The 2015 state of scrum report published by Scrum Alliance states that the outlook of scrum is highly favourable. Virtually all consider it likely that their organization will use scrum in future. While this is good, the survey also noted one of the key challenges observed by survey respondents as “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices”. Thus, although scrum methodologies have greatly increased productivity, scrum is not without its problems. We need to quickly address this gap.

Keeping scrum values at the core, scrum methodology is mostly visible to teams on the ground in terms of three pillars (1) Scrum roles (2) Scrum artifacts and (3) Scrum events. While Scrum has kept scrum roles and scrum artifacts lean, it has empowered teams on the ground to learn the art of performing scrum. Scrum prescribed guidance on scrum events with clear purpose, frequency, maximum duration and recommended attendees. It recommends teams to learn the art of performing scrum events through their experience stating “scrum is easy to understand and difficult to implement”

While some scrum teams mastered this art, I find most of the scrum teams are still struggling in this process. I come across situations where teams are not finding scrum events interesting primarily because they find these events unproductive. The result is that we see less interactions and cooperation from the teams during scrum events. This is impacting basic agile manifesto “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools". In net, there is no surprise when product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices.

Lean Scrum is the need of the hour. As part of lean scrum, we will adopt scrum methodology at the core and we implement lean framework to address the pain areas witnessed by teams

As part of this talk, I will share my experiential insights on

  1. Outlook of scrum is highly favourable. Although scrum methodologies have greatly increased productivity, scrum is not without its problems. We need to quickly address these gaps
  2. While scrum has kept scrum roles and scrum artifacts lean, it has empowered teams on the ground to learn the art of performing scrum events. Are we keeping these events lean and Valuable?
  3. Lean scrum – The need of the hour
  4. What is Lean Scrum
  5. Anti-Patterns/Most frequently faced challenges/ wastes experienced by scrum teams in each of the scrum events (case findings based on my experience)
  6. Where do the scrum teams stand on "expected scrum patterns" in each of the scrum events (case findings based on my experience)
  7. Leverage "Lean Framework" to craft scrum events towards value generation. How to draw "AS-IS" and "TO-BE" Value stream management maps for two scrum events.
  8. Leverage "Lean framework" to help scrum teams to learn the art of performing scrum events through realizing value and enhancing their reach on "expected scrum patterns".
  9. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software” The term value is increasingly becoming starting point of what we do. We need to keep questioning everything we do using customer value generation as the yard stick

Unless, we drive scrum events towards value generation by continuously eliminating waste/ anti patterns, there is no surprise that “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices” as observed by "The 2015 state of scrum" report.

This is where Lean-scrum could prove to be powerful...

 

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

1. Setting the Stage: Outlook of scrum is highly favorable. Although scrum methodologies have greatly increased productivity, scrum is not without its problems. We need to quickly address these gaps

The 2015 state of scrum report published by Scrum Alliance states that the outlook of scrum is highly favorable. Virtually all consider it likely that their organization will use scrum in future. While this is good, the survey also note one of key challenges observed by survey respondents as “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices”. Thus, although scrum methodologies have greatly increased productivity, scrum is not without its problems. We need to quickly address this gap.

2. While Scrum has kept scrum roles and scrum artifacts lean, it has empowered teams on the ground to learn the art of performing scrum events. Are we keeping these events lean and Valuable?

Keeping scrum values at the core, scrum methodology is mostly visible to teams on the ground in terms of three pillars (1) Scrum roles (2) Scrum artifacts and (3) Scrum events. While Scrum has kept scrum roles and scrum artifacts lean, it has empowered teams on the ground to learn the art of performing scrum events. Scrum prescribed guidance on scrum events with clear purpose, frequency, maximum duration and recommended attendees. It recommends teams to learn the art of scrum through their experience stating “scrum is easy to understand and difficult to implement”

I will distribute a quick questionnaire to the participants to rate their scrum event performance (0% –Never, 20%-Rarely, 40%-Sometimes, 60%-Often 80%- Very Often, 100%- Always). This is to take the pulse of the audience and make them think that "we need to innovate the art of performing scrum events"

My practical insights: While some scrum teams mastered this art, I find most of the scrum teams are still struggling in this process. I come across situations where teams are not finding scrum events interesting primarily because they find these events unproductive. The result is that we see less interactions and cooperation from the teams during scrum events. In net, there is no surprise when product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices. This is impacting basic agile manifesto “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools".

3. Lean scrum – The need of the hour

What is Lean Scrum: As part of lean scrum, we will adopt scrum methodology at the core and we implement lean framework to address the pain areas witnessed by teams

Anti Patterns/Most frequently faced challenges/ wastes experienced by scrum teams in each of the scrum events (case findings based on my experience). I will take two scrum events and draw "AS-IS" and "TO-BE" Value stream mapping maps.  For rest of the scrum events, I will list out the lean tools that can help scrum teams to mitigate/address anti patterns

Leverage "Lean framework" to help scrum teams to learn the art of performing scrum events through realizing value and enhancing their reach on "expected scrum patterns".

4. Lean-Scrum: Potential Benefits

5. Finally: I will close the talk with the thought that “Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software” The term value is increasingly becoming starting point of what we do.  We need to keep questioning everything we do using customer value generation as the yard stick.

We need to challenge everything around us till we get convinced with below such questions. (A) What problem are we trying to solve? (B) How are we improving the actual work? (C) How are we building capability? (D) What leadership behaviors and management systems are required to support this new way of working? (E) What basic thinking, mindset, or assumptions comprise the existing culture, and are we driving this transformation?

Unless, we drive scrum events towards value generation by continuously eliminating waste/ anti patterns, there is no surprise that “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices” as observed "The 2015 state of scrum" report.

This is where Lean-scrum could prove to be powerful...

 

Learning Outcome

1. While scrum has kept scrum roles and scrum artifacts lean, it has empowered teams on the ground to learn the art of performing scrum events.

2. Anti Patterns/Most frequently faced challenges/ wastes experienced by scrum teams in each of the scrum events (case findings based on my experience)

3. Where do the scrum teams stand on "expected scrum patterns" in each of the scrum events(case findings based on my experience)

4. Leverage "Lean Framework" to craft scrum events towards value generation. How to draw "AS-IS" and "TO-BE" Value stream mapping maps for scrum events.

5. Leverage "Lean framework" to help scrum teams to learn the art of performing scrum events through realizing value and enhancing their reach on expected scrum patterns

6. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software” The term value is increasingly becoming starting point of what we do.  We need to keep questioning everything we do using customer value generation as the yard stick

7. Unless, we drive scrum events towards value generation by continuously eliminating waste/ anti patterns, there is no surprise that “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices” as observed "The 2015 state of scrum" report. This is where Lean-scrum could prove to be powerful

Target Audience

Scrum masters, Product owners, Development Teams

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Sachin goel
    By Sachin goel  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Krishnamurthy,

    Thanks for your proposal. I see a lot of focus on Scrum in this proposal. Curious to know how do you associate the ambguity around Start Ups and Scrum?

    Given the theme is Lean Start Up - how would you propose to convey to the participants to attend this session which is mostly focused on Scrum?

    Thanks

    Sachin

    • Krishnamurty VG Pammi
      By Krishnamurty VG Pammi  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Sachin,

      The Lean Startup isn't just about how to create a more successful entrepreneurial business...it's about what we can learn from those businesses to improve virtually everything we do. As TIM O'REILLY puts it, It's ultimately an answer to the question 'How can we learn more quickly what works, and discard what doesn't?

      Beyond doubt, agile scrum methodology is becoming increasingly popular for its relevance in solving enterprise lasting problems. Thus, there is lot we can learn from agile scrum success. However, it is not without it’s problems because teams are unable to discard quickly what does not work for them

      The 2015 state of scrum report published by Scrum Alliance states that the outlook of scrum is highly favourable. Virtually all consider it likely that their organization will use scrum in future. While this is good, the survey also noted one of the key challenges observed by survey respondents as “Product owners and teams were just not willing and/or enthusiastic about Scrum best practices”

      Using “Lean Scrum”, we are discovering the art of delivering value through performing scrum effectively and efficiently. That is, learning more quickly what works, and discard what doesn't?

      As part of this topic, we are trying to maximize the value of scrum where we build products in iterative way through involving customer feedback from time to time – a key ingredient of lean start up philosophy where Ries believes that customer feedback during product development is integral to the lean startup process.

      We are trying to help scrum teams to learn how to discover and discard what is not value adding to the teams through their own experience – This is again another key concept of Lean Startup philosophy where we eliminate waste and create value driven flow.

      I would propose participants below sequence of dots that justify lean Scrum joins the orbit of “Lean Start Up” philosophy

      1.       Continuous Improvement: The only way to grow your business is to constantly be testing new ideas.  Lean Scrum crafts value generation where teams continuously improvise their line of flow through below questions / mindset:

      a.       What problem are we trying to solve as part of this iteration?

      b.      How are we improving the actual work? How well do we put work in progress in priority order?

      c.       How much energy do we dedicate to continuous improvement?

      d.      What leadership behaviors and management systems are required to support this new way of working?

      e.      What basic thinking, mindset, or assumptions comprise the existing culture, and are we driving this transformation? 

      2.       Entrepreneurship is about effective management of value driven development. Lean scrum is enabling team to comprehend validated learning through their own experience. There by,  Most valuable product features are developed at short cycle time through eliminating waste 

      3.       The Build–Measure–Learn loop emphasizes speed as a critical ingredient to product development. Lean Scrum is enabling team to achieve speed and value through quickly learning what is value adding to their customers. 

      Finally, our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software”. The term value is increasingly becoming starting point of what we do. We need to keep questioning everything we do using customer value generation as the yard stick. We need to keep questioning everything we do using customer value generation as the yard stick.

      Lean Scrum joins the thought-orbit of “The lean start up” philosophy because through implementing Lean scrum:

      (A). Team understands Specified value from the standpoint of the end customers.

      (B). Identify all the steps in the value stream for each product family, eliminating whenever possible those steps that do not create value.

      (C). Make the value-creating steps occur in tight sequence so the product will flow smoothly toward the customer.

      (D) As flow is introduced, let customers pull value from the next upstream activity.

      (E) As value is specified, value streams are identified, wasted steps are removed, and flow and pull are introduced, begin the process again and continue it until a state of perfection is reached in which perfect value is created with no waste.

      Similar to the principles of lean management, Lean startup philosophy seeks to eliminate wasteful practices and increase value-producing practices during the product development phase so that startups can have a better chance of success without requiring large amounts of outside funding, elaborate business plans, or the perfect product.

      This is where Lean Scrum could prove to be successful

      Regards,

      Krishnamurty VG Pammi

       

  • Balaji.M
    By Balaji.M  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Krishnamurthy,

    Thanks for submitting the proposal and interesting topic, would like to know couple of things

    1) Would you be presenting with a case study or only the lean topics which could be incorporated during Scrum

    2) Also, please can you share the draft version of the deck which you are planning to present.

    Best Regards

    Balaji.M

    • Krishnamurty VG Pammi
      By Krishnamurty VG Pammi  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Balaji,

      I have uploaded my draft presentation. You can view the same at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2mjbui65byON1hHVnM0OWZEVjA/view?usp=sharing 

      Please let me know incase you need any furhter information.

      Regards,

      Krishnamurty

      • Balaji.M
        By Balaji.M  ~  2 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hi Krishnamurty,

        Thanks for uploading the draft version of the deck, will check and respond to you back.

         

        Thanks and Regards

        Balaji.M

      • Krishnamurty VG Pammi
        By Krishnamurty VG Pammi  ~  2 years ago
        reply Reply

        Hi Balaji,

        Yes... I will be presenting with case study findings. I am preparing draft version of the deck. I am hopeful to provide you the draft presentation by August 20th. 

        Regards,

         

        Krishnamurty


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      A common misinterpretation is that BDD is another way to automate the functional testing or just a synonym to Acceptance Test Driven Development (ATDD). However, it’s not correct understanding. BDD doesn’t talk about testing rather it focus on development which is driven by expected behaviour of application/system. It helps to share the understanding by examples among three amigos (BAs, Developers and Testers) and helps to explore unknown. It describes what business/end users want the system to do by talking through example behavior.

      In this workshop, the actual concept of BDD is explained using case study of various real-time projects. It also covers the myths, challenges, benefits and best practices along with tools used to adopt it.

    • Liked Vijay Bandaru
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      Vijay Bandaru - Let's solve a practical problem together using Lean Principles

      Vijay Bandaru
      Vijay Bandaru
      Agile Coach
      IVY Comptech
      schedule 2 years ago
      Sold Out!
      45 mins
      Workshop
      Beginner

      This topic has popped up in my mind through an observation of a practical problem I found yesterday. I thought to apply some lean principles to resolve this problem. I am proposing the problem statement here in this forum and the idea is to have an interactive workshop to come up with possible solutions to address this problem using Lean thinking/principles. Here are the details.

      Yesterday I visited Hyderabad Zoo (Nehru zoological Park) along with my cousins families. We are 12 members including adults and children. Earlier till November 2014, visitors cars were directly allowed inside with an additional fee of 200 rupees per car. I visited the Zoo before 2014 November and it was an awesome experience going by our own car and stop wherever you want for however long you want. Now, as they stopped allowing private cars inside, they arranged electric cars rides inside the Zoo. Below is the process and problem statement that I observed.

      1. The fee for one adult is 50 Rs and child is 30 Rs for Electric car

      2. Tickets will be given only at the entrance of the Zoo that is located outside the compound wall (You will not know how many members are waiting for electric cars inside)

      3. Tickets once sold cannot be refunded or exchanged

      4. There are limited electric cars available to cater the crowd (I got the info that around 25 cars)

      5. Each ride takes 40 minutes. It will stop at various locations where you can get down the car and visit the animals and come back to go to next stop

      6. Each car can take up to 12 members including the driver (

      7. You have to get onto the car at only one starting location and get down at the same point after the ride is complete. If you want to give away the ride in between its fine up to you

       

      The problems I observed and want to solve these problems by applying lean principles:

      1. At the time of buying the tickets:

           a. I did not have any clue on how many cars are there inside

           b. How long each trip takes

           c. How many members are in waiting

           d. Whether I can take the car and leave it at some place and visit the animals and by the time I come back after my visit there can be some other car available to take me to next stop or not

      2. I had to wait more than 1.5 hours to get my turn to have a car available

      3. The driver told that if I can give him 300 Extra we can take our own time to visit and he will not mind (this is the primary cause of the long queues I observed)

      4. Weekend visitors are more than 2 times of weekday visitors

      5. The queue is not properly managed so at times I observed people are joining in the middle of the queue and making it even more worst

      What I want to resolve:

      1. Reduce the waiting time

      2. Address the loophole of extending the ride by giving bribe to the car driver

      3. Address the queue management inconsistencies

    • Liked Jeganathan Swaminathan
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      Jeganathan Swaminathan - TDD - the good, bad and ugly part

      90 mins
      Tutorial
      Advanced

      Being an Agile Coach & TDD Consultant, I have helped many product companies during their Agile transformation journey. I have observed many interesting good, bad and ugly practices followed in industry in the name of TDD. I would like to share my experience with the audience and guide them towards the correct direction and help them extract the true benefit of TDD.

      To give a simple example, using code-coverage as a metrics to measure the effectiveness of the Unit Test Cases is one of the common mistakes committed by many companies. 

      In my presentation, I would like to demonstrate hands-on and discuss, how to effectively follow TDD and what to watch out and avoid bad practices in TDD.

    • Liked Manish Chiniwalar
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      Manish Chiniwalar - Workshop on Design Sprint - Concept to Confidence in less than 5 days

      960 mins
      Workshop
      Intermediate

      How fast can you go from an Idea to Reality?

      From an idea to the time you validate your solution with real users - not friends and family, how long does it take?
      In case you are yet to start, how long should you take?

      Lean Startup is a buzz-word these days. And for a good reason too - it works! But, there may be times when you get hung-up trying to validate with methods like landing pages, MVPs, MVFs and Interviews. And before you know it, a month has passed by, trying to generate traffic to your landing pages, making sense of analytics and polishing your MVP. 

      The Google Ventures' Design Sprint is a framework for solving real-world problems through research, ideation, prototyping and talking to real users, in 5 days or less.

      How will Design Sprint help?

      • Focus. First off, design sprint will put you on the clock. 3-5 days of complete immersion. 
      • Build the right thing. Taking a Design Thinking approach inspired by IDEO, will help you look at the problem the way your customer would. Then user your teams creativity to solve it in unique ways. 
      • See the Truth. When you'll put the prototype to test in the hands of a real user, your team will see first-hand what works and what doesn't. It's the next best thing to reading your customer's minds.
      • With a couple of days still left in the week, you relax with a cup of Earl Grey tea and do some more thinking. Probably, get ready for the next sprint.

       

      When we conducted design sprints with our customers, we had some unexpected realizations:

      • We saw that the ownership and motivation in the team improved significantly.
        They were mindful about "why" they were working on the features they were working on.
      • Our customers would say, "This has completely changed the way I think about building products." 
        Going from a solution driven approach to problem-first approach and keeping the products very lean.

       

    • Liked Neil Killick
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      Neil Killick - The Slicing Heuristic - A #NoEstimates Method for Defining, Splitting, Measuring and Predicting Work

      Neil Killick
      Neil Killick
      Lead Agile Coach
      MYOB
      schedule 2 years ago
      Sold Out!
      45 mins
      Talk
      Advanced

      This is a concept I devised a couple of years ago, and it seems there is a new #NoEstimates audience that would like to know more about it.

      A Slicing Heuristic is essentially:

      An explicit policy that describes how to "slice" work Just-In-Time to help us create consistency, a shared language for work and better predictability.

      The Slicing Heuristic seeks to replace deterministic estimation rituals by incorporating empirical measurement of actual cycle times for the various types of work in your software delivery lifecycle.

      It is based on the hypothesis that empiricism leads to smaller cycle time duration and variation (which in business value terms means quicker time to market and better predictability) because it requires work to be sliced into clear, simple, unambiguous goals. Crucially, the heuristic also describes success criteria to ensure it is achieving the level of predictability we require.

      Its application is most effective when used for all levels of work, but can certainly be used for individual work types. For example, a User Story heuristic can be an extremely effective way of creating smaller, simpler work increments, allowing teams to provide empirical forecasts without the need for estimating how long individual stories will take. However, if you are able to incorporate this concept from the portfolio level down, the idea is that you define each work type (e.g. Program, Project, Feature, User Story, etc.) along with a Slicing Heuristic, which forms part of that work type’s Definition of Ready.

      This talk will equip teams and organisations who are established on their Agile journey with a robust, clear and repeatable method for improving the quality and time-to-market of their software development efforts.

    • Liked Rahul
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      Rahul - How to measure the outcome of Agile transformation?

      45 mins
      Case Study
      Beginner

      With many organization moving to Agile environment, it is important to have a model that can help us identify if the Agile Transformation is resulting in the expected outcome. This session would present different measurement models to measure the outcome of Agile transformation in an organization.

      The paper covers various measurement models that can be used during different phases of Agile transformation. The session also presents outcome of a survey conducted by the author on how different organizations, Agile coaches & leaders are measuring effectiveness of their Agile implementation. It would present a research on how different organization perceive success of Agile adoption, what are the parameters used by different organizations and how different people present the changes observed by adopting Agile environment.

      e.g. 20% respondents each said ‘Delivery cycle time’ & ‘Delivering business value’ as the key parameters. And other 20% mentioned ‘Working Software’ / ‘Customer Satisfaction’ & ‘Reduction in defects, waste & risks’ as the parameters for measuring success of Agile.

      The session also presents a case study of Agile transformation where these different effectiveness measurement models were applied successfully. It covers various aspects like Business case definition of Agile implementation, Agile Transformation roadmap, Agile readiness assessment, Agile current state assessment, Agile effectiveness evaluation and ROI of Agile implementation.

      The session would also include an Agile Innovation Game, where the attendees would brainstorm with their peers on how they currently capture the changes brought by implementing Agile in their organization.

    • Liked Regina Martins
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      Regina Martins - The Spiderman antidote to the anti-patterns of Agile leaders

      Regina Martins
      Regina Martins
      Agile Coach and Trainer
      agile42
      schedule 1 year ago
      Sold Out!
      90 mins
      Workshop
      Intermediate

      Leading in an Agile environment is all about mindset and understanding what motivates people. This interactive workshop will unpack the superhero archetypes of Agile leaders with their related Agile leadership anti-patterns.

      Many leaders come into an Agile environment and feel threatened by a perceived loss of control. Successful Agile leaders empower the team and acknowledge that they can choose their own work and solve their own issues, pull themselves out of the detail and focus on supporting the team, know that if the team succeeds they do too, and are emotionally mature and are not constrained by ego.

      The best paradigm to frame the concept of leadership in Agile is that leadership is encouraged at all levels. As such everyone working in an Agile environment is a leader. In smaller organizations this is probably easy to encourage. In larger organizations, where the “Title” or “Position” predominates defines who is a “leader” and who is not, anti-patterns tend to emerge which do not support an Agile culture, even if it is the organisation’s stated vision to become Agile.

      In this instance the physical manifestations of Agile are put in place such as physical boards, Scrum ceremonies and an attempt at co-location are put in place. The danger here is that the Agile adoption will be a shallow one and will remain superficial. When the awesome magic of implementing Agile right is not achieved then people blame Agile as being the problem. It is not Agile that makes teams, projects and adoptions fail; it is people that cherry-pick those aspects of Agile that they like and are easy to implement that put the adoption on the path to failure.

      All too often leaders dismiss Agile as something the development teams do, rather than as something which affects them too, and that their role is important for its successful adoption. The role of leaders cannot be underestimated to turn a shallow adoption of Agile and make it a deep and lasting change for the organisation’s benefit. In this case, adoption in a small team or program will start the journey toward the tipping point that will make it a lasting organizational change.

      This may cause confusion, manifested as cognitive dissonance, in the leader. They may be asking themselves these questions:

      - How am I supposed to behave in a changing environment?

      - What behaviors am I supposed show to support the values and principles of Agile?

      - How do I support support the teams now?

      This workshop is based on my learnings and experiences as line manager of a development team in a large organisation, and Agile coach in large organisations in how leaders can in many instances unknowingly "sabotage" Agile initiatives, as well as experiential insights on what the enabling leadership behaviours and characteristics are.

      As part of this talk I will share the following:

      • What are the superhero archetypes of Agile leaders.
      • What are the related Agile leadership anti-patterns?
      • Discover the antidote to these anti-patterns (or the good patterns to replace the anti-patterns).