• Camille Bell
    Camille Bell
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    You probably started your Agile journey with Scrum, which helped. But regression testing still takes forever. New feature tests aren't what they could be and are hard to complete within the Sprint.

    If you have active product owners, the POs helped to improve your product, but there is still a disconnect, between the user story and the tests.  And how do you test "as a, I want, so that"?

    Now you hear you need Agile technical practices to keep improving and you find you need to automate. What are you going to do with your testers?  They really, really know your business, but they don't code.

    If you are a manager, a tester or a product owner, come hear Camille as she shares her experience successfully teaching manual testers Automated Test Driven Development and showing product owners how to write great Acceptance Criteria that are easy to automate.

    In this session you will learn:

    • How to get your product owners, testers and developers to understand each other
    • How to make your business scenarios unambiguous and testable
    • How to avoid brittle tests that need frequent rewriting
    • Which tools and languages are better for testers to learn and why
    • Strategies and techniques for testers to learn test automation
    • Where to find inexpensive and free resources to get started
  • Martin Folkoff
    Martin Folkoff
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    “Running a football team is no different than running any other kind of organization…” -- Vince Lombardi

    Large enterprise scale software development is a team sport. In order to win in this game your software needs to be of the highest quality, which is almost impossible to achieve with testers on the sidelines. To build a winning a team you need the right players, but great teams don't always need the best players. Great teams win because they find ways to let the individuals on their team be great. 

    The wave of DevOps in the industry is in a broader sense an effort to let developers and system engineers do what they do best by eliminating or simplifying tasks that forced individuals into activities beyond their expertise. Pre-DevOps roles were like trying to ask Payton Manning to play both quarterback and running back at the same time. DevOps is the manifestation of empathy between two distinct sets of skills allowing the other to focus on what their best at. What about testers? How can the team expand their empathy to their role? What can the developers, program managers, and others do to let testers be great? Please join me if your curious to hear about the practices, tools, and culture that can make your software a winner with quality.

     

     

     

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