schedule Oct 6th 12:25 PM - 01:10 PM place Legends III

Agile meetings do not always go smoothly. Especially when you work in a geographically distributed team or get moved from one team to another. How can you discover what might be going on when things go awry? This session will have a brief simulation of a meeting. Three volunteers will play agile roles with typical challenges we experience. As a group we will share observations about the interactions, and what we thought we understood, but may not have. This session introduces the Satir Interaction Model and a broader understanding of how we might correct mis-interpreted behavior and commenting. 

 

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Introduction of Satir Interaction Model and its basis. (Handouts provided)

Brief simulation of an agile meeting w/ volunteers and assigned roles.

Debrief with observations and discoveries.

A flipchart or white board, if possible

 

Learning Outcome

People discover how their assumptions may reflect only their perspective.

The interaction model provides an awareness of the internal process that everyone goes through.

A respect for human complexity that can help us get to resolutions.

 

Target Audience

Anyone

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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