Self Organizing Teams – Everlasting challenge for Scrum Master

I genuinely believe that teams are the backbone of any organization. Team and teamwork are the heart and soul of every project and company. We all worked with great teams and loved that feeling of achievement, camaraderie and respect. We all also been a part of a team that was hugely dysfunctional where every day felt just wrong and underwhelming. Forming and empowering small teams within Scrum or Kanban processes allows an organisation to solves complex problems faced by them in constantly changing and challenging word. The Agile Manifesto also states that self-organizing teams can deliver the "best architectures, requirements, and designs."

In today’s turbulent markets, where technology is improving on a daily basis, and teams are shaping innovation into reality, there is an immense need for self-organizing teams. Teams that can thrive within that environment, embrace complexity and unknown future. Our processes are strongly focused on our teams, giving them the best chance to succeed, stay stable, having all the necessary skills and abilities and being cross-functional in the organisation.

This talk takes our efforts for great teams to next level considering what it means to be "self-organising" and what it really means for your team. This change has to be in coordination with the team itself, scrum master and management, which also is covered in this session.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Talk

  • How we currently understand Self Organizing teams
  • Key dimensions of our real-time practices where we created a good set of boundaries within which self-organization can take place

Learning Outcome

Takeaways from our practices for Improved performance as a real-time outcome

Target Audience

Delivery Manager, Scrum Master

schedule Submitted 9 months ago

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