Sociocracy – A means for true agile organizations

schedule 10:35 AM - 11:20 AM place Legends II

Sociocracy is a way for groups and organizations to self-organize. Based on four principles only (self-organizing teams, shared decision making based on consent, double-linking, and electing people to functions and tasks), sociocracy provides a path for existing organizations toward empowerment and self-responsibility on all levels. It enables managers to become agile leaders. Different to comparable models, sociocracy allows companies to start where they are – with their existing organizational structures and the like. It seems to be a perfect fit for organizations which are in the need to be agile truly (due to market pressure), beyond their IT departments and software teams.

Moreover, on the team level - sociocracy provides a means for the Scrum Master and/or coach to enable self-organization.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Origin
  2. Decision Making
  3. Roles & Hierarchies
  4. Summary

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the four principles of sociocracy
  • Learn how agile and sociocracy relate
  • Understand how you can apply it

Target Audience

Top Management, Middle Management, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, (Project) Managers, Junior Executives, Coaches, Consultants, and Change Agents

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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comment Comment on this Proposal
  • Naresh Jain
    By Naresh Jain  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Thanks Jutta. I like the proposal. However 90 mins might be difficult to fit in the program. Would you be open to turning this into a 45 mins talk where you can walk thru the concept with a real-world example? If yes, can you please update your proposal accordingly.

    • Jutta Eckstein
      By Jutta Eckstein  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks Naresh, not sure if you've seen that I've updated the proposal (almost right away after having received your feedback). Please let me know if you think it needs some more updating..

      Cheers,

      Jutta

      • Naresh Jain
        By Naresh Jain  ~  1 year ago
        reply Reply

        Awesome! Thanks.


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