Fun! Done! Learn! - a positive retrospective born in Japan, is this work in your culture?

In this talk, the speaker will present a brand new retrospective format quickly becoming popular in Japan. This method is heavily influenced by Japanese culture, but it may work great in other cultural contexts. We are looking for your feedback.

Someone said Agile is not work in Asian Culture ( https://www.infoq.com/news/2016/06/agile-asia/ ).
One of the difficulties is from retrospectives.

We found a positive retrospective format better fit for our culture: Fun! Done! Learn!
After we published the method in a blog in Japanese, many teams in Japan started using the method. We've not taught or facilitated directly; people just accepted and started using it.
We'd like to share the method as well as how the teams accepted the technique in Japan.
We are eager to hear from you whether this works for your team or not and why.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Talk

1. Agile is not work in Asian Culture?
Someone said Agile is not work in Asian Culture ( https://www.infoq.com/news/2016/06/agile-asia/ ).
One of the difficulties is from retrospectives.

2. Retrospectives often go to negative in Japan
People in Japan prefer Hansei (reflection by oneself) and Kaizen (improvement).
Parents and teachers have trained kids to do the same.
This has caused severe side-effects.
Since some many teacher and parents consider explanations as excuses, there lack the phycological safety.

In Japan, the KPT(Keep Problem Try) retrospective format is common.
This format was originally taught by Alistair Cockburn, in early 2000.
Keep is activities to continue, Problem is what we want to stop, Try is an idea to do some experiences.

Many teams have been using KPT.
The common issue is that people just collect too many Problems and generate too many Try's and leave them all without actually trying anything.
Problems are left unsolved.
Then the teams get bored and start to hate Retrospectives.
Many even stop doing retrospectives completely.
We thought this is from our cultural background; people commonly were forced to do Hansei and Kaizen from their childhood.
In spite of training and facilitation, the team usually had a hard time to share their Keep.

3. Positive Retrospective
In 2019, Japanese Agile coaches have Scrum Coaching Retreat. In the retreat, we've created a new way of a retrospective better fit for our culture.
We call the new format: Fun! Done! Learn!
Overall, the format focuses on the positive side.
- What fun did you have?
- What have you done/delivered?
- What have you learned?

4. Spread out very fast in Japan
After we published the method in a blog in Japanese, many teams in Japan started using the method. We've not taught or facilitated directly; people just accepted and started using it.
We'd like to share the method as well as how the teams accepted the technique in Japan.
We are eager to hear from you whether this works for your team or not and why.

5. A background of Positive Retrospectives
We have a Fun/Done!/Learn! Introduction workshop available. We have learned a lot from
Linda Rising and Jeff Patton about lead great workshops in Agile 2010.
Agile Retrospectives - a Rising Patton Fusion
http://winnipegagilist.blogspot.com/2010/11/agile-retrospectives-rising-patton.html

Learning Outcome

Attendees will understand
- Some asian countries have cultural disturbance to Agile
- New retrospective format : Fun! Done! Learn!
- Why did we make it
- How it works

Target Audience

Scrum Master, Agile practitioners

Prerequisites for Attendees

Nothing

schedule Submitted 4 weeks ago

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