• Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    As more and more companies are moving to the Cloud, they want their latest, greatest software features to be available to their users as quickly as they are built. However there are several issues blocking them from moving ahead.

    One key issue is the massive amount of time it takes for someone to certify that the new feature is indeed working as expected and also to assure that the rest of the features will continuing to work. In spite of this long waiting cycle, we still cannot assure that our software will not have any issues. In fact, many times our assumptions about the user's needs or behavior might itself be wrong. But this long testing cycle only helps us validate that our assumptions works as assumed.

    How can we break out of this rut & get thin slices of our features in front of our users to validate our assumptions early?

    Most software organizations today suffer from what I call, the "Inverted Testing Pyramid" problem. They spend maximum time and effort manually checking software. Some invest in automation, but mostly building slow, complex, fragile end-to-end GUI test. Very little effort is spent on building a solid foundation of unit & acceptance tests.

    This over-investment in end-to-end tests is a slippery slope. Once you start on this path, you end up investing even more time & effort on testing which gives you diminishing returns.

    In this session Naresh Jain will explain the key misconceptions that has lead to the inverted testing pyramid approach being massively adopted, main drawbacks of this approach and how to turn your organization around to get the right testing pyramid.

  • Krishnan Nair
    Krishnan Nair
    KK Sure
    KK Sure
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    We've come far in our journey of Agile as a software development methodology. From stand-ups to showcases to sprint planning meetings to burn-ups (or downs), we've got it down pat when it comes to processes to follow to be considered Agile. However this heads-down, process defined agile, often hinders real agility required to meet business needs. Is doing a three hour sprint planning meeting every week the most important thing to do when you have to get a minimal-viable-product out in the market? How much of automated functional testing should you do when you know that your product's beta version is only going to validate assumptions of your business idea? Should you write tests at all? There is no formulaic answer.

    In this talk, KK and Krishnan will talk about their experience of how much Agile is too much Agile. We look at how to find the right balance between following agile practices and being responsive to your business. How much agile is too much and how less is too less?

    We will do this by looking at:

    • A couple of successful agile adoption stories
    • Look at why agile was successful in the contexts above
    • Discuss why this success will limit us if we are not careful
    • Talk about a start-up and how the things that led to success in the first 2 stories limited us in the start-up context
    • Look at approaches to understand what agile practices/processes to follow to be business agile
    • Close by summarizing the challenges facing agile (as we see it) and how success in process agility will limit us in business agility
  • Liked DEBASHIS BANERJEE
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    Agilists - Detect, Protect and Celebrate IP Created During Sprints

    DEBASHIS BANERJEE
    DEBASHIS BANERJEE
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    In the context of continuous and periodic delivery of same day, monthly and agile incremental delivery in both established and startup contexts there is a possibility of teams missing key elements of protecting their IP. Some simple elements such as making your work public prior to protecting it can cause loss of business. Additionally in short sprints filing IP may not be the most important focus within teams (especially in startups or smaller companies where budgets might also be a constraint). In this session it will demonstrate (a) Some key elements of how to keep IP in mind in Agile sprints (b) Some general best practices of how IP can be used as a bond/glue for teaming (c) Some process changes possible to ensure IP becomes a key element of agile delivery. These is based on experience of over 6 years submitting IP self and also having 6 people having approved IP, 20+ people encouraged to submit and 75+ submissions. (d) As a influencer will provide some best practices to Leaders and Product owners to encourage IP. (e) Additionally IP can be a great occassion for team building and bonding and a retention tool.  Note: The session will be generic and will not cover any specific IP process of any company but a general set of practices via experiences

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