• ShriKant Vashishtha
    ShriKant Vashishtha
    schedule 2 years ago
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    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Way back in 2008, when I started working in Agile, there was enough material available on Scrum and. However when it came to distributed aspect of it, people were still struggling with it. Based on working for years in this fashion, I realised that communication, trust, transparency and innovation are the core fundamental values towards successful distributed Agile implementation.

    In other words, as most of the problems were caused by softer aspects of skills (misunderstanding, miscommunication, non-availability of people, mistrust etc), humanizing the distributed team experience looked like the key for successful distributed Agile implementation.

    Based on working with distributed teams over the years, we discovered some distributed Agile patterns. Some of them got blogged from time to time. Those already available in form of blogs are as follows:

    The session is to share the these patterns and more (when to go for distributed Agile and when not etc)

  • Dipesh Pala
    Dipesh Pala
    schedule 2 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    What could be more important for leaders than increasing their teams’ productivity? Conventional thinking would rank “increased motivation” as one of the most important tools for increasing productivity of teams.

       Motivation --> increases Progress --> increases Productivity

    This interactive session will disrupt and challenge the above notion, and will provide an alternative view:

       Progress --> increases Motivation --> increases Productivity

    Dipesh will be drawing upon more than a decade of research including 26 project teams, 7 companies and a deep analysis of nearly 12,000 daily diaries kept by team members, and use real case studies and examples to illustrate the following key elements:

       Catalysts – events and actions that help a team move forward

       Inhibitors – events and actions that can induce setbacks

       Nourishers – interpersonal interactions that lift team’s spirits

       Toxins – interpersonal interactions that undermine team’s spirits

    Awareness of the above principle is important and may sound simple; however turning the awareness of these elements into the inner workings of our daily routine takes discipline. With that in mind, all attendees will be given 'The Progress Enablement Checklist' that will assist them in making such behaviours habitual.

    If you are a leader or an aspiring leader of an Agile team, this session will provide clear implications for where to focus your efforts so that you do not worry about the wrong things. You will be inspired by knowing what serves to catalyse and nourish progress – and what does the opposite.

  • Liked Yuval Yeret
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    Kanban - A Way Towards DevOps in the Legacy Enterprise

    Yuval Yeret
    Yuval Yeret
    schedule 2 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    DevOps is a higher form of agility. It is a blueprint for a great culture and and process between the different groups involved in the delivery pipeline. The big question is how to achieve it. If you are founding a startup today, it can be quite easy to take that blueprint and use it to create your process, hire the right versatile flexible people, and start delivering without any technical/automation debt or friction. But most of us are not founding new startups. Most of us already have a running operation with people, culture, process that matured over the years and despite its flaws is currently the way we do things. Changing that is non-trivial. For things to change people need to understand WHY change, what we are changing, and we need an effective process for managing the change itself (HOW to change). So what ARE we changing to? DevOps is highly focused on looking at the whole value stream from idea to value and ensuring effective flow through this pipeline. Kanban is ONE way of HOW to change. It starts by visualizing all the work flowing in the pipeline, then managing the flow focusing on finishing things end to end rather than starting in order to stay busy. It continues to what we call the “Work in process Diet” – Straining the flow more and more in order to identify obstacles to tighter and tighter DevOps culture/operation and faster feedback cycles. You can expect to come out of this session with ideas how to take your current operation and DevOpsify it in a safe evolutionary way using the Kanban method.

  • Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    As more and more companies are moving to the Cloud, they want their latest, greatest software features to be available to their users as quickly as they are built. However there are several issues blocking them from moving ahead.

    One key issue is the massive amount of time it takes for someone to certify that the new feature is indeed working as expected and also to assure that the rest of the features will continuing to work. In spite of this long waiting cycle, we still cannot assure that our software will not have any issues. In fact, many times our assumptions about the user's needs or behavior might itself be wrong. But this long testing cycle only helps us validate that our assumptions works as assumed.

    How can we break out of this rut & get thin slices of our features in front of our users to validate our assumptions early?

    Most software organizations today suffer from what I call, the "Inverted Testing Pyramid" problem. They spend maximum time and effort manually checking software. Some invest in automation, but mostly building slow, complex, fragile end-to-end GUI test. Very little effort is spent on building a solid foundation of unit & acceptance tests.

    This over-investment in end-to-end tests is a slippery slope. Once you start on this path, you end up investing even more time & effort on testing which gives you diminishing returns.

    In this session Naresh Jain will explain the key misconceptions that has lead to the inverted testing pyramid approach being massively adopted, main drawbacks of this approach and how to turn your organization around to get the right testing pyramid.

  • Liked Evan Leybourn
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    How much will this cost?

    Evan Leybourn
    Evan Leybourn
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner
    "How much will this cost?" 
    "How long will it take?" 
    "What am I going to get?" 

    These are the questions that every Agile project gets asked at some point. And while "as much as your willing to spend", "as long as necessary" and "whatever you ask for" are perfectly acceptable, many customers are uncomfortable with these answers. This may reflect more on the customer then the team, but can lead to the misconception that the development team is writing themselves a blank cheque. How then does an Agile team define and scope a project where the customer requires fixed time, cost or scope? 

    This presentation will provide guidance and direction on how to quote for and budget Agile projects, as well as how to change the questions in the first place.
  • Liked Tathagat Varma
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    Design Thinking

    Tathagat Varma
    Tathagat Varma
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    An intro to design thinking ideas...

  • Liked Todd Little
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    Mythbusting Software Estimation

    Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 2 years ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Estimating software projects has proven to be particularly challenging.  Over-running schedules happens frequently in our industry.  As a result software estimation is often viewed as a black art.  In this session Todd will look into some of the reasons for these challenges by exploring a number of myths of software estimation and then setting out to validate or bust these myths.

    Some of the myths that will be explored include:

    • Historical Estimation Accuracy
    • Relative Estimation
    • The Cone of Uncertainty
    • Velocity
    • Scope Creep
    • Estimation Tools
    • Wisdom of Crowds
  • Krishnan Nair
    Krishnan Nair
    KK Sure
    KK Sure
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    We've come far in our journey of Agile as a software development methodology. From stand-ups to showcases to sprint planning meetings to burn-ups (or downs), we've got it down pat when it comes to processes to follow to be considered Agile. However this heads-down, process defined agile, often hinders real agility required to meet business needs. Is doing a three hour sprint planning meeting every week the most important thing to do when you have to get a minimal-viable-product out in the market? How much of automated functional testing should you do when you know that your product's beta version is only going to validate assumptions of your business idea? Should you write tests at all? There is no formulaic answer.

    In this talk, KK and Krishnan will talk about their experience of how much Agile is too much Agile. We look at how to find the right balance between following agile practices and being responsive to your business. How much agile is too much and how less is too less?

    We will do this by looking at:

    • A couple of successful agile adoption stories
    • Look at why agile was successful in the contexts above
    • Discuss why this success will limit us if we are not careful
    • Talk about a start-up and how the things that led to success in the first 2 stories limited us in the start-up context
    • Look at approaches to understand what agile practices/processes to follow to be business agile
    • Close by summarizing the challenges facing agile (as we see it) and how success in process agility will limit us in business agility
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