• Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Keynote
    Advanced

    On Agile teams, collaboration is the way of life. Our leaders want their team members to work closely with each other, have shared goals and even think as one entity. Why? Because we believe that collaboration leads to happier, more productive teams that can build innovative products/services.

    It's strange that companies use the word collaboration very tightly with innovation. Collaboration is based on consensus building, which rarely leads to visionary or revolutionary products/services. Innovative/disruptive concepts require people to independently test out divergent ideas without getting caught up in collaborative boardroom meetings.

    In this presentation, Naresh Jain explores the scary, unspoken side of collaboration and explains in what context, collaboration can be extremely important; and when it can get in the way or be a total waste of time.

  • Vishal Prasad
    Vishal Prasad
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Consider an agile utopia executing a lean build-measure-feedback loop for software development. How would you feel if your biggest strength of receiving early feedback from your end-users turns out to be your Achilles heel? Recently I faced this dilemma where my end-users unfortunately were a group of introvert individuals. This led to Monger project’s MVP almost declared as a failure since it did not fulfill the end-user’s requirements. 

    Many a times, projects transform their delivery mechanism from traditional models to agile with a myth that agile is a recipe for success. In reality many projects fail since agile is not well understood by the teams. A few times (like in this case) the agile process falters not due to incorrect implementation but due to incorrect participants responsible to execute a part of the process.

    Experience with me what happens when your end-users falter your feedback loop just because of the nature of individuals. If you’ve ever been a part of a group (or may be in the future) where your end-users are introverts, learn from this experience report how we overcame this problem on the Monger project by strengthening our anemic reviews. At the same time, if you as a participant have been there and done that, I would love to hear about it.

  • Doc Norton
    Doc Norton
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    480 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Even high functioning teams occasionally have a hard time making decisions or coming up with creative ideas. There are times when the conversation seems to drag on long after a decision is reached. There are times when we have too many people involved in the discussion or the wrong people involved. There are times when we’re not sure whose the actual decision maker. And there are those times when we just seem to be out of synch with each other. This creative collaboration workshop provides tools that help resolve all of these issues. Come have some laughs with Doc, play with new friends, and learn one or two new techniques you can try at home.

  • Kalpesh Shah
    Kalpesh Shah
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    Great teams make great products, but what fuels this greatness? It's the common understanding and passion for the product but more importantly the singularity of purpose and the feedback loop and how the users are responding to the teams work. 

    The new world of product development is no longer about scope management and delivering the project on time and within budget but it's now more about hypothesis validation and learning from the users and their behaviors.

    The dynamics of product development is changing.  As more and more organizations are moving towards maturing their agile software development approach the traditional barriers of roles are being broken creating new opportunities and fostering a shift in the mindset. Instead of being tied down to scope management and delivering the project on time, Agile teams are focused and inspired by hypothesis validation and learning from the users and their behaviors.

    In this case study we will go over how a portfolio of 12 SCRUM Teams adopted a more outcome approach and how they shifted their mindset from project delivery in Agile way to adopting the Experiment-Measure-Learn-Repeat loop which plays a crucial role in teams overall motivation, performance and moved from being SCRUM Teams to "Product Teams".

    We will also see how we experimented with different team formats and how exposing the team members to different events and user research changed the way they perceived the information of the problem they were solving via features and user stories.

     

     

  • Krzysztof Czajka
    Krzysztof Czajka
    schedule 1 year ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Advanced

    What is it about?

    This is a story about building appreciation and feedforward culture in the organization.

    I am going to talk about a bottom-up experiment based on Jurgen Appelo's Merit Money, conduced in the biggest e-commerce company in Poland - Allegro Group. It is a story about learning throughout an Agile experiment to get the most out of it. Primarily the experiment was intended to challenge the existing bonus system based on forced ranking. It turned into appreciation and feedback system with some sweets involved. 

    This feedback system has grown to more that 230 people involved from 3 different physical locations and still grows virally. We made a structure in which there is a coordinator in each location. If at least part of scrum team plays the game, SM is the first line contact. He distributes credits and exchanges them for sweets. Also cooperates with coordinator who is responsible for making sure system works well in his location.
    Iterations are now 2 weeks. We introduced a requirement that credit has to be filled in with short description what you thank for, in order to be exchanged. This was to promote written thank you’s and avoid situations where people hand over credits just to get sweets.
    Also every quarter we change credits appearance so that the previous credits cannot be exchanged for sweets. This is to set a time box and “flush the system”.

    Is it for me?

    Do you feel your team could be more engaged in their work? Trying to get rid of silos in your organization? Then this is for you.

    Get inspired by this simple game, in which there are several instant feedback loops, fun, gambling and sweet prizes.

    Oh, I forgot... and you'll find an answer on why we call it Fudge Candies.

  • Liked Craig Brown
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Prioritizing backlogs across diverse stakeholders simply and easily

    Craig Brown
    Craig Brown
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    20 mins
    Talk
    Beginner
     
    Can we get 100 people to agree on what to prioritise to the top of a backlog? Sure we can. Can we identify a reliable systematic system we can use to get this done in just a few minutes? Of course we can.
     
    Requires 100 people to meet the claims in the session, but we can run this with ANY amount of people from 3 (Easy!) to 300 (Equally easy!)
     
    I learned this one from Alistair Cockburn in a pub. It's a neat trick.
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