• Susan Gibson
    Susan Gibson
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate
    Surprisingly, not all enterprises have a vision. And, when you're talking about delivering products & services at scale, not having a vision, or, worse yet, having one that no one knows or believes in, results in chaos, which leads to confusion in the market and ultimately losing customers.
     
    Susan Gibson (SPCT) has worked with 1000's of change agents to create personal visions, that are then turned into compelling shared visions for their teams, divisions, and institutions. When individuals see themselves in the vision, that's when the enterprise hums. Susan will share stories of how these compelling shared visions gave the enterprises she's worked with the focus they needed to truly delight their customers.
  • Fabiola Eyholzer
    Fabiola Eyholzer
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    Traditional Performance Management systems are in deep crises. Their industrial era approach is unable to meet the demands and thinking of 21st century people and organizations. Join this interactive workshop to discuss how Lean | Agile enterprises can push the reset button and move from an administrative Performance Management process to a successful iterative performance flow.

     This is a highly participative open space session and we will cover questions like:

    • Why is there a need to push the reset button on Performance Management?
    • How do we approach goal settings in an agile environment? What is the best balance between collective vs. individual goals? Can you align individual goals with agile thinking?
    • Why is there a trend to eliminate employee appraisals? Are 360-feedbacks the new employee appraisals? Can we still promote people without appraisals and less/no hierarchical structure?
    • How valid are traditional bonus models or are there better ways for remuneration and acknowledgement?
  • Dan R Greening
    Dan R Greening
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    We need good agile managers, if we hope to sustain rapid adaptation and innovation. Agile managers deliver coherent chunks of value, rapidly adapt to changing circumstances, and experiment with new approaches. Because they depend on their teams to support their own agile needs, they demand agility from their teams.

    Management talent is rare, and agile management talent even rarer. Gallup has surveyed thousands of managers, finding that low-talent managers, unfortunately a majority, create dysfunctional teams, build unsupported products and produce little sustained value. So developing high-talent agile managers matters.

    Agile managers adopt five agile base patterns for themselves: they measure economic progress, proactively experiment to improve, limit work-in-process by time and costradiate collective responsibility, and collaboratively solve systemic problems. It turns out these patterns have analogues in high-talent (non-agile) manager talents. That’s a relief, because we can focus agile manager development on extending the talents good managers already have.

    In this workshop, we'll explore agile manager characteristics, and management dysfunctions. We'll create approaches to move good general managers to good agile managers. We'll explore strategies for dealing with mediocre managers, whether they are peers or superiors. And we'll learning how to improve our own management agility.

    This talk comes from well-documented experience. I have held management roles from Team Lead through VP Engineering and CEO. At Citrix, Skype, Amway and other large companies, I used agile to help manage a 24-member user-experience department, three different agile coach teams and a 50-member data science department. Much of this work has been described in conference papers and detailed blog posts.

     

  • Craig Brown
    Craig Brown
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    It's great to come to conferences and hear all the good advice from lost of smart and experienced people.

    But how likely are we to take our insights back and drive real change? What stops us from really changing the world?

    It's a truism that an inpidual can't beat the system, right? So how do we go about making change a collective agenda? How do we encourage leadership everywhere? We start by focusing on others rather than ourselves.

    In this interactive session I lead a series of small activities that model how we can go from a discussion with our friend about how things should be to leading change across the organisation. 

    I run three small discussions. Each one is designed to teach a method for increasing influence and effecting organisational change.  We pick the theme of "When I saw someone do something great/amazing at work" and each iteration we increase the number of people in the discussion, and make the stories more personal.

    This shows how in just three iterations of a discussion we can totally change the way we interact with the environment (i.e. the people in the wider business) and drive braver conversations.

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