Agile Leadership: Accelerating Business Agility

Leaders today face constant, accelerating change driven by technology and incredibly high expectations from both internal and external customers. Surviving and thriving in this environment requires IT leaders who can reliably deliver the following:

  • Innovation that drives the organization forward
  • Innovation centered on creating competitive advantage
  • Results in the face of dramatic change and ambiguity
  • Excellence in delivery
  • A culture of motivation and agility
  • Relationships of trust both inside and outside of the organization

In short, as IT leaders we need to transform our roles and our departments. But, what can we use to pull off this transformation? In this workshop, we focus on, teach and practice the tools of transformational leadership.

Part one of the training dives deep into the Purpose Alignment and Business Value Models. These tools are proven and can be put to use immediately. Part two of the training covers tools leaders use to re-define their roles using the Trust / Ownership Model including agile principles.

All of these tools are concrete, pragmatic, and usable. After each part of the training, participants are ready to use the tools to re-define their roles and deliver what their organizations need – brilliant leadership.

 
 

Outline/structure of the Session

Leaders today face constant, accelerating change driven by technology and incredibly high expectations from both internal and external customers. Surviving and thriving in this environment requires IT leaders who can reliably deliver the following:

  • Innovation that drives the organization forward
  • Innovation centered on creating competitive advantage
  • Results in the face of dramatic change and ambiguity
  • Excellence in delivery
  • A culture of motivation and agility
  • Relationships of trust both inside and outside of the organization

In short, as IT leaders we need to transform our roles and our departments. But, what can we use to pull off this transformation? In this workshop, we focus on, teach and practice the tools of transformational leadership.

Part one of the training dives deep into the Purpose Alignment and Business Value Models. These tools are proven and can be put to use immediately. Part two of the training covers tools leaders use to re-define their roles using the Trust / Ownership Model including agile principles.

All of these tools are concrete, pragmatic, and usable. After each part of the training, participants are ready to use the tools to re-define their roles and deliver what their organizations need – brilliant leadership.

Learning Outcome

Pragmatic tools to help transform an organization

Pragmatic tools to help develop as an agile leader

 

Target Audience

Anyone aspiring to be a leader

schedule Submitted 3 months ago

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  • Woody Zuill
    Woody Zuill
    Todd Little
    Todd Little
    schedule 3 months ago
    Sold Out!
    480 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Let’s explore the purpose and use of estimates in the management of software development efforts, and consider possible alternatives. Why do we estimate and are we making estimates that are actually useful?  We say we depend on estimates to make important decisions, and yet we’re often disappointed by the results.

    Why are we so challenged at estimation?  Are estimates for cost, time, or effort always needed? Is it possible there are other ways to approach our work?  If we didn’t estimate, how could we still be successful at making businesses successful?

    The default use of an "estimate-driven" approach is pervasive in software development efforts, and while estimates can be useful, it is worthwhile to scrutinize our use of estimates for cost, time, and effort, and to seek better ways to manage software development projects.

    There are a number of things to explore and many questions to ask. For example, do we really need estimates for all the things we are currently using them? Are we getting a reasonable benefit from them? Is it possible to manage software development projects without these estimates, or at least with fewer estimates?  Is there a way to prove that estimates are helping us make good decisions?

    In this session we’ll participate in some interactive information gathering exercises to see if we can gain a shared idea of our current understanding of the purpose and use of estimates.  We will examine the nature of software development projects and explore some real data to shed light on the art and science of software estimation.  Our exploration goal is to see if we can work together to come up with some ideas about improving on the traditional approaches to using estimates.