Collaborative Daily Scrum : A Collaborative Alternate to 3 Questions Based Daily Scrum

The 3 questions based Daily Scrum is the defecto way of doing Daily Scrum across teams. For years people have been finding it inadequate as it tends to focus on individuals rather than team and sprint goal, promotes status update kind of discussion rather than collaborative sync-up and becomes an accomplice in promoting zombie Scrum.

The 3 questions based Daily Scrum, unfortunately, doesn’t require collaboration as a mandatory prerequisite. Without mandatory collaboration, no team becomes self-organized as the Development Team continue to be dependent on someone like Scrum Master to organize them as a team.

In 2017 update of Scrum guide, because of all these reasons, 3 questions based Daily Scrum became one of the many Daily Scrum implementations.

However in the absence of any better alternate, people continue to use 3 questions based Daily Scrum.

This alternate implementation of the Daily Scrum, called Collaborative Daily Scrum considers collaboration (pair programming, swarming or mob programming) as the mandatory aspect of the Daily Scrum. The focus is on sprint goal and working as a team and not on individual updates anymore. At any point of time, the team plans to finish at most 2-3 stories collaboratively which helps in automatically limiting the WIP on the Scrum Board.

This implementation has been well received which was published through an AgileBuddha blog post. The post includes the inputs from James Coplien (inventor of daily standup).

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Talk

-- The Scrum origin and its association with 'The New New Product Development Game' paper by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka

-- Rugby Scrum and collaboration - "Working solo or without collaboration (read pair programming, swarming or mob-programming) is not even a choice in Scrum."

-- Problems with 3 questions based daily Scrum

-- Other Daily Scrum alternate - Walk the Wall

-- Collaborative Daily Scrum - the alternative focused towards collaboration and its mechanics

Learning Outcome

* Why zombie Daily Scrum happens?

* Why working solo is not even a choice in Scrum

* Problems with 3 questions based Daily Scrum which attack the Agile mindset

* Daily Scrum in a more collaborative way and its mechanics

* How to use it to limit WIP in Scrum

Target Audience

Scrum Team, Scrum Master, Agile Coache

Prerequisites for Attendees

None

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

  • Talia Lancaster
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    Talia Lancaster / Angie Doyle - T-minus 10… 9… 8… We have lift-off!

    90 Mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Getting new teams to work together is hard. Really. Hard.

    Is it because there is so much hype around new Agile teams? Or is it because there is such a focus on “doing things right” (or “doing” Agile right), that we forget about the people actually doing the work? Regardless of the reason, before we can change the way people work... we need to focus on the things that are important for teamwork to work!

    We believe that the key to high-performance teams is creating an intentional culture that respects and embraces diversity - whether it be race, gender, class, culture, age, beliefs, language, skills or background. So join us as we explore the Team Canvas – sort of like a Business Model Canvas for teamwork - covering nine essential teamwork elements:

    • Purpose - Why we are doing what we are doing?
    • People & Roles - What are our names, roles and responsibilities?
    • Common goals - What do we as a group want to achieve together?
    • Personal goals - What do I as an individual want to achieve?
    • Team values - What do we really stand for and believe in?
    • Needs and expectations - What do each of us need to be successful in a diverse team?
    • Rules & Activities - How do we communicate and keep everyone up to date?
    • Strengths & Assets - What skills do we have in the team?
    • Weaknesses & Risks - What are the weaknesses we have, as an individual and as a team?

    We will walk through our agenda for team lift-offs, facilitation posters and preparation work required, materials needed, and facilitation tips and tricks. All packaged in a handy pocket guide, that you can use to explore tried and tested techniques for each essential element. We will also have an opportunity to practice some of these techniques during the session.

    Get ready to lift-off your team in T-minus 10... 9... 8...

  • Fernando Guigou
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    Fernando Guigou - Collaborative Boards

    Fernando Guigou
    Fernando Guigou
    Lean Coach
    Synchronit
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Executive
    While high performance teams collaborate, make decisions based on evidence and pursue major goals, very often management is still based on hierarchies, competition and self-interest.
    Collaborative Boards is an approach to help organizations to steer autonomous teams through Lean Leadership and mutual help.
    Have you ever wonder, how can organizations steer a myriad of high performant teams? Keeping them aligned while preserving autonomy, engagement and performance is a delicate balance.
    Collaborative Boards are based on Lean principles, Toyota Kata and the experience of practical implementations performed in Munich and Zurich.
    You will learn how to align squads, tribes and a whole organization without the need to depend on individual abilities or soft-skills. Through Collaborative Boards teams can communicate, align goals, get support and thrive.
    To get a feeling about the content and underlying principles, the third video of the series is a good starting point: https://goo.gl/6Zdi7S
  • 20 Mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Evolving an organization to use more agile techniques often means re-evaluating the role of dedicated QA teams common in waterfall development processes. In software organizations that develop a large platform with a group of agile development teams, there is still a need to ensure quality at a product and platform level. As one solution to this, this talk introduces the idea of Platform QA, a dedicated team of QA specialists with responsibility to the entire product, and the platform that delivers it. Platform QA is a feature team that works on a backlog of quality risks and has ultimate ownership of shared artifacts such as end to end (BDD) tests and QA environments. This talk discusses differences between waterfall QA, platform QA and embedded QA, examples shared from my own experience, and conditions where this solution may make sense as a transitional or target organizational structure.

  • David Laribee
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    David Laribee - Welcome to the DevOps Dojo

    David Laribee
    David Laribee
    CEO
    Nerd/Noir
    schedule 2 years ago
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    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Beginner

    In 2016 I had the good fortune to join a massive DevOps initiative as a head coach. The goal was to, in a 7000+ person technology organization, get product development teams fluent in topics such as CI/CD, automated testing, and product management. Over the course of six months our team tuned an initiative a successful, impactful program.

    In this talk, I’ll share the experiences and learnings from my 6-month journey. We’ll start with the concept of a DevOps Dojo and explore it from four perspectives: product, place, process, and, most importantly, people.

    Product: Elaborating on the classic “coder’s dojo” - where the focus is on building technical skills - to a “DevOps Dojo” where we perfect technical skills while delivering on product learning goals.

    Place: We’ll go on a virtual tour through of a massive engineering space designed to promote collaboration, learning, and rapid product feedback.

    Process: How we managed to scale the program to 12 concurrent dojo teams of 4-16 people with a custom pull system (kanban) featuring unusual-but-realistic WIP limits.

    People: What skills (some quite surprising) does it take to make a program like this succeed? I’ll share the framing tool we developed for rapid team alignment during onboarding.

  • ShriKant Vashishtha
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    ShriKant Vashishtha - Watch-out for Agile Transformations with Waterfall Mindset

    ShriKant Vashishtha
    ShriKant Vashishtha
    Agile Coach
    Malonus
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    This session helps in understanding problems when teams move towards Agile but leadership is still stuck with waterfall mindset. It also helps in understanding why Agile transformations fail.

    Even after making transformation efforts for multiple years, in many enterprises, people start doing Agile "process" eventually. But the whole setup, organisational culture, hierarchy, siloed mindset, delays across departments remain same. Even after spending millions, the benefits remain negligible. The enterprise doesn't become agile enough in coming out with innovation and anticipating disruptive changes in the market

  • Dov TSAL
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    Dov TSAL / Regis SCHNEIDER - Wake up your meeting culture

    45 Mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    Meetings are all about Individuals and interactions, would you say they are agile?

    Sadly, most people say theirs are not...

    In this session you will learn why most attempts to hack meeting culture fail, and what you can do to hack your meeting culture, overcome resistance, and use your meetings as a source to wake up your company culture.

    Dov and Regis, the creators of the #MeetingSpicer, a coaching tool to painlessly hack meeting culture, will share with you the tool, and walk you thru some surprising tips to make your meetings come alive.

  • ShriKant Vashishtha
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    ShriKant Vashishtha - Passion Driven Work – Secret Sauce of Generating Exponential Value in a Company

    ShriKant Vashishtha
    ShriKant Vashishtha
    Agile Coach
    Malonus
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Case Study
    Intermediate

    This is a story of a small IT service company in India with a capacity of 80-100 people.I worked there in senior leadership role. The key USP of the company was its focus on technology innovation, thought-leadership, have great technology talents and flat hierarchy. It was an IT service company and was implementing XP, Scrum, CI/CD, Distributed Agile practices since 2006 to its core.

    The company environment was very open. Employees were encouraged to consider organisation like a clean slate. They could write on it whatever they want as long as it brings improvement in status quo and a group of colleagues are convinced about the idea.

    If anybody felt uncomfortable the way things are working in the organization, she could initiate a discussion in the company around the change and if idea makes sense, it gets implemented.

    Considering all mentioned above, it was not a surprise anymore to see a big focus on the following mantra in the company.

    Scratch your own itch. If it’s itching you hard, fix it.

    Essentially people were encouraged to come up with solutions and actions to execute, instead of just listing problems. Everybody in the company was considered an equal partner in improving things.

    The result was – anybody could start any initiative, which he/she thinks to be beneficial for the organization. Senior management helped in shaping up the ideas. However people themselves had to sell their ideas to fellow colleagues and garner support.

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    Initially everything worked as expected. However after few months or so, to my surprise, steam began to die down. Many people backed out when it came to do some work, though they expressed their keen interest initially.

    Another important fact was – only few selected people were participating in most of the activities. Just 5-10 out of 70-80 people was not an encouraging number. Again this is what I saw in many other organizations.

    Rest of the story is about the turn-around of the company when we started aligning people's passions and interests towards the long-term organizational goals. After some time we started getting sustainable and dramatic results.

    At one point, people writing on corporate technical blog were around 5–10% of total number of people. That changed to around 50–60% people in the organization.

    Initially that happened because of the interest shown by truly interested people about it and then because of healthy competition among the colleagues.

    We started finding the involvement of people in various activities like hiring improvement initiative, building technology guilds, multimedia and marketing, software design competition, organizing events, innovation and speaking in conferences.

    This whole system evolved in a well-oiled engine which was ready to take any technological challenge from any client. It obviously improved employee morale. With the word of mouth and good feedback, we started getting great employee references.