DevOps and the Software lifecycle - in 10 aspects

There has been a lot of expectation around DevOps and discussion on what DevOps is and is not. 
While most of the buzz is around tools, culture, automation etc, there is not much on the impact on the software delivery life cycle.
In this session, I propose to overlay the implication of DevOps thinking on the lifecycle - from concept [backlog] to delivery [to the user]

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The Software Delivery Lifecycle is split into 10 aspects to consider:

1.Backlog management

2.Full life cycle

3.Configuration management

4.Architecture

5.Shifting left

6.Managing the user experience: deployment

7.Continuous Deployment and Delivery

8.Monitoring the user experience : track and analyze

9.Governance

10.Feedback loops

a brief overview of each of these would be presented in this lightning talk of 20 minutes.

If more time is available - this could also be a 45 minute session.
if it is, I can talk about some of the architectural implications or common good practices [and popular tools] for each of these areas briefly

Learning Outcome

The attendees will get an understanding of what may need to change in specific practices across the life cycle that can be used as a starting point to chart out their DevOps journey

Target Audience

Software Developers and Testers, Architects, Managers, IT operations professionals

schedule Submitted 11 months ago

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comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Joel Tosi
    By Joel Tosi  ~  11 months ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Siva,

       Good to see submissions from you ;)  This seems like quite a bit for 20 minutes - at 10 points plus time for questions / intro - you are maybe 90 seconds per point.  That seems to fast.  Also, could your attendees take away 10 ideas and be able to apply them?  

     

    What would happen if you chose 4 or 5?  Would the presentation still make sense / be valuable?

    Best,

    Joel

    • Shiv Sivaguru
      By Shiv Sivaguru  ~  11 months ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Joel,

      you are right.

      20 minutes is tight, but I have done it like a lightning pitch.

      not all points get covered equally - the first 5 are more popular with the developer audience and the ones related to deployment, user experience or feedback with people with an IT operations background.

      The video recording is a little over 20 minutes.

      As I have mentioned in my proposal, with 45 minutes some justice to all the points can be done.

      Since the treatment is at a beginner level, 20 minutes should be sufficient to kindle some curiosity.

      owever, if a 45 minute slot is available, would be happy to expand the discussion.

      • Joel Tosi
        By Joel Tosi  ~  10 months ago
        reply Reply

        Thanks Siva,

        Is your goal with this session more awareness or something else?  i.e. would you hope / expect attendees to apply something / try something the following week based upon your session?

        • Shiv Sivaguru
          By Shiv Sivaguru  ~  10 months ago
          reply Reply

          Joel,

          I see that the proposal status is rejected. Thanks for the consideration.

          But, to close the thread, here is my response. I was tied up with something else and could not respond earlier.

          For each of these themes, I would hint at [in a 20 minute session] or mention three aspects:

          1. implication on architecture or design to be more DevOps ready [trunk based development for config management, for example],

          2. some good practices [a/b testing to validate requirements] and

          3. also some of the popular tools related to this

          In a 20 minute format, I would be able to cover just one of these. a 45 minute session could take it to a more detailed discussion

          • Joel Tosi
            By Joel Tosi  ~  10 months ago
            reply Reply

            Evening Siva,

               Thanks for the response even after the decision, I do appreciate the follow-up.  I hope all is well. For what it is worth, I do like the two bullet points, though I would be concerned that they are two separate talks instead of one if that makes sense?  

            Either way, thanks for the follow up, hope to touch base some day

            Best,

            Joel


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