For an enterprise organization it is critical to ensure that the software being built remains relevant to the market. Be it a product or a service, from the inception to the launch, an organization could encounter changes in the business environment, which could impact how the product/service shall succeed in the market. What was originally important to the customer may change as new challenges in their own industry environments and budget constraints surface.

In my organization we are creating software which has a development life cycle of 6 months to 12 months, during which our customers’ needs changed (which we were not cognizant of). Lean Product Discovery helped us accommodate these changing customer needs in a competitive data center infrastructure business.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

In this session I will share my experience on how Lean Product Discovery ensured that we continuously gather customer feedback, measure metrics to improve and accommodate changes into the product road-map. 

This session shall cover the following topics in order for 40 mins:-

  1. Establish why follow this process for commercial success
  2. Challenges faced in my organization before adopting Lean Product Discovery
  3. Measure key business metrics incorporating Customer feedback
  4. Identify new factors which impact decision making.
  5. Three questions which we ask in every Product Increment

The last 5 minutes is reserved for any Q&A.

Learning Outcome

  1. Awareness of Best Practices followed in the Industry
  2. Key Metrics to measure to ascertain market relevance of software
  3. Evolve a set of questions to ask during Product Increment or Intermediate Milestone

Target Audience

Product Managers, Product Owners, Architects, Engineers, All those people who are making decisions on what to build into the software

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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  • David Hussman
    By David Hussman  ~  11 months ago
    reply Reply

    I am sorry to be late to comment. After reading the proposal and the associated comments, my comment is that the topic is very wide and would benefit by being narrowed down to something closer to the title. Can you update the description to make it more crisp and more succinctly about the point / outcomes for the session?

    • Venkatesh Prasad
      By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  11 months ago
      reply Reply

      Hi David, 

      I have updated the title, description and outcome to explain how Lean Product Discovery helped us embed customer focus into the development lifecycle.

      Rgds,

      Venky

      • Venkatesh Prasad
        By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  11 months ago
        reply Reply

        I have also modified the slide deck with additional details on thought process and metrics.

        Rgds

    • Venkatesh Prasad
      By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  11 months ago
      reply Reply

      Thank you David, for the feedback. I returned from travel today, I shall provide an update by tomorrow.

      Rgds,

      Venky

  • Sunil Lingappa
    By Sunil Lingappa  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Nice Thought. A very important question to keep in mind when you design a software or come up with a product.

  • Matteo Taddei
    By Matteo Taddei  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Hi, any chance we can make it a 20min talk?

    I was thinking for instance 7min for the first 3 sessions leaving the 4th one to the audience (the key takeaways)

     

    Thanks

    • Venkatesh Prasad
      By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Matteo, 

      I think that would be bit of a rush-through. In the past when I have conducted this, it took an hour.

      There are details which I would delve into for each of the bullet points listed in the slides for 2nd, 3rd and 4th topics.

      Even with your proposal, it works out to 7 mins * 3 topics = 21 mins, which goes beyond the 20 min boundary already, leaving 4th topic untouched.

      If the committee is facing a challenge in finding a slot, then I am willing to attune, however I am not sure if the audience would be satisfied.

      Rgds,

      Venky

  • Shiv Sivaguru
    By Shiv Sivaguru  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Venky,

    can this approach be used in an enterprise scenario also, to draw up the corporate IT plans, where it not so much of 'selling', but more of delivering value faster to the business units that need IT to support their activities?

    • Venkatesh Prasad
      By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Yes Shiv, this approach definitely applies in that scenario as well. For the IT dept, the Business Units (BUs) are the customers they serve. Today, the internal IT has the ownership of several business applications hosted on SaaS, HR, payroll applications for employee support, CRM and Sales applications to support BUs' sales management, large hardware infrastructure for R&D, etc.

      The service that IT provides to individual business units, as a whole, has a bunch of features with associated SLA, post-delivery maintenance guarantee, all of which is akin to a product offering. So the principles of Lean-Product-Discovery are definitely applicable.

      Given the changing needs of their business, the BUs also change their requirements on IT, so it is imperative for the IT dept to ensure that their service is always relevant to the BUs. Now different BUs have different needs in the same application or infrastructure, so the IT dept needs to make an on-going assessment of whether they are meeting the needs of these businesses. Anytime the IT is not able to meet their SLA, the IT dept is pulled up for non-compliance.

      A recent example is when my BU needed to leverage AWS for some internal testing urgently for our customer, whereas a dedicated AWS compute space was in the IT dept's charter, but not immediate. Because they engaged regularly with us, we could highlight our urgent need, and they changed their priorities quickly to deliver us what was required. If they had not complied, we would have been forced to go out of the cycle and purchase ourselves (which we were ready to). I also have seen examples in the past where the result was opposite :)

      So if IT has to succeed and deliver greater business values to BUs, it has to be nimble enough to adapt to the changing needs of the BUs.

       

  • Prasad
    By Prasad  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Thanks for the proposal, hope you will be covering, key business metrics that were important to you folks, techniques that are used to gather data for validation.  It will be interesting for the community on your decisions related  to pivots, and factors influencing towards that. 

    • Venkatesh Prasad
      By Venkatesh Prasad  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Definitely. I shall explain key metrics such as feature usage, active-user-list, CAC (customer acquisition cost), CRC(customer retention cost), that helped us understand the importance of balancing competing features for the product. Also the factors which influenced our decisions is something I plan to cover.

      Good Feedback, I can touch upon the techniques we used to gather this data.

      Rgds,

      Venky


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