• Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    In order to achieve my goals, as a buyer of your product, I want awesome feature.

    AT: make sure your users stories don't get in the way.

    Users Stories, the tool teams use to break big ideas into small demonstrable deliverable, are easy to describe and challenging to write effectively. In this hands-on workshop you'll learn how to write great user stories that adhere to the INVEST principle. We'll learn various techniques to slice your stories using the vertical-slicing approach. We will discuss what elements should be included in the stories, what criteria you should keep in mind while slicing stories; why the size of your user story is important and how to make them smaller and efficient.

  • Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    Pradeepa Narayanaswamy
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In agile teams, it’s inevitable that team members are expected to be more cross-functional and produce high quality products for their customers. How can agile team members become more cross-functional and take ownership of quality? Often times there seems to be a scarcity of testing talents in agile teams. How can agile teams create high quality products when working with very few or no testing talents?

    For agile team members to take ownership of quality, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy exposes the power of “Pair Testing”, a technique that promotes rapid feedback to produce high quality products. For the scarce testing talents, an effective way to become more cross-functional, one approach is for team members to pair up on various (unit, integration, exploratory and several others) testing efforts that emphasize the shared eye on quality and learning. Pradeepa talks about several options for pairing opportunities between various specialties on an agile team. She also talks about some new opportunities to pair with DevOps, Operations, Sales, Marketing and Support members to name a few.

    As a new or an experienced agile team member, learn how to spearhead this technique in your team at various levels to generate buzz on other teams. As a tester, learn how to get the non-testing talents excited and experience the value of pair testing. 

    This session includes a fun Pairing activity and a Group discussion. 

  • Liked Ashish Parkhi
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    Techniques to Speed Up your Build Pipeline for Faster Feedback.

    Ashish Parkhi
    Ashish Parkhi
    Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    We would like to share our experience and journey on how we brought down our Jenkins build pipeline time down from over 90 minutes to under 12 minutes. In the process, we would share specific techniques which helped and also some, which logically made sense, but actually did not help. If your team is trying to optimize their build times, then this session might give you some ideas on how to approach the problem.

    Development Impact - For one of our build job, below graph shows how the number of builds in a day have increased over a period of time as the build time has reduced. Frequency of code check-in has increased; Wait time has reduced; failed test case faster to isolate and fix.

    Business Impact - More builds leading to quicker feedback and faster story acceptance and less story spill over.

  • Dipesh Pala
    Dipesh Pala
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    What could be more important for leaders than increasing their teams’ productivity? Conventional thinking would rank “increased motivation” as one of the most important tools for increasing productivity of teams.

       Motivation --> increases Progress --> increases Productivity

    This interactive session will disrupt and challenge the above notion, and will provide an alternative view:

       Progress --> increases Motivation --> increases Productivity

    Dipesh will be drawing upon more than a decade of research including 26 project teams, 7 companies and a deep analysis of nearly 12,000 daily diaries kept by team members, and use real case studies and examples to illustrate the following key elements:

       Catalysts – events and actions that help a team move forward

       Inhibitors – events and actions that can induce setbacks

       Nourishers – interpersonal interactions that lift team’s spirits

       Toxins – interpersonal interactions that undermine team’s spirits

    Awareness of the above principle is important and may sound simple; however turning the awareness of these elements into the inner workings of our daily routine takes discipline. With that in mind, all attendees will be given 'The Progress Enablement Checklist' that will assist them in making such behaviours habitual.

    If you are a leader or an aspiring leader of an Agile team, this session will provide clear implications for where to focus your efforts so that you do not worry about the wrong things. You will be inspired by knowing what serves to catalyse and nourish progress – and what does the opposite.

  • Liked Sean Dunn
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    Agile Architecture: A Contradiction in Terms? Our Journey in Discovering the Role

    Sean Dunn
    Sean Dunn
    schedule 2 years ago
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    45 mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    The role of "Architect" is sometimes frowned upon in the Agile community as a central command-and-control authority who bottlenecks decisions and limits team empowerment. Or at least, that is what we thought. Follow the real-life journey of our teams as we discovered how the role of an architect is compatible with Agile principles. We will explore our failures, and eventual discovery on how the role brings can bring an immense amount of value to the organization and the teams, especially on large, multi-team projects. 

  • Liked Tathagat Varma
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    From Waterfall to Weekly Releases: A Case Study in using Evo and Kanban

    Tathagat Varma
    Tathagat Varma
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    In 2003, we had a major problem to solve - our products had far too many open field defects, and the bug arrival rate was moe than the closure rate. We tried to fix using our process which involved shipping quarterly service packs, but that was not only elongating the lead time, it was also not very amenable to changes. The process for customer specials (specific features, etc.) was not any better, and invariably it led to exec-level escalations just to get some deal-blocking customer escalations into the service packs mid-way in the quarter.

    In 2004-05, we experimented with a pull system that limited the work in progress and created a more smoother flow of value. The result of this system was that we were able to significantly reduce the defect backlog, and were able to bring down cadence of features and bugs to a weekly cadence. The experiment was so successful that in about 6 quarters, we had fixed most of the field defects (brought down individual product's defect backlog to single digit) and we had to disband the team as there was no work left for them!

    We were inspired by Tom Gilb's "Evo" method and experimented with it to create a weekly cadence. However, we found that the nature of field defects and customer specials was stochastic in nature and didn't lend itself very well to a timeboxed framework like scrum. However, there were no off-the-shelf methods available back then that were a viable alternative. Hence, we experimented with various methods and blended-in elements form various methods to create out our very first kanban by limiting work in progress.

    In this talk, I will explain our first kanban experiment, and also compare and contrast with the later-day Lean Kanban by David Anderson.

  • Sneha Kadam
    Sneha Kadam
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    After revolutionizing the automobile industry, Lean principles have been successfully applied to different knowledge areas including software development. This workshop is intended to master Lean concepts like Waste, Push&Pull systems, systems thinking, Kaizen etc. & practicing cross-functional collaboration, self-organisation and safe-fail experimentation! In this interactive game, the participants will work in a small production lines, experiencing problems and applying Lean practices to overcome them.

  • Krishnan Nair
    Krishnan Nair
    KK Sure
    KK Sure
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    We've come far in our journey of Agile as a software development methodology. From stand-ups to showcases to sprint planning meetings to burn-ups (or downs), we've got it down pat when it comes to processes to follow to be considered Agile. However this heads-down, process defined agile, often hinders real agility required to meet business needs. Is doing a three hour sprint planning meeting every week the most important thing to do when you have to get a minimal-viable-product out in the market? How much of automated functional testing should you do when you know that your product's beta version is only going to validate assumptions of your business idea? Should you write tests at all? There is no formulaic answer.

    In this talk, KK and Krishnan will talk about their experience of how much Agile is too much Agile. We look at how to find the right balance between following agile practices and being responsive to your business. How much agile is too much and how less is too less?

    We will do this by looking at:

    • A couple of successful agile adoption stories
    • Look at why agile was successful in the contexts above
    • Discuss why this success will limit us if we are not careful
    • Talk about a start-up and how the things that led to success in the first 2 stories limited us in the start-up context
    • Look at approaches to understand what agile practices/processes to follow to be business agile
    • Close by summarizing the challenges facing agile (as we see it) and how success in process agility will limit us in business agility
  • Liked DEBASHIS BANERJEE
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    Agilists - Detect, Protect and Celebrate IP Created During Sprints

    DEBASHIS BANERJEE
    DEBASHIS BANERJEE
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    In the context of continuous and periodic delivery of same day, monthly and agile incremental delivery in both established and startup contexts there is a possibility of teams missing key elements of protecting their IP. Some simple elements such as making your work public prior to protecting it can cause loss of business. Additionally in short sprints filing IP may not be the most important focus within teams (especially in startups or smaller companies where budgets might also be a constraint). In this session it will demonstrate (a) Some key elements of how to keep IP in mind in Agile sprints (b) Some general best practices of how IP can be used as a bond/glue for teaming (c) Some process changes possible to ensure IP becomes a key element of agile delivery. These is based on experience of over 6 years submitting IP self and also having 6 people having approved IP, 20+ people encouraged to submit and 75+ submissions. (d) As a influencer will provide some best practices to Leaders and Product owners to encourage IP. (e) Additionally IP can be a great occassion for team building and bonding and a retention tool.  Note: The session will be generic and will not cover any specific IP process of any company but a general set of practices via experiences

  • Darren Davis
    Darren Davis
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    Kanban is one of the fastest-growing development methodologies today.  Teams increasingly turn to Kanban to simplify and streamline their agile development, but few people know the inside story of how and why Kanban was created.  The Secret History of Kanban pulls back the curtain and gives you a first-hand account of how Kanban went from being a colossal failure to a startling success, presented by one of the original team leaders.  Learn how a team turned theory into practice, what it means for the future of Agile, and how you can apply those lessons in your own organization.

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