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    How to Stop Hating your Tests

    Justin Searls
    Justin Searls
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Your app is a unique snowflake. Your tests are too… but they shouldn't be!

    You know the person on every project team who cares just a little bit more about testing than everyone else? This talk is a distillation of the lessons learned I've learned from being that guy on dozens of projects.

    This is a rapid-fire session that covers 15 systemic problems that plague most teams' test suites, presented form an angle you probably haven't considered before. Best of all, it'll equip you with preventative measures to avoid or mitigate each of them.

  • Gerard Meszaros
    Gerard Meszaros
    schedule 9 months ago
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    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    Automated unit testing is commonly considered an essential part of writing reliable, bug-free software. But writing automated tests introduces a number of challenges of its own. Naively-written tests are complex, brittle and hard to understand. This increases their cost-of-ownership and reduces the value they provide.

    In this talk, Gerard Meszaros examines some of the key pitfalls and shows us how to improve the quality of our automated tests. He shows us how we can make our tests shorter, clearer and cheaper to prepare by refactoring a long, complex test into a short easy-to-understand test. Then he goes on to show how we can apply the same concepts to writing new tests quickly and cheaply.

  • Arlo Belshee
    Arlo Belshee
    schedule 10 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Most people see bugs as a fact of life in software development. Just like city-wide fires used to be taken as a fact of life in urban living. The key to no longer burning cities to the ground was fire prevention, not improved fire fighting. I've applied similar thinking with dozens of teams and shifted to a world in which bugs occur at the same frequency as city-wide fires.
    Let's imagine this world for a moment. These teams don't have:

    • a bug database. They just use a section of the whiteboard.
    • lots of testers.
    • large suites of automated tests. Lots of their code is untested and known bug-free (yes, that is possible).
    • bug triage meetings.
    • large customer support teams or devs handling escalations.
    • problems in operations or large ops teams.
    • story "done-done" criteria or delays in shipping.
    • complex trade-offs in prioritizing stories against each other.
    • lost revenue due to market embarrassment.

    It turns out that most software development activities arise from one source: bugs. They are failure demand, and thus 100% waste. Teams that stop writing bugs get to stop doing these rituals. They spend a lot more time on value delivery and reduce costs across the organization.
    In this talk, I'll show how these teams have stopped writing bugs. We'll discuss the source of bugs and I'll show you how to code differently so that bugs just...don't happen.

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