Better. Faster. Cheaper. Many IT organizations are constantly seeking the "best" practices that will deliver those characteristics, and the fact that they continue to search indicates they haven’t found them yet.

It could be they are looking in the wrong place. Most efforts around achieving better, faster, cheaper center around becoming ultra efficient.

Effectiveness may just be the better target.

Join Kent McDonald to explore the difference between efficiency and effectiveness and learn three simple, yet powerful, techniques that he has found can help teams be more effective. You’ll learn how to:

  • Build a shared understanding of the problem you are trying to solve
  • Establish clear guard rails for distributed decision making
  • Measure progress based on outcome, not output

Along the way he’ll share stories about how he has used these techniques and help you figure out when these techniques may work in your situation.

You may be able to get faster and cheaper with efficiency, but in order to get better outcomes, you need to be effective. Come to this session to learn how.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Current Situation: A lot of teams are asked to be Better, Faster, and Cheaper - a combination which is hard to attain, and often results in a focus on efficiency, leaving the "better" aspect behind. Establish that problem and suggest a focus on effectiveness (ie doing the right thing) may be better. Introduce three techniques for being more effective:

  • Build a shared understanding
  • Provide Guardrails for Decision Making
  • Measure based on Output Not Outcome

Build Shared Understanding - introduce the use of the problem statement to build a shared understanding. Share a story of where I've used this technique.

Provide Guardrails for Decision Making - Introduce Decision Filters and describe how I've used them in projects I've worked on. to help teams make decisions.

Measure Based on Outcome Not Output - show I've used Goals and Objectives to provide a more meaningful understanding of progress and success.  Also describe the Parking lot diagram and show how it can show progress more closely related to Outcome than what Burndown charts do.

Learning Outcome

  • Build a shared understanding of the problem you are trying to solve
  • Establish clear guard rails for distributed decision making
  • Measure progress based on outcome, not output

Target Audience

Product Owners, Scrum Masters, Business Analysts, Project Managers

schedule Submitted 8 months ago

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