On Agile teams, collaboration is the way of life. Our leaders want their team members to work closely with each other, have shared goals and even think as one entity. Why? Because we believe that collaboration leads to happier, more productive teams that can build innovative products/services.

It's strange that companies use the word collaboration very tightly with innovation. Collaboration is based on consensus building, which rarely leads to visionary or revolutionary products/services. Innovative/disruptive concepts require people to independently test out divergent ideas without getting caught up in collaborative boardroom meetings.

In this presentation, Naresh Jain explores the scary, unspoken side of collaboration and explains in what context, collaboration can be extremely important; and when it can get in the way or be a total waste of time.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Quick overview of collaboration and what it means
  • Deterrents for Collaboration (Why collaboration is hard)
  • Diversity - its meaning, purpose, objective and diversity in action
  • Introvert vs. Extrovert
  • Group-think Phenomenon
  • Drive - Autonomy, Mastery and Sense of Purpose
  • Design by Committee vs. Design by Community
  • Cynefin Framework to guide when to collaborate

Learning Outcome

  • Challenge the dogma that is killing creativity on Agile projects
  • Better appreciation for team mates who don't want to collaborate all the time
  • Understanding when to collaborate and when to do solo-deep thinking

Target Audience

Anyone who forces Collaboration down other people's throats and people who don't like collaboration

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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  • Maruthachalam
    By Maruthachalam  ~  1 year ago
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    This seems very interesting side of the collaboration. (really not the dark side)

    Are we overdoing with the word collaboration. As I understand, by definition, this doesn't mean, 100% of the time, every one in the team is working together. People are respected and left alone in their space. I teach in my team's to keep it around 40% of the time in pair programming. May be you could shed light on what is the Upper limit (may be % of time any 2 members can work together).


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