You've heard that quality belongs to everybody on an Agile team. You've heard that testers and developers should "collaborate" in order to drive quality higher. You've heard that automated tests help a team continuously validate the quality. It's time to stop thinking about it! It's time to stop talking about it! It's time to make it happen! 

Watch Ardi and Cheezy do this in front of your eyes. They will build a web application driven by acceptance and unit tests.You will see how a Product Owner, Tester and Developer will create executable User stories, develop the code to validate these stories and refactor along the way. At the end, you will get a taste of what a Continuos Delivery pipeline looks like. Prepare to collect your jaws from the floor!

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

We will be developing a web application live in front of the audience.  First of all we will introduce the idea of acceptance test driven development, how the stories are elaborated by the team and product owner, and then talk about the application we will build.  We start with a few acceptance criteria and then Ardita will automate that criteria using Cucumber.  As she is completing some of the tests, Cheezy will run those tests against the application and use test driven development to make those tests pass.  In the end the audience will see the finished application.  At the end of the talk the idea of continuous deliver is explored and how these practices are used in that context.

Learning Outcome

The audience will be exposed to ATDD, TDD, and very close collaboration between product owner, tester, and developer.  The will see what happens when the entire team focuses on quality.  Finally, the will get a sense of how these practices fit into a continuous delivery development approach.

Target Audience

Developers, Testers, Product Owners, Scrum Masters

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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  • Joel Tosi
    By Joel Tosi  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Cheezy / Ardita,

          Thanks for the submission.  Is this a pure demo or is there any hands on for the attendees?  I'm concerned that 90 minutes of watching is a bit much. Also, the attendees have an understanding of TDD and some ATDD - would this session still be valid for them?  If so, how much of this is take-away-usable for attendees with that familiarity?

     

    Best,

    Joel

    • Cheezy
      By Cheezy  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Joel,

      Thanks for your feedback.  The talk demonstrates both TDD and ATDD.  We will build an application that is driven by automated acceptance tests (written in Cucumber) and then use those with TDD to build out the application.  The purpose of the talk is to demonstrate the communication and tight feedback loops between the tester (automated the acceptance tests) and the developer (used those tests and tdd to build the app), and other testing that the tester performs (exploratory, other automation, accessibility, etc) in order to achieve continuous delivery. 

      In the talk we spend a fair amount of time describing the workflow for ATDD and the collaboration with the product owner.   Then we doing the coding exercise.  After the coding is complete, we talk about how this we then finish the talk with a discussion about continuous delivery and how this practice fits into that practice as well as talk about what some typical build/deliver pipelines might look like.

      We just presented this talk at SDEC yesterday in a 70 minute form and had to cut the coding portion short.  I don't feel there would be any problem with the 90 minute session but I am interested in hearing more about your concerns.

      -Jeff

      • Joel Tosi
        By Joel Tosi  ~  2 years ago
        reply Reply

        Thanks for the response Cheezy.  We should have just jammed on it at SDEC ;)

         

        My concern is partially at just the delivery level and partially at the macro level.  At the delivery level, watching a demo can work well, it is just a more challenging route to keep people engaged as well as get them with tangible takeaways.  Would the coding you do be accessible via github or something like that after?  

        At a macro level, I am concerned that we may have too many demos happening in the overall track which would be a questionable experience for attendees.

        Best,

        Joel