teams

    • Focused on speed in delivering change request by eliminating waste

    • Focused on enhancing knowledge sharing by Collaboration using Visualisation Boards and daily stand up meeting

    • Focus to Deliver right at First Time

    Management

    • Focus on the value stream (cycle time)

    • ‘Drive’ Continuous Improvement (Kaizen)

    • Manage impediments , making blockers visible

    Within 3 months of time after team started adopting the Visualisation and Agile practices the teams and senior management could see the improvement in the areas of 

    1. Increase in Balance Score Card scores from 4 to 6.5 and many areas scored 7.0/7.0
    2. Productivity improvement by 25%

05:30
  • place 0forum Chad Wathington

    The Broken State of Process Improvement in Software Development

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Experimentation and the scientific method are very valuable for validating business opportunities. The Lean Startup and Lean UX are driving new thought patterns in the software development world. However, despite all the new thinking on product, rarely do organizations apply these techniques to their processes, opting for inefficiently adding more steps ad nauseum until productivity has ground to a halt. We’ll cover the following topics:

    • What are processes, and why do we need them
    • How processes affect delivery and productivity
    • Scale and process inefficiency
    • Process experimentation techniques
    • Designing productive processes
  • place 4forum Ram Ramalingam

    The secret shortcuts to Agile... (that won't get you there)

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Advanced
     

    This is an exploratory talk, based, first, on some recent insights from cognitive science, behavioural economics (which have enriched Agile folklore already) and then on, some interesting twists from culture based research in sociology and psychology. While the former will be useful in understanding the common pitfalls encountered in a scaled Agile implementation, the latter, maybe useful in understanding the unexpected twists when doing scaled agile in a distributed/off-shore environment that have different cultural norms.

    While the anti-patterns and anti-paths are common across the world, the solution to these does differ. The assumptions behind what leads to a motivated, self-organizing, self-directing team will determine how to bring about a nuanced mindset to Agility, and understanding that what works in the West may not work in India (and other similar higher Power-Distance-Index countries).

    While sharing my experiences in a large scale Agile transformation and working with different cultures, I hope to bring out some subtle variations that could be useful in coaching and working with and transforming Agile teams in an offshore engagement.

  • place 7forum Johannes Brodwall

    Remote Pair Programming

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Beginner
     

    Can you maintain agile engineering practices with a distributed team?

    Johannes is the Oslo based Chief Scientist for the Sri Lanka based company Exilesoft. In order to promote agile engineering practices, he uses remote pair programming to connect with teams halfway across the world.

    In this talk, we will go through a practical approach for remote pair programming adopted for high-latency situations. We will demonstrate remote pair programming with a live example and we will discuss the advantages and usages of the approach. We will also cover the practical parts of remote pair programming, such as tools and setup.

    After seeing this talk, the audience should be able to remotely pair with members of their distributed team. They will also get a lot of tips on how to use pair programming effectively in both local and remote settings.

06:30
07:30
08:00

    Dinner, Agile Art and Networking - 180 mins

Agile Lifecycle

08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
  • place 0forum Ash Maurya

    How To Build Features People Will Want

    schedule 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Intermediate
     

    Most products fail. Not because we fail to build what we set out to build, but because we waste time, money, and effort building the wrong product.

    In this talk, I'll share our lean product development process that utilizes continuous customer feedback loops to ensure you don't go astray and instead build products people (will) want.

    What you'll learn:

    - How to track your your feature lifecycle on a validated learning kanban board
    - How to use qualitative testing techniques for early validation during the design and test phases
    - And then follow up with cohort based quantitative metrics to verify you have built something people wanted.

10:00
10:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

10:30
  • place 2forum Pramod Sadalage

    Ten Patterns of Database Refactoring

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Over the life of an application as requirements change, application usage patterns alter, load and performance changes the need to change database and database architecture is inevitable. There are patterns of these changes such as

    1. 1. Encapsulate Table with View
    2. 2. Migrate method from database
    3. 3. Replace method with views
    4. 4. Introduce Read only table
    5. 5. Split table
    6. 6. Make column non-nullable
    7. 7. Drop column
    8. 8. Add foreign key constaint
    9. 9. Merge columns
    10. 10. Replace columns

    In this talk we will discuss the above database refactoring patterns and different implementation techniques to enable blue, green deployments, allow for legacy applications to work with fast changing database and enable the teams to effectively refactor the database to fulfill the changing needs of the organization.

  • place 7forum Michael Heydt

    Applying Lean UX to Capital Markets - Lessons From a Year of Lean UX on Wall Street

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    The Lean UX approach to interaction design is a spectacular model for defining and implemented what is needed in appications to support the users in their jobs, as compared to technical deliverables that in the end often do not meet the needs of the users.  In this talk, I will go over strategies for applying lean UX practices to capital markets projects, adapting UX to agile processes, including executing user interviews, rapid UX design, mockups to UI prototypes, and rapid implementation through continuous delivery and end user experience / acceptance testing.

  • place 5forum Daniel Zen

    Agile Engineering Javascript with Jasmine & AngularJS, Karma & Jenkins

    schedule 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Tutorial
     
    Intermediate
     

    Agile & Test Driven Development of frontend JavaScript User Interface code is often passed over using the excuse that the UI code is "declarative" (What you see is what you get) and therefore does not 'need' to be tested. Others, will dismiss testing frontend AJAX code as too difficult to maintain or unnecessary because it is only important in context with the server. We will show how these misconceptions are false. 

    We will cover several popular JavaScript tools and technologies that make Agile frontend web development easy. We will show how these front end technologies cannot only be functionally tested, but Unit Tested. If time is available will cover Continuous Integration, Dependency Injection, & Mock objects.  

    By including your front-end code in your automated testing process you can prevent the inclusion of bugs that are usually only caught with manual testing.

11:30
  • place 1forum Arlo Belshee

    Agility: Step 1: Discipline; Step 2: Make Awesome

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    What comes after Agile? That depends on what you did for Agile. We will start by talking about the practices - and results - that only the top 2% of agile teams do. For most teams, this is what is beyond their Agile. Then we'll talk about patterns in the things that these top 2% are trying. Everything comes from the insane disciple Agile teams possess; let's look at how they capitalize on it.

  • place 5forum Richard Kasperowski

    Self-management and Self-organization: Agile Games with Motion

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    Self-management and self-organization are important themes in Agile software development, but what do they actually look like?  We pontificate about worker empowerment, but then we revert to command-and-control: our product owners mandate project scope and deadlines, and our Scrum Masters assign tasks to team members.  Why can’t we let teams be self-organized and workers be self-managed?
     
    These activity-based learning activities are kinesthetic learning games.  Players learn by playing fun, physical games of movement.  These games create a social atmosphere and a full body and mind experience that make it easy and fun to learn.  We’ll play five games, including Line Up, 60 Paces, Triangles, Human Knot, and a special surprise game.
     
    In this session, we explore and experience self-management and self-organization via Agile games.  You will leave with a deep internalized understanding of self-management and self-organization and an appreciation of how they work better than command-and-control.  You’ll be able to share these games with your coworkers.

12:00
12:15
12:30

    Lunch - 60 mins

01:30
  • place 6forum Shashank Teotia

    Polyglot Programming and Agile Development

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Advanced
     

    Polyglot Programming as a technique is not new and as a paradigm was coined in 2006 by Neal Ford. In today's world, we often architect solutions which need to be highly scalable, secure, efficient, have an engaging GUI, be extensible with low technical debt in parts or whole. To work with a single tech stack promotes a sense of mono culture which is detrimental and limiting the way a solution can be designed. Moreover, with multi-core machines available, processing now can leverage parallel processing and it maybe make more sense to use a language which takes away the overhead of the intricacies of multi-thread programming.

    In other words, in many cases, engaging in Polyglot Programming helps you focus more on the domain and adds to developer productivity.

    On the flip side, increasing the moving parts also means that if not designed well, Polyglot Programming could be a double edged sword and produce more mess in the way different pieces interact with each other.

    In this talk, we will showcase an ecosystem we built, involving a desktop device configuration backed, an OS-agnostic desktop GUI, a cloud service, a cloud cluster configuration tool and how we used the Agile principles, namely TDD, Continuous Integration and the works to be able to keep the polyglot ecosystem sane.

    Name wise, the languages/tools/etc which we used in our Polyglot case – Google Go, Node-Webkit, JS (Knockout/RequireJS), Ruby, Cucumber, RIAK, Chef, Lisp, Jenkins

     

  • place 7forum Tathagat Varma

    Designing agile feedbacks for agile learning - an experience report

    schedule 01:30 PM - 01:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    Feedback is perhaps the most important aspect of the overall agile lifecycle. If the feedback is too wide and shallow, it won't give enough actionable feedback. If it is too narrow and deep, it might fail to register feedback outside its focus area. So, how does one go about designing feedbacks that enable agile learning. We call them agile feedbacks.

    In this brief session, we will share an experience from designing agile feedbacks for agile trainings and workshops. The objective was to get most critical feedback in shortest amount of time to enable quick action planning. We created feedback that took a maximum of 5 minutes and enabled the most important learning in both, focussed as well as open-ended manner that allowed us to focus on the most critical items. We employed elements of Design Thinking and Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation (RITE) to improve the process and quality of feedback themselves. We will also be touching up these concepts and how effective they were.

  • place 5forum Ellen Grove

    Build Your Dreams: User Requirements Gathering with LEGO Serious Play

    schedule 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    Let your hands be the search engine for your brain! LEGO® Serious Play® is a powerful thinking, communicating and problem solving technique that can help you and your team do serious work through structured play activities using a popular and playful 3D modeling toy. Through a facilitated process of building models that, storytelling and reflection, every person at the table is engaged and actively participating in the discussion, whether the topic is individual aspirations, team relationships, developing a new product or solving a wicked organizational problem. Everyone builds and everyone tells their story – all participants have equal opportunity to put their own points of view on the table, unlocking new perspectives and exposing the answers that are already in the room.  LEGO Serious Play has been used successfully for team-building and problem solving in a variety of organizations, from NASA to RBC to academic settings and public utilities.  

    This presentation provides a hands-on introduction to LEGO Serious Play, so that you can experience firsthand how using LEGO to do real work unleashes creativity and enables meaningful conversations in a very short time. We will explore how to use this playful technique to collaboratively elicit information about user requirements and strategic design issues using the open source User Requirements with Lego methodology developed by a team at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.  This approach is particularly suited to Agile teams that want to get team members and stakeholders sharing their different perspectives on common goals in an open and light-weight manner.

01:55
  • place 32forum Sreerupa Sen

    Changing our Rhythm: Our Ongoing Journey towards Continuous Delivery

    schedule 01:55 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    Annual software release cycles cramping the agility of the team? Too many hot fixes reducing the efficiency of your organization? Customers waiting impatientlyfor  the next cool features hot off the press? These are some of the painful and common problems faced by development teams worldwide. In today's world, most things get outdated or out-of-fashion very fast - and software is no different. Users cannot afford to wait for the next cool set of features for a year. They want a steady stream of cool new features that they can adopt and use immediately.

    My team follows a development model that we like to call Open Commercial Development - where we're always connected to our stakeholders, our plans are out in the open, and we're always gathering feedback and reprioritizing. We used to have yearly releases of our product - a sort of big bang release with a host of new featres. Based on our stakeholder interactions, however, we figured that our software delivery wasn't agile enough for our customers. Users wanted new features incrementally throughout the year. They especially didn't want to wait a year for a feature that they'd requested that was critical for their business.

    So began our journey to Continuous Delivery - an interesting one for sure. It's not easy to deliver new features, manage technical debt, collaborate with users and incorporate their feedback into the new features - once every quarter. To do it consistently, with quality and on time, you need to have a framework in place - a combination of planning, process, automation and team organization - that lets teams focus on the right things to get to DONE DONE for their new features, and at the same time manage their quality and tecnical debt. Over the past year, we like to think that we've put that framework in place, and that is what I'd like to talk about in this session.

02:30
  • place 0forum Jez Humble

    Why The Project Paradigm Kills Innovation, and What To Do Instead

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Projects were invented as a vehicle for managing civil engineering projects. But software has completely different characteristics from, say, a bridge. In this talk I'll explain why the use of projects causes significant dysfunction, and how to build innovative products and services at scale based on lean principles.

  • place 6forum Mukesh Bhangria

    Continuous Refactoring at Amazon: A Case Study

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Between the project deadlines, we always feel there is code which needs to be improved

    Usually Developers have the following 3 options:

    - Bite the bullet and do the refactoring as they go along.
    - Park the issue and address it later.
    - Allocate special time when the project gets out-of-control.

    As customer facing stories take higher priority, usually Developers are forced to choose the last option.

    However a team at Amazon took a different approach. Attend this session to listen to their first-hand story of how they changed this typical behavior to achieve Continuous Deployment on a critical service.

03:00
03:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

03:30
  • place 6forum Cara Turner

    Building Creative Teams: Motivation, Engagement and Retrospectives

    schedule 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    90 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Advanced
     

    How do software teams become creative? If you're not a start-up, does creativity even play a role in the business driven world of software development? Idea generation is the basis of all our work - no matter how challenging or mundane. With a scientific approach to implementing change, creativity is the basic tool we have for addressing the challenges of software development.

    This talk explores the elements of engagement and creativity along with the neuroscience of generating ideas. These give us specific insight into how employing different agile retrospective formats over the course of the product development process can extend our usual practices and develop a thinking mind-set comfortable with tackling daily work with a fresh and explorative approach.

  • place 9forum Mushtaq Ahmed

    Using a modern web framework for big enterprise agile project

    schedule 03:30 PM - 03:50 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Advanced
     

    At ThoughtWorks, a 50-people team is building a marketing website backend for one of the largest consumer electronics brands in the world. We are Play-Scala as our web framework which allows us to design the application in a very different but powerful ways. This experience based talk will talk about these differences, emphasizing on two of them: "Dealing with concurrency without threads" and "Dependency resolution with constructor injection".

    Dealing with concurrency without threads
    - The backend is end to end non-blocking with highly concurrent architecture
    - Each page consists of 20+ reusable snippets, so each page request translates into 20+ outbound web service calls to get data for the snippet data in parallel
    - Posting data involves download/upload of large images from/to remote services, also done in parallel
    - We will show you how Scala Futures, Play and ReactiveMongo functional programming paradigm allows us to do all this without blocking any thread or managing thread-pools by hand

    Dependency resolution with constructor injection
    - Dependency injection is considered essential for designing applications that are easy to test. Usaully, dependencies are specified as constructors parameters
    - Scala traits allow us to get rid of constructors by wrapping classes and their factories inside components that in turn can depend on other components, this enables a compile time mechanism for dependency resolution which is very flexible
    - We will show examples of this pattern, its effects testing without external DI frameworks

    We will briefly talk on how functional programming style in general helps with testing and software delivery on agile projects. Finally, we will also cover the pain-points these approaches bring out, and argue if it is worth to pay that cost.

     

     

  • place 16forum Johannes Brodwall

    Practice agile programming with coding dojo

    schedule 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    A Coding Dojo is a fun and social way to become a better programmer. Johannes is an experienced coding coach who will guide you through a few hours of programming that will transform your understand your craft and yourself as a programmer. In the workshop you get to try out pair programming, test-driven development and continuous refactoring for yourself and you get lots of recommendations on how to improve your coding and testing. You will need to bring your own computer with a development environment of your choice. Recommended for Java, Ruby, JavaScript and C# developers.

    This is what previous participants say about the workshop:

    • What did you learn? New tools, pair programming and fun exercises; Ide tricks, programming language basics, testing tools, using tests as a reasoning tool; you can comfortably pair with strangers.
    • What surprised you? Small steps work better than planning; It's easy to get started when you pair program; Pair programming is nice
    • What do you plan to do next? Using TDD every day; Listen to partner more carefully - he may already have solved the problem.
04:00
  • place 20forum Vinod Purushothaman

    Hurdles: The sprint with impediments on the way to Automation

    schedule 04:00 PM - 04:20 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    Since the inception of Agile, practices has improvised and changed drastically. Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery are few among them. I have practiced these methods and it really helped the team to deliver quality working software.

    Most of the team are working hard and trying to deliver on time. Automation leverages the team to make this happen through Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery. We all know changes are really hard, and we have to surpass several challenges to succeed.

    We all are familiar with Sprints, here I am going to share the Hurdles I pass through to implement build and deployment automation. 

04:30
  • place 9forum Karthik Kamal Balasubramaniam

    I am OK, You are OK

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Beginner
     

    There is a level of "assumptions" that each one of us work with, while we deal with any system. Here in this case the system could be a team member, the manager, the management, or the entire organization. While we work with assumptions, the conversations or the discussions or the work we do, can seem like getting nowhere because of the conflicts, and a sense of frustration piles on .This is a common situation and a very common feeling amongst Coaches/Scrum masters/Project Managers or anyone dealing with project management scenarios. That is where "contracting" helps us get our way through!

    Contracting is a concept of "Transactional Analysis" school of psychology. Eric Berne defines it as "an explicit bilateral commitment to a well-defined course of action". Sometimes contracts will be multi-handed - all parties to the contract will have their own expectations. In the unusual event that these are all congruent, then fine. However, if not, then discussing everyone's expectations will lead to greater understanding and therefore to a clear contract. The risk in not doing this is that problems in completing the contract will emerge at some stage.

    3 Categories of contracts are administrative, professional and psychological.

    Administrative contracts deals with the operational agreements- like fees, who has to do what, time, frequency, attendees etc.

    Professional contracts deals with the expectations from each role and clarifies the essential setup required to achieve the same

    Psychological contracts talks about how we work as people and help to understand how we express our comforts/ discomforts       

    Amongst the three contracts psychological contracts are very essential and often ignored in projects. This type of contract will help us co-create any assignment and it’s a powerful tool for Agile coaches while they work with their teams, managers, organization etc.

    Further to agree with any contract, both the parties should operate from a space where there is mutual trust and concern (I am Ok , You are Ok).

    This report will discuss in detail about these contracts with examples from Agile projects, in an activity based sessions. We will also discuss the life positions based on 'I am OK, You are OK' theory.

    Note: Please note that this presentation is not about the business/financial contracts that most of us are aware of. However, the framework of contracts could be applied in any situation including the business/financial contracts.

05:00
05:30
  • place 0forum Todd Little

    Mythbusting Software Estimation

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Estimating software projects has proven to be particularly challenging. Over-running schedules happens frequently in our industry. Todd will look into some of the reasons for these challenges by exploring a number of myths of software estimation and then setting out to validate or bust these myths.

  • place 0forum Nitin Ramrakhyani

    Lean Roots to Grow, Wings to fly!

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    A lot has been said about Kanban and how these can be implemented in Software development, but the learning remains superficial till we go deep down to its roots to understand the core underlying practices and principles and why/how these practices evolved over a period of time. Infact the roots of most of the Agile methods can be traced back to Lean/Toyota Production Systems, a set of practices and techniques used by Toyota to build great set of cars with limited amount of resources. Even though building software is much different than building a car, there are many lessons and practices that can be learnt and applied nonetheless.

    In this interactive and visual talk, we'll take a virtual trip to Japan and learn some of the best practices/concepts that originated at Toyota for building "world-class" cars and see how each of these can be applied to software development. Learning about the roots of Lean should help the attendees in sowing the seeds of Lean improvement in their organizations and would help in building better software and improving the efficiency of the software delivery lifecycle.

  • place 11forum Howard Deiner

    Pivoting Your Organization to Become Agile Testers

    schedule 05:30 PM - 06:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    Many organizations struggle with transforming from the old style teams consisting of members with specialized silos of skills into Agile teams consisting of generalized specialists.  This results in sub-optimal Agile adoptions in Agile/Scrum environments, which is where most organizations transforming to Agile are advised to start.

    We will start with a look into the real role of QA in the organization, and where they truly add value in the production of quality code to allow the business to move forward. Piggybacking on the role of QA, we will then speak to exactly what QA needs to do to add value to the software development process, and how they integrate in the DevOps model that is a contemporary solution to an age old issue.  And, finally, we will speak to some uncomfortable truths, and draw conclusions into the skills that Agile Testers must be expected to master to allow the organization to pivot successfully into a truly Agile development group.

06:30
  • place 1forum Ryan Martens

    Beyond Agile Execution: Agility for Business and Impact

    schedule 06:30 PM - 07:30 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Beginner
     

    Agile is not just a process change, its a mindset change for most. With faster time to market, better feedback and highly functioning teams, the Agile mindset opens our eyes to a better way of working as humans on large complicated and complex problems. Combining it with the concepts of Lean Startup, delivers another leap in team capacity and capabilities. It also opens the possibilities of using agility for more than just software development.

    Do you wonder how can we drive innovation in a disciplined way to tame our world's toughest problems? Can we apply the lessons learned from Agile and Lean Startup? Over the past three years, we've been able to apply agility at a new level, beyond business impact. Through our corporate social responsibility effort, "Rally for Impact", we aim to apply the agile mindset to mobilize citizen engineers to serve our communities and protect the planet. I want you to consider this growth path for yourself and your agile teams.

    Let's open the worlds mindset to a better way to empathize, explore and execute in these complex times.

07:30
08:00

    Dinner, Agile Art and Networking - 180 mins

Beyond Agile

08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
  • place 0forum Dave Thomas

    Unknown Knowns

    schedule 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    60 mins
     
    Keynote
     
    Advanced
     

    In 2002, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld introduced us to the concepts of known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns. But he left out Unknown Knowns, things that we know without knowing it. And it turns out that these Unknown Knowns are actually the biggest category of knowledge - tacit knowledge.


    As developers, we work with knowledge: knowledge of the problem domain, knowledge of our tools, knowledge of our techniques, and knowledge of each other. So getting good at accumulating tacit knowledge is important.

    This talk will look at how we are poorly served by most of the current ways we are taught to be better developers. Can we do better? Only if we stop talking and start showing. Let's see why.

10:00
10:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

10:30
  • place 0forum Jez Humble

    Secrets of Growing an Innovation Culture

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    The fundamental problem with software methodologies is that none of them work. What's decisive is not which one you adopt, but what you do to continue to innovate around your processes. In this wide-ranging talk, I'll discuss why command-and-control leads to risk management theatre, and why this makes things riskier and more painful. I'll present the essence of innovation culture, how it works at scale, and present some tools (including the Improvement Kata) to help you think differently about how to grow great software.

  • place 9forum Victoria Schiffer

    Agile Coaching? Sure thing! What about Life Coaching in Agile Thinking?

    schedule 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    I love being around awesome people, who build great products customers desire. 
    I love learning from and together with these amazing minds. 
    I love creating the right environment for teams to flourish. 
    I love change, and learning from new experiences. 
    I love working in Agile environments.

    How about you? 
    I bet there are some elements of this list why you're in Agile, too. And you can probably add even more elements to it.

    The Agile Manifesto states amongst others individuals and interactions, customer collaboration and responding to change.

    In our everyday life doing Agile we already respect these aspects in many ways. 
    But do we practice what we preach as best we can?

    I'd like to challenge your current way of thinking about people and processes. 
    I'd like to challenge you to focus on you, before you focus on others. 
    I'd like to challenge your current way of reflecting. 
    I'd like to inspire you to go different ways. 
    I'd like to inspire you to inspire others.

    In Agile we're already good in improving our processes and creating well performing teams and hence building the right things in the right way. And in the Agile Manifesto's communication and collaboration piece we can even get better.
    "You have not yet reached the limit of what you're capable of!" means we can always further improve. And we do follow this idea in our Agile processes, too, through continuous feedback (Retrospectives) and improvement.

    And why not take it even further? Why not go "Beyond Agile"?!

    Here's where aspects of Life Coaching come in handy: through also understanding and improving ourselves (how do we interact with people due to how we perceive our environment) we will even further improve communication and collaboration.

    Life Coaches believe our clients know the answer. And even if Agile Coaching is slightly different than Life Coaching, I see it as very relevant in Agile Coaching, too. If we apply this in Agile, instead of giving our clients (team, colleagues) the answers, asking them powerful questions to help them be more aware of what's happening at the moment, they will find their answer for it and will have a much better commitment to making the change for themselves, their teams and the company. It's not for us to TELL them what to do, but to ASK them what's going on for themselves. Here's where I see a huge chance for improvement.

    In my session I give lots of examples on how to link Life Coaching ideas to our Agile work environments. I've given the session at LAST Conference Melbourne and at the Agile Coaching Circles Meetup Melbourne. The audience was engaged and the attendees were very happy about having some new ideas on how to improve their daily work life.

    Come along to be inspired by Life Coaching and thus to benefit our Agile Thinking!

  • place 14forum Giovanni Asproni

    Methodology Patterns: a Different Approach to Create a Methodology for Your Project

    schedule 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Tutorial
     
    Advanced
     

    In the software world we have been looking for “The Methodology” to solve our software development sorrows for quite a while. We started with Waterfall, then Spiral, Evo, RUP and, more recently with XP, Scrum, Kanban, DAD, SAFe (there are many others, but, their impact, so far, has been limited).

    In this tutorial, I'll show why this search for the holy grail is bound to fail--each methodology has strenghts and weaknesses that make it suitable only in some contexts--and I'll describe a different approach based on patterns and pattern languages, that teams can use to create their own methodologies to suit their specific needs, which, in my experience, has a higher chance of success. 

    The approach is based on the observation that all the practices used in all modern methodologies--e.g., user stories, use cases, team self organization, TDD, unit testing, acceptance testing, continuous integration, iterative and incremental development, etc.--come from the same set. Different methodologies just mix and match them differently. All those practices can (and many have already been) described as patterns whose relationships with each other form a set of pattern languages.

11:30
  • place 0forum Tathagat Varma

    Agile, Management 3.0, Holacracy...what next?

    schedule 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Advanced
     

    Pesentation deck is now available at http://www.slideshare.net/Managewell/what-next-31791295

    Modern management methods are still based on the then seminal work by Henri Fayol some 200 years back, followed by Frederick Taylor's work some 100 years back! Sadly, those models were predominantly based on industrial work, and don't really work that well in knowledge industry and today's sociological dynamics at workplace. Classical Agile methods codify several people practices that allow for a self-organizing team to evolve, but doesn't offer a lot of guidance on how to develop and groom leadership for agile organizations beyond a software team. Management 3.0 takes this issue further and develops it into a separate discipline altogether. On similar lines, Holacracy seeks to create social technology for purposeful organizations, though not specially targeting software organizations. So, the issue of leadership still continues to be unresolved and rather left to pave its way on its own. Unfortunately, when we want to achieve true end-to-end agility, it is not enough for software teams to be charging at top speeds but leadership not evenly matched to support them well in their endeavors. We clearly have a problem at hand...

    In this talk, we will study how the role of leadership has evolved and what does it look like for agile organizations at present. Many agile methods take an extreme view that limit leadership to team-level collective ownership of leadership. However, that might not be enough because of various reasons. In any non-trivial organization, whether a software organizations or any modern business employing software for business advantage, the reality is that organization units beyond a plain-vanilla software teams do exist. So, how does one go about grooming their top talent for playing an effective part in this process?

    Finally, we will also try to take a shot at some of evolving paradigms. For example, all these management thoughts are still based on the kind of outdated premise that an organization is based on 'boundaries' of operations. However, already we see that model being broken down, and the future teams look more like boundaryless entities bound with nothing but a unifying purpose that brings a bunch of volunteers together for a period of time. If our success increasing depends on such teams being able to effectively self-manage themselves, what role does leadership have to play in it, and are we getting ready for it? 

  • place 27forum Prasanna Vaste

    Should we stop using Story Points and Velocity?

    schedule 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    On Agile projects we estimate user stories in order to allow team to

    1. 1. Track velocity
    2. 2. Decide scope for the Iteration
    3. 3. Help Prioritize stories
    4. 4. Help Release planning

    But most of the time we faced issues with estimation. It takes lot of time in estimating user stories, managers tend to relate estimate to number of days it will take to complete the story, in some teams estimate is equal to deadline. Most of the teams which use story points to estimate the work face these issues. This results in lack of confidence on development team when stories are taking more time to complete.

    Here I am going to talk about better alternative for both the suppliers of software products (financially and ethically) and their customers (internal and external). This alternative is being used in real companies delivering to real customers with great effect where team uses count of stories completed in an Iteration as measure of progress. Will talk about how this alternative can be used to track velocity, prioritize stories, planning Iteration and for release planning.

    I will share some exmples from my past projects where team did not use story points/velocty but used count of stories completed in Iteration to measure progress and also as best indicator of future performance.

11:55
  • place 17forum Nikhil Joshi

    Build - Measure - Learn : Without spending a fortune

    schedule 11:55 AM - 12:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    20 mins
     
    Experience Report
     
    Beginner
     

    At times we have great product ideas but the biggest barrier to entry lies in answering few questions such as:

    - How do I define and validate Problem hypothesis, Solution hypothesis and Underlying assumptions?

    - How do I quickly setup a platform for people to register their interest?

    - What will keep the potential customers engaged, excited until the first release (or beta) is out?

    - How do I get feedback from the early adopters?

    - And eventually when I have answers to some of these questions, how do I make a decision to persevere or pivot?

    If you've faced a challenge while answering any of these questions while building/validating your product idea, this session is for you. We'll look at tools and techniques to validate the product hypothesis early-on without spending months or fortunes. We'll also look at a case study to highlight how some of these tools, techniques helped us validate our product idea.

12:30

    Lunch - 60 mins

01:30
  • place 14forum Vibhor Agarwal

    Microsoft Visual Studio's Journey to Continuous Delivery

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Intermediate
     

    Microsoft Visual Studio is now releasing at a much faster pace and the Team Foundation Service has  a deployment every sprint. We adopted agile practices across the board and made significant improvements to engineering processes and systems down the way. What are the impediments to agile and how you overcome them. How do you reimagine the role of developers and testers in this new era. What kind of tools do you need to make this transition a success for your team ?

    Come and learn what it takes to adopt modern processes to ship complex products like Visual Studio with engineering teams spread across the globe to ship at cloud cadence. 

  • place 0forum Lyssa Adkins

    Hiring (or Growing) the Right Agile Coach

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    There are as many types of agile coaches out there as there are flavors of ice cream.  And, their levels of leadership maturity and skill can vary just as widely.  It can leave one fretting, "What am I really getting when I bring in an agile coach?  And, how do I 'grow' my own?"  In fact, what are the "must have" skills of an agile coach and how can you tell if your coach has them?  The Agile Coach Competency Framework is one big clue to answering these questions. Over the past two years, this framework has guided the development of hundreds of agile coaches. Agile managers and champions also use it to obtain "truth in advertising" to hire the right coach at the right time.  We will explore this framework and provide lightening-talk-style case studies that showcase how it has been used in the real world.  You'll leave with ideas and actions to help you become a more savvy purveyor (and/or developer) of agile coaches.

  • place 7forum Elinor Slomba

    Scrum of One

    schedule 01:30 PM - 02:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Intermediate
     

    Artists tend to function in ways that are intuitively Agile.  Working closely alongside arts leaders for nearly twenty years before becoming a Scrum Master, I have devised a set of practices that solopreneurs, freelancers or anyone working without Agile support in a larger company can practice to become more productive and contribute positively to organizational culture.  I have been putting this into practice for managing deliverables with my own clients as a consultant.  Each practice has two parts.  For example, Scrum of One Timeboxing includes Step One: Give Yourself a Deadline.  Step Two: Blackmail Yourself by Putting it in Print.  Another is Scrum of One Product Ownership Step One: Figure out who your patron is. Step Two: Show them your works-in-progress and ask for feedback.  A particularly powerful practice is Scrum of One Standups Step One: set up regular times to meet on a given project.  Step Two: keep to the schedule, and if you're the only one who shows up, document and report on the hurdles you're facing.  Scrum of One can help many more people adopt the Agile mindset that is a precursor to smooth collaboration on teams.  

02:30
  • place 11forum Roy Nuriel

    The Quality Assurance Journey - From Waterfall to Continuous Delivery

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Case Study
     
    Intermediate
     

    In the past several years we have seen more and more organization taking the decision and moving their development divisions to adopt Agile methodology. In most cases the change starts with a POC of a new and – in most cases – small project that validates the ability of the organization to make the shift to Agile. In many cases the development team takes the lead: changing the process, moving to unified teams, selecting which Agile practice to adopt, etc.

    In this session I will share how we made the shift, while focusing on the change in our quality process.

    As an R&D group that develops an Agile solution (HP Agile Manager), we wanted to get it right. We changed the way in which we develop software from waterfall to Agile, and built a process to support the teams in a complex and large enterprise. While previously we were accustomed to delivering releases in 1-2 year cycles, we now operate within a SaaS model where we update our production environment on a weekly basis. 

    We have experimented with the same process that our customers are going through and, as a result, we adapted the way our QA engineers work. In accordance with their new role, we gave them a new title – Dev Testers.

    Here are some of the dilemmas we faced:

    -          What are the differences between "Dev Tester" and "QA Engineer"?

    -          How can we measure quality in 2-week sprints?

    -          What needs to change when testing a SaaS solution that is delivered on a weekly basis?

    -          When and how should load testing be performed?

    -          Automated v. manual testing

    -          What testing should be part of the CI process?

    -          How do offshore Dev Testers take part in our Agile practices (e.g. daily meetings)?

    We dealt with all of these questions, and I would like to share the lessons we learned, our conclusions, and some of the challenges that we still face.

  • place 8forum Naresh Jain

    Continuous Deployment for iOS Game Development

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Intermediate
     

    "Release Early, Release Often" is a proven mantra and many companies have taken this one step further by releasing products to real users with every commit a.k.a Continuous Deployment (CD).

    Over the years, I've built many web/infrastructure products, where we've effectively practiced CD. However at Edventure Labs, when we started building iPad games, we realized there was no easy was to practice CD, esp. given the fact that Apple review takes a few days.

    Our main question was: As mobile app developers, how should we architect/design our apps for CD?

    We were a young startup, learning new behavior about our users (kids aged 5-8) everyday. We could not afford any delay in releasing latest, greatest features to our users. To solve this problem, I believe we've built an innovative solution to enable any mobile app developer to achieve CD.

    If you are building real products, which have platform/3rd-party dependencies and you want to practice CD, this session is for you.

  • place 7forum Phil Abernathy

    The Sixth Force

    schedule 02:30 PM - 03:15 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Over the last 2 years, in small pockets all over the world, people have been experimenting with the use of Agile and Lean in formulating and executing corporate strategy.

    The finding will astound you and lay the foundations for what may become the next wave of ‘Agilean’ transformations, thus paving the way for vertically transformed ‘Agilean’ organisations that deliver outstanding profitability.

    The ‘Lean Startup’ mentality or ‘Management 3.0’ are tips of the iceberg in recent strategic thinking.

    This talk draws on experience and real life examples to outline how Agile and Lean, and not just Porter’s 5 forces, can be used effectively to not only formulate and execute corporate strategy but also to enable transformation throughout the organisation.

03:15

    Coffee/Tea Break - 15 mins

03:30
  • place 0forum Venkat Kandaswamy

    Applying Agile to a Bootstrapped Startup

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Beginner
     

    The default state of a Start up is Failure - Chris Dixon. On 18-Sep-2008, on the day Lehman Brothers collapsed, I started developing a prototype ( which later became ApartmentADDA.com ), with an unclear picture of the problem definition, not much access to the target Users and zero funding.

    Having experienced Agile as a Developer at ThoughtWorks, I tried applying some of the agile concepts. Found it a fabulous fit - true to its promise of light in the darkness of uncertainty and imprecise problem statements.

    In this talk I will take you through my Start up Journey - the first 5 years when we were Bootstrapped - how we were able to nail the Problem Definition and find the Product Market fit and how we overcame severe resource constraints - not only in Product Development, but in other functions like Sales, Marketing and Support.

    I will make a case on how applying Agile prudently to a Bootstrapped Start up can change the Default State of a Startup - which is Failure - to that of a Success.

  • place 9forum Anand Bagmar

    Automate across Platform, OS, Technologies with TaaS

    schedule 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Demonstration
     
    Advanced
     

    "TaaS" is an open-source product that allows you do achieve the "correct" way of doing integration testing across a variety of products via Test Automation.

    Typically in organizations, there are multiple projects / products. Many organizations like to have a common Test Automation solution across these products in an effort to standardize the framework.

    However, this is not a good idea! Each product should be tested using the tools and technologies that are "right" for it. Yet - these different products talk with each other and you need to test the integration between them in an automated way.

  • place 6forum Ram Srinivasan

    The Conflict Paradox

    schedule 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
     
    place Sigma
     
    90 mins
     
    Workshop
     
    Intermediate
     

    It is not a question of if a team is going to have a conflict; it is a question of when. Equipping them to deal with conflict is more than creating agreements or having a good facilitator. We look at a conflict model that focuses on dynamics of conflict by understanding- 1. Cognitive skills:self-awareness about triggers, hot spots, emotions,behaviors. 2. Emotional skills:reading emotions, body language, balancing emotions, using curiosity 3. Behavioral skills:understanding others’ perspectives and needs, avoiding 8 destructive behaviors, embracing 8 constructive behavior. In an organizational setting, it is important to understand the source (culture, interdependence, incompatibility, personality, power, etc.) and types of conflict (cognitive vs. affective). Creating awareness about conflict processes, retaliatory cycles and building a conflict profile can empower teams engage in constructive disagreements. 

04:30
  • place 0forum Todd Little

    Risky Business: Real Options for Software Development

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Grand Ball Room
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Software projects are known to have challenges with estimation, uncertainty, risk, and commitment - and the most valuable projects often carry the most risk. Other industries also encounter risk and generate value by understanding and managing that risk effectively. Todd Little explores techniques used in a number of risky businesses - product development, oil and gas exploration, investment banking, medicine, weather forecasting, and gambling - and shares what those industries have done to manage uncertainty.

  • place 6forum Bernd Schiffer

    Net Promoter System for Agile Companies

    schedule 04:30 PM - 05:15 PM
     
    place Esquire
     
    45 mins
     
    Talk
     
    Intermediate
     

    Customer collaboration is essential to every Agile business. To create and collaborate to keep a customer is the purpose of an organisation. But still lots of companies try to make bad profits, i.e. profits earned at the expense of customer relationships. The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a renowned open-source system which addresses and measures customer collaboration. And did you know that you not only can use it to get feedback on your products and services, but also on your employees and your personal performance?

    NPS is a perfect fit for Agile companies - and those who want to be. Most of the companies I worked with (Agile coaching, training, consulting) had not heard about it, and far less were actually using it. This really surprises me, since NPS integrates like a charm with Agile, e.g. within product development via Scrum.

    In this session I'll explain the basics of NPS, i.e. promoters and detractors, satisfied and delighted customers, bad profits (how to deal with bad feedback?) and good profits, and why and how to measure these. Several stories from companies like Apple Retail, Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and others will help to make my point. I’ll further show why NPS is a very good fit with Agile regarding products, employees, and personal performance. Dos and Don’ts regarding NPS (also from personal experience) will close this session. Related to the Don'ts, I also cover some of the negative critiques out there.

05:00
05:30