The principles of chaos engineering have been battle-tested for years using traditional infrastructure and containerized microservices, but how do they work with serverless functions and managed services? In this session we'll cover the motivations behind chaos engineering, how we perform chaos experiments, what some of the common weaknesses we can test for in our serverless applications are and run some actual experiments in a serverless environment. Join as we move from talking about principles to performing real chaos engineering experiments for serverless!

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Talk

  • Set the stage about what resilience is.
  • What is chaos engineering?
  • The motivations behind chaos engineering, why we do it and what we gain by doing it.
  • How we perform chaos experiments.
  • What differs when doing chaos engineering for serverless.
  • What some of the common weaknesses we can test for in our serverless applications are and how we can find those using chaos experiments.
  • Demonstration of actual chaos experiments in a serverless environment.

Learning Outcome

The audience learn what chaos engineering is, how it can help us build more resilient applications, what is different when doing chaos engineering for serverless and how to get started doing chaos experiments.

Target Audience

Developers, architects, SREs

schedule Submitted 1 month ago

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