schedule Mar 10th 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM place Mysore Hall 1 people 56 Attending

“Every line is the perfect length if you don't measure it.”  - Marty Rubin

So your organization has embarked upon a transformation to be more nimble and responsive by employing the latest tools and thinking in the Agile and DevOps arena.  In this transformational context, how do you know that your initiatives are effective?  Empirical measurements should provide insights on business value flow and delivery efficiency, allowing teams and organizations to see how they are progressing toward achieving their goals, but all too often we find ourselves mired in measurement traps that don't quite provide the right guidance in steering our efforts. 

Rooted in contemporary thinking and tested in practice, this talk explores the principles of good measurement, what to measure, what not to measure, and enumerates some key metrics to help guide and inform our Agile and DevOps efforts.  If done right, metrics can present a true picture of performance, and any progression, digression of these metrics can drive learning and improvement.  

It is our hope that this session inspires organizations and teams to start or take a fresh look at implementing a valuable measurement program.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Problem Context
  • Principles of Measurement
  • Measurement Dimensions
  • Enumeration of some Key Metrics
  • Value of Measurement & Getting Started
  • Q&A

 

Learning Outcome

  • Gain an understanding of how metrics can help quantify software progress and quality and engender a more open and honest conversation among the various stakeholders
  • Provide a glimpse into current research and thinking on good measurement practices and metrics
  • Take away ideas for establishing a meaningful measurement program within your own organization
  • Learn how to use the objective evidence from metrics in steering your Agile and DevOps initiatives

Target Audience

IT leaders, technical managers, developers, testers, operations and agile change agents

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Niranjan N V
    By Niranjan N V  ~  11 months ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Raj and Robert,

    Has these recommendations are tried out in any place and It would be great some real life examples or case study are shared in the presentation deck. 

    Regards

    Niranjan

     

    • Raj Indugula
      By Raj Indugula  ~  11 months ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Niranjan,

       

      All of the examples depicted in the slides are based on real-life examples of what we tried and the lessons learned.

  • Abraham L C
    By Abraham L C  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi

    Metrics / Measurements are real challenge in Software context.

    1. Will you be covering the application of the metrics (Slide 14) and their interpretation in real time context?

    2. Do you cover any specific example / case study - how they were measuring the end-to-end deliver process (may be relating or connecting the specific metrics)?

    3. This will be become more interesting session if OPERATIONS SUCCESS related metrics

    A case study / experience will help as this topic is bit challenging

    Best Regards

    Abraham L C

    Abraham L C

    • Raj Indugula
      By Raj Indugula  ~  11 months ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Abraham,

      Yes, we will be covering our experience with the application of some (not all) of the metrics from slide 14 and some of the adaptations we made along the way to cater to our specific needs.  We will also relate how the choice of a specific measure drove behavior changes across the delivery process.

  • Balaji Ganesh N
    By Balaji Ganesh N  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Raj / Robert,

    This proposal is tagged under lean product discovery.

    But the presentation does not clearly bring out the linkage between identifying the right metric and how it enables lean product discovery.?

    Also, some of the topics like how measurement impacts behavior and in turn the culture, would better fit under "agile mindset".

    Look forward to your inputs on how you plan to address the above items in your talk.

    Regards,

    Balaji

     

    • Raj Indugula
      By Raj Indugula  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Balaji,

      Thanks for the comments and you do raise a pertinent question about the appropriateness of the current tag.  I actually was in two minds about tagging it under Lean Product Discovery as well, but did so given that there's guidance that seemed to suggest metrics and measurement related submissions belong there.  Perhaps, that thinking was based on the premise that topic submissions around pirate metrics and such which are strongly rooted in the Lean-startup movement, do make for a natural fit in that category.

      This talk was inspired by the work we are doing in a large federal multi-team enterprise increasingly moving towards a Continuous Delivery/Continuous Operations-inspired model and it fits more naturally within the DevOps track.  It could tagged in the agile mindset space perhaps, but my belief is that the message and insights here are more resonant in the DevOps track.

      Thanks again for making the time to peruse the submission and for the comments/questions.

      -Raj

       


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  • Liked Benji Portwin
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    Benji Portwin / Joakim Sunden - Spotify, how we scale agile and what doesn't work the way we hoped it would

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Spotify is no longer a small company comprised only of techie music enthusiasts from Sweden. It now has 2000+ employees spread across the globe and is a global major player in the music and entertainment space, and they have no intention of slowing down.

    Such rapid growth carries big challenges. How can they continue to improve their product at great speed, while growing the numbers of users, employees and supported platforms and devices? How do they keep our agile values as they grow?