• Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    In this highly engaging workshop attendees will experience estimating, planning and delivering a new product and product features.  The uncertainty in value and costs will be resolved through rolling dice based on the stories that the team selects and prioritizes.   The teams will run through 3 iterations of story cost, value estimation, and product feature delivery.  Points will be scored for delivering product features and meeting release and iteration commitments. 

    Dealing with uncertainty is one of the largest challenges that teams face.  The simulation aims to have levels of uncertainty in value and delivery that are commensurate with those found in software development.  Some of the key tools for dealing with uncertainty are integrated into the simulation.  In particular, the simulation covers these 4 areas:

    • Value of Information
    • Value of Flexibility
    • Cost of Delay
    • Value of Uncertainty

    Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the challenges of working with uncertainty in software projects, and will learn some of the tools that are at their disposal for managing this uncertainty.

  • Liked Evan Leybourn
    keyboard_arrow_down

    How much will this cost?

    Evan Leybourn
    Evan Leybourn
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner
    "How much will this cost?" 
    "How long will it take?" 
    "What am I going to get?" 

    These are the questions that every Agile project gets asked at some point. And while "as much as your willing to spend", "as long as necessary" and "whatever you ask for" are perfectly acceptable, many customers are uncomfortable with these answers. This may reflect more on the customer then the team, but can lead to the misconception that the development team is writing themselves a blank cheque. How then does an Agile team define and scope a project where the customer requires fixed time, cost or scope? 

    This presentation will provide guidance and direction on how to quote for and budget Agile projects, as well as how to change the questions in the first place.
  • Diana Larsen
    Diana Larsen
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Over the past ten years, software development teams using Agile approaches to work have adopted retrospective meetings as a critical practice for learning and continuous improvement. To the extent that practitioners say, “If you’re not holding iteration retrospectives, you’re not doing Agile.”

     Agile retrospectives at the end of each iteration or work increment set aside time for the team to examine feedback from current conditions and develop targeted tactics to keep the project on track. Many practitioners experience retrospectives as great means for detecting good, poor, and missing practices; as a handle to make tacit knowledge about effective practices explicit; and to define improvement actions in order to deal with ineffective or inefficient technical, process, and teamwork practices.

    However, too many teams and practitioners don’t reap the benefits that effective retrospective meetings can provide. Too many retrospective meetings receive cursory or inadequate facilitation. Too many retrospective meetings are held to  “check the box” on the project management template, rather than to focus on real improvements. For too many teams, the action plans coming out of retrospectives are never implemented or revisited. Too many teams seek to shift blame and responsibility for action through the retrospective.

    In too many organizations, retrospective meetings don’t deliver the promised return on time invested (ROTI).

    In this session, you’ll learn how to get the most from your retrospective practices. Diana Larsen, co-author of Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great, will introduce you to a simple framework for getting better outcomes from retrospective meetings, suggest ways to maintain the relevance of improvement to the work of your team, and provide tips and pointers to get great returns from the time your teams devote to every meeting. 

  • Jeff Lopez-Stuit, CEC
    Jeff Lopez-Stuit, CEC
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Pecha Kucha
    Beginner

    How can teams that have to deal with large, complex legacy systems get through planning and get to work? The title character of the classic American horror film, "The Exorcist" was a master at this..

    Pecha Kucha Talk Summary:

    • Introduction: Creating understanding through conversation can be very difficult for teams dealing with complex, legacy systems.

    • Introducing Regan McNeil: Poor Regan McNeil was starting go insane, but a team of doctors and specialists in close, face-to-face collaboration, couldn't solve her problem.

    • The Exorcist: The Exorcist knew how to have just enough conversation to get to work, so his team could deliver the value everyone had been working and praying for.

    • Summary: "In life, understanding is the booby prize". Sometimes the quest for understanding can be an impediment to delivering value. Having faith in self-organization, sometimes its best just to get to work.
Sorry, no proposals found under this section.