• Joy Montello
    Joy Montello
    schedule 4 months ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Sixteen years ago the ‘Agile Manifesto’ was written out of a “need for an alternative to documentation driven, heavyweight software development processes”[1]… but since then, the word “agile” has been confused with a synonym for project management, and it seems that teams are struggling to catch up to “modern” overhead in the name of “Agile” instead of having the freedom to focus on delivering value.  

    In this session, using the Merriam-Webster dictionary definition of agility (“marked by ready ability to move with quick easy grace”[2]), we will explore agility in the BI and data space and how it can actually work.  We’ll dive into the product thinking framework we’ve used to help data product and business intelligence teams get clear on their goals and then move toward them with clear focus and low overhead.  I will share the background for our framework (as well as some non tech examples that support our approach) and share some actual examples of how some of our teams have employed it to deliver measurable impact, howe we measure and secrets to BI agility.

    [1] http://agilemanifesto.org/history.html

    [2] http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/agile

  • Liked Prasad
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    DevOps lead IT Transformation story of an Investment Bank

    Prasad
    Prasad
    schedule 5 months ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Total cost of ownership of the Investment Bank IT portfolio is way too high. Business is also keen in getting high responsiveness from IT. There is high desirability from all stakeholders in changing the way IT work. Based on a value stream analysis, key  aspects that impede speed and value are identified. Common and prominent impediments identified are silo, handovers, local optimization, manual and inefficient software engineering.  Principles and practices of DevOps seems to be an excellent fit for this change. This means new capabilities for IT workforce, new operating model, new way of measuring, new way of aligning with other corporate groups like security etc.  This session is a journey in progress of IT transformation using DevOps as core theme.  Where to begin? What to change? How to create capabilities? How to onboard teams into this wave? How to sustain? Where are we now? Where we want to reach? Lessons learnt?

  • Liked David Laribee
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    Testing Strategy: New Model, Better Outcome

    David Laribee
    David Laribee
    schedule 5 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Pyramids? Quadrants? Cupcakes?! There are a wide array of models that describe approaches to test automation strategy and their possible positive (or negative) outcomes.

    In this talk, we’ll survey the landscape of testing models: models that range from technical to product to cultural mindsets, including best practices and anti-patterns. I’ll add detail and nuance to each of these models in the form of professional experience, real world example, and case study. 

    With a new lens, focusing on testing strategy as an act of curation, I'll share a new approach to evolving a testing strategy appropriate for your product development team's specific context.

  • Liked Ankur Sambhar
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    Path to Devops: Cloud Native Applications

    Ankur Sambhar
    Ankur Sambhar
    schedule 3 months ago
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    20 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Migration to Cloud is the need of an hour as it brings in the required agility to the way the applications are built and hosted. With ever changing business needs, Cloud enables the agility to deliver high quality software quickly and that too consistently. In the current market scenarios, it provides significant benefits to the organizations to be able to respond swiftly to changing business needs.

    As a seasoned technologist, this talk will be my experience sharing on migrating a business critical enterprise application to be Cloud Native. It will allow me to take you to our journey and share our experiences/learnings on the way about how it brought a change in our mindset while designing the application to be fault tolerant and resilient to failures, what are the processes/tools that worked for us, what are the challenges that we faced and overall what have we actually achieved out of it.

    All in all how it moved us one step closer to DevOps :)

  • Naresh Jain
    Naresh Jain
    schedule 2 months ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Advanced

    By working with some of the most successful tech-product companies, I realised that code is NOT an asset, it's a liability. We should strive hard to minimise code. In 2011, when I started to hack on ConfEngine, I questioned my belief in TDD. I had also started playing around with APL style Array-Programming and Functional Programming. I felt, may be, I was getting a bit too dogmatic about TDD and automated tests in-general. As a thought experiment, I decided to build ConfEngine without ANY automated test. At first, it was really scary not to have the safety-net of automated test (something I took for granted for almost a decade.)

    As I scaled ConfEngine without any automated tests, I had certain interesting realisations:

    • How to embrace Simplicity and Minimalism WITHOUT automated tests
    • Why Throwing Away Code frequently helps you achieve a better decoupled-design and how this helps in better experimentation
    • Fear of Refactoring WITHOUT Tests is over-rated (Good IDE and safe-refactoring techniques can take you a long way)

    ConfEngine grew from a pet-project to a 8 member product team. It has over 60K users and has done financial transactions worth over half-million USD. And we continue to push forward without ANY automated tests. Its not perfect, but it has certainly helped me challenge my dogma around TDD.

    Background: In 2001, I stumbled upon the Test Infected paper. For the next 2 years, I struggled to really apply the test-first concept on real projects. Finally in 2003, I felt that I had fully internalised TDD and was able to apply on almost all projects. Then I started playing around with FIT and FitNesse, using ATDD on some of the projects. In 2006 I published "Avatars of TDD" paper in which I explained various styles of TDD and its design implications. Until 2011, I was a very big advocate of TDD, ATDD and BDD. I still like those practices, however I would not recommend it in all projects.

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