• Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In agile teams, it’s inevitable that team members are expected to be more cross-functional and produce high quality products for their customers. How can agile team members become more cross-functional and take ownership of quality? Often times there seems to be a scarcity of testing talents in agile teams. How can agile teams create high quality products when working with very few or no testing talents?

    For agile team members to take ownership of quality, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy exposes the power of “Pair Testing”, a technique that promotes rapid feedback to produce high quality products. For the scarce testing talents, an effective way to become more cross-functional, one approach is for team members to pair up on various (unit, integration, exploratory and several others) testing efforts that emphasize the shared eye on quality and learning. Pradeepa talks about several options for pairing opportunities between various specialties on an agile team. She also talks about some new opportunities to pair with DevOps, Operations, Sales, Marketing and Support members to name a few.

    As a new or an experienced agile team member, learn how to spearhead this technique in your team at various levels to generate buzz on other teams. As a tester, learn how to get the non-testing talents excited and experience the value of pair testing. 

    This session includes a fun Pairing activity and a Group discussion. 

  • Liked Asheesh Mehdiratta
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    Tales of (not so) successful Dev-Ops

    Asheesh Mehdiratta
    Asheesh Mehdiratta
    Debbie Wren
    Debbie Wren
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Advanced

    Welcome to the crazy world of Dev-Ops, where the tales span the spectrum from gruesome, grizzly to the heavenly and flowery bliss!

    The silo’d structures, the agonizing buy v/s build debates, the departmental handoffs, tooling and of course the cultural barriers, which all add fuel to the story unfolding in our brave new dev-ops world. But sometimes there are silver linings and the heavens part way for the shining stars to reveal their true glory.

    Join our session to listen to the tales of our (not so) successful dev-ops, and learn the lessons from our experiences.

  • Aslak Hellesøy
    Aslak Hellesøy
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Keynote
    Intermediate

    As lead developer of Cucumber and author of The Cucumber Book, Aslak gets asked to consult with organisations who want to introduce Behaviour-Driven Development (BDD). Time after time, he meets teams who are trapped doing half-arsed agile. They do the easy, obvious, visible agile practices, and none of the powerful, hard-to-master, hard-to-see ones.

    When these teams ask for help learning BDD, we get a chance to remind them how important conversations and collaboration are in software development. We teach them to write tests before they write code, as a way to explore and discover the hidden details of a requirement just before they dive in and start building it. This talk will make you wince with recognition, laugh with despair, and finally inspire you with stories of teams that have finally, after years of flaccid scrumming, discovered the true collaborative heart of agile software development. You’ll see patterns you recognise from your own teams, and gain insights about how to fix them.

  • Diana Larsen
    Diana Larsen
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Over the past ten years, software development teams using Agile approaches to work have adopted retrospective meetings as a critical practice for learning and continuous improvement. To the extent that practitioners say, “If you’re not holding iteration retrospectives, you’re not doing Agile.”

     Agile retrospectives at the end of each iteration or work increment set aside time for the team to examine feedback from current conditions and develop targeted tactics to keep the project on track. Many practitioners experience retrospectives as great means for detecting good, poor, and missing practices; as a handle to make tacit knowledge about effective practices explicit; and to define improvement actions in order to deal with ineffective or inefficient technical, process, and teamwork practices.

    However, too many teams and practitioners don’t reap the benefits that effective retrospective meetings can provide. Too many retrospective meetings receive cursory or inadequate facilitation. Too many retrospective meetings are held to  “check the box” on the project management template, rather than to focus on real improvements. For too many teams, the action plans coming out of retrospectives are never implemented or revisited. Too many teams seek to shift blame and responsibility for action through the retrospective.

    In too many organizations, retrospective meetings don’t deliver the promised return on time invested (ROTI).

    In this session, you’ll learn how to get the most from your retrospective practices. Diana Larsen, co-author of Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great, will introduce you to a simple framework for getting better outcomes from retrospective meetings, suggest ways to maintain the relevance of improvement to the work of your team, and provide tips and pointers to get great returns from the time your teams devote to every meeting. 

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