• Liked Thomas M Cagley Jr
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    Budgeting, Estimation, Planning, #NoEstimates and the Agile Planning Onion - They ALL make sense!

    Thomas M Cagley Jr
    Thomas M Cagley Jr
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    There are many levels of estimation, including budgeting, high-level estimation and task planning (detailed estimation).  We can link a more classic view of estimation to  the Agile planning onion popularized by Mike Cohn.   In the Agile planning onion, strategic planning is on the outside of the onion and the planning that occurs in the daily sprint meetings is at the core of the onion. Each layer closer to the core relates more to the day-to-day activity of a team. The #NoEstimates movement eschew developing story- or task-level estimates and sometimes higher levels of estimation. As you get closer to the core of the planning onion the case for the#NoEstimates becomes more compelling and dare I say useful. 

    This presentation focuses on challenging the attendee to consider estimation as a form of planning. Planning is a considered an important competency in most business environments. Planning activities abound whether planning the corporate picnic to planning the acquisition and implementation of a new customer relationship management system. Most planning activities center on answering a few very basic questions. When will “it” be done? How much will “it” cost? What is “it” that I will actually get? As an organization or team progresses through the planning onion, the need for effort and cost estimation lessens in most cases. #NoEstimation does not remove the need for all types of estimates. Most organizations will always need to estimate in order to budget. Organizations that have stable teams, adopt the Agile mindset and have a well-groomed backlog will be able to use predictable flow to forecast rather than effort and cost estimation. At a sprint or day-to-day level Agile teams that predictably deliver value can embrace the idea of #NoEstimate while answering the basic questions based what, when and how much based on performance.

  • Liked Richard Cheng
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    Situational Retrospectives – One size does not fit all

    Richard Cheng
    Richard Cheng
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

     

    Situation A: Your team is great. You’ve met all your sprint goals and your Product Owner is pleased with the results to date. Yeah!

     

    Situation B: Your team sucked. Zero story points completed last sprint. Team members are complaining and blaming each other for the failures.

     

    These two situations demand two very different retrospectives. The right retrospective can make a good team great and turn a bad situation into a learning opportunity. A bad retrospective can set a team back and create a non-safe working environment.

     

    In this session, attendees will explorer retrospectives techniques and examine the pros and cons of the techniques. The workshop will then explore scenarios and examine how to effectively run retrospectives across a variety of scenarios.

     

    Coming out of this sessions, attendees will have an understanding of applying the right retrospectives based on the state and needs of the team and projects.

     

  • Liked Simon Storm
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    Don't just do Agile. Do Agile right.

    Simon Storm
    Simon Storm
    Mary Lynn Wilhite
    Mary Lynn Wilhite
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you struggling to implement Agile at your company?  What could be better than to learn from someone who has done it wrong over and over! We want to share our experiences pioneering Agile at a FinTech company.  After multiple attempts and through sheer stubbornness, we were we able to get it right and improve our release pace by 650% annually.  We will walk through where we went wrong, what we did right, and why we now understand that Agile cannot be successful without profound collaboration, Continuous Delivery, a DevOps culture and a desire to continuously improve.

  • Liked Amber King
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    Make The Right Changes & Make Changes Right Through Process Co-creation

    Amber King
    Amber King
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    In the agile community, we celebrate failure as well as success. On our journey to plan @ scale, the Agile Program Management team at Opower had a lot of early failures, but then we started succeeding. How? By not only listening to our stakeholders, but co-creating solutions with them. In this talk, I focus on how process co-creation is helping Opower scale. I’ll describe a specific case study, then we’ll try co-creation together. By the end of this talk, you’ll have specific tips and techniques on how to successfully co-create solutions with your teams that you can take back and use with them tomorrow.

  • Liked Matthieu Cornillon
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    The Myth of Fixed Scope: Why Goals Matter

    Matthieu Cornillon
    Matthieu Cornillon
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    How many times have you heard someone say that scope is fixed and then throw a tantrum when they hear how long it will take to build?  How many times have you seen the spirited creativity of development teams evaporate when a stakeholder tells them the deliverable cannot be changed at all?  And how many times have you discussed agility with naysayers who say, "That's all fine in an ideal world when you are building some hip little application, but we're in the real world with real projects with fixed scope."

    This presentation explores the myth of fixed scope, how damaging the notion is, and the tool we all have at our disposal for escaping the trap.  Come explore how natural it is to use it, and yet how vigilant we need to be to keep ourselves from casting it aside.

     

  • Liked Cindy Bloomer
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    Influencing Organization Change – a Framework for Thinking about and Designing Change Initiatives

    Cindy Bloomer
    Cindy Bloomer
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Studies over the last two decades have shown change initiatives have a high rate of failure to meet expected outcomes, yet traditional change management approaches continue to apply a sequential, step-by-step process in constantly changing environments.   An underlying assumption for these approaches seems to be that the desired end-state is assured, as long as the steps are followed.

    Successful change initiatives in today’s environment will view the “wicked problem” of complex change through an empirical framework based on proven concepts from Organization Development (OD), augmented with tools and techniques from additional disciplines such as Lean, Agile, and Human Systems Dynamics (HSD) to influence changes in thinking and behaving.

    This interactive session includes:

    • Overview of the OD approach to organization change
    • Introduction of a Change Spectrum for visualizing organization change
    • Introduction of an Empirical Framework for designing and implementing change initiatives
    • Introduction and Overview of a few specific diagnostic models from OD, Human Systems Dynamics, and Integral Agile
    • Overview and discussion of a few specific tools and techniques that help shift thinking and behavior

     

  • Liked Theresa Smith
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    Product Design with Intent: How to Drive Product Design in an Agile Project

    Theresa Smith
    Theresa Smith
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    When design is based on random choices, the end product is an assembly of random elements that have little or nothing in common. But when design forces all elements to work together then it makes a single, powerful, and meaningful impression to the user. While agile can get the job done faster, it doesn’t help guide design choices for a software product.    

    This session presents a design driven approach called Strong Center Design that incorporates design into an agile workflow.

    If you have an interest in improving design of your software products, then this is the session for you.

  • Liked Marsha Acker
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    Diagnosing and Changing Stuck Patterns in Teams

    Marsha Acker
    Marsha Acker
    schedule 1 year ago
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    120 mins
    Workshop
    Advanced

    Do you want to be able to “trust the wisdom of the group” but find it difficult? Do you ever feel like you’re having the same conversation over and over again with no real progress? Do you ever feel like you are stuck in a disagreement and not sure how to move forward?

    If any of these issues are standing in the way of your work with groups and teams ‐ ‘how’ you are having (or not having) the conversation is likely contributing to your challenges. Research consistently demonstrates that team effectiveness is highly dependent upon the quality of the communication between team members. Yet it’s easy to get into the flow of daily work and be really focused on the ‘what’ in our conversations without much attention to the quality of ‘how’ we’re communicating.

    As an agile coach one of the most important ways you can serve your team is to help them unlock the wisdom that exists within the team itself and have the conversations they need to have. We’ll explore a framework for learning to ‘read the room’ using four elements for all face-to-face communication. We’ll do some live practice to apply the framework to a conversation and then identify some typical patterns of “stuck” communications that can lead to “breakdowns” in teams.

    This will be an interactive session with people actively engaged in both large group and small group discussions.

  • Tommie Adams Jr.
    Tommie Adams Jr.
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The Zombie Retrospective - presented by Tommie Adams 

    So they say the retrospective is one of the strongest and most powerful tools in the agile scrum methodology tool kit, and is often overlooked or skipped. So how does a scrum master find ways to creatively explain and express the importance of this agile scrum ceremony, or even the basics of agile scrum in general. How does the scrum master explain the importance of banding together as a team in this brave new agile scrum world.  In many organizations, nowadays, the teams are even made up of outside vendors as well as in house associates. So how do you even start to pique the interest and the importance of team collaboration to a bunch of folks who are strangers to one another on a agile scrum team?  Even more specifically, how do you explain how the retrospective ceremony will help improve the way they work with one another over time?

    My answer: ZOMBIES!!!  Everyone loves zombies, right?  So come, take a bite!

    Tommie works for Marriott International in Bethesda MD. His background is in theater and communication which he studied at Grinnell College in Iowa. He has worked for Marriott International for 26 years with jobs ranging from reservation sales associate, to group sales manager, to functional IT tester to his current position as scrum master for the Marriott Rewards Agile Scrum Team. A native of Omaha, Nebraska, his hobbies include photography, cello and learning the ukulele, (you know, in case you were curious.) 

  • Liked toddcharron
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    Improv Your Agile or Scrum Stand-up

    toddcharron
    toddcharron
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Your Agile Stand-up Meeting Sucks!

     

    Most Agile and Scrum stand-up meetings I see are boring, lifeless, status meetings that don't provide any real value.

     

    In this session you'll learn:

     

    The REAL purpose of the daily stand-up

    The most common bad habits and how to correct them

    The habits good stand-up meetings have

    How you can use Improv to invigorate your daily stand-up

    A whole bunch of Improv exercises you can start using with your team right now!

  • Darren Hoevel
    Darren Hoevel
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate
    Abstract:

    This presentation was initial created for an executive leadership team being pressure into the practices of Agile. The Organization soon found their to be a huge gap in the understanding of organizational agility, of not only agile, but the conceptual models needed to drive speed, innovation, and creativity. This session will provide a view into an integral view to change. In 45 minutes I will not be able to cover all of the details in every model, however I plan to present these models in such a way that they the audience will understand what resources are at their disposal to leverage when needed and expand their perspective.

  • Liked Donald Patti
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    Leaning Up: Eliminating the Seven Wastes in your Agile Shop

    Donald Patti
    Donald Patti
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner
    When many of us hear "Lean" we think of Kanban, but it's clearly more than that.  In this session, I'll go beyond the Kanban and explore Lean's seven wastes, defining each one and providing concrete examples.  Then, we'll conduct a "Lean Up" activity to help you ferret out wastes that you can take back and apply in your own Agile shop.
     
  • Liked Kate Seavey
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    The Dark Side: Using Dark Stories to Help Product Owners Prioritize Mundane Maintenance

    Kate Seavey
    Kate Seavey
    Sheya Meierdierks-Lehman
    Sheya Meierdierks-Lehman
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Delivery teams know from experience the importance of maintenance such as applying patches, upgrading, and conforming to the latest security and accessibility regulations. Product Owners, other value team members, and system stakeholders are focused on functionality and end user satisfaction. Maintenance isn’t sexy and can sink in priority until it fails to be included in releases.

     

    The Security community has been using Dark/Abuser/Evil Stories using the persona of a Black Hat Hacker to uncover vulnerabilities. In this workshop participants will assume the role of Delivery Team members and use the power of personas to write “Dark Stories” that bring to life the full impact of failing to perform necessary maintenance.  The intent is to give Product Owners a complete understanding of the importance of maintenance so they can appropriately prioritize maintenance and keep their systems strong.

  • Liked Dave Nicolette
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    Shit Agile Coaches Say

    Dave Nicolette
    Dave Nicolette
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    "Language does not just describe reality. Language creates the reality it describes." - Desmond Tutu

    The agile community has evolved into a group of highly enthusiastic proponents who bring a high level of excitement to everything they say and do. Agilists speak a strange sort of insider jargon in which plain English words have very unusual, and often counterintuitive meanings.

    They may describe your multi-billion-dollar enterprise as "dysfunctional" and on the verge of "failure." They may suggest your teams "sprint" to get work done, and yet do so at a "sustainable pace." They may tell your management that agile helps teams "go faster" while assuring your teams that agile isn't about "going faster." They may insist that agile is more about culture and mindset than about practices, and then measure your progress in terms of how faithfully you follow a prescribed set of practices.

    There are many more examples of this odd insider jargon, starting with the seminal buzzword itself, "agile." Over the years, the way agilists speak has confused and turned off many who might otherwise have benefited from applying agile values and principles. The presenter will share several stories of the unintended effects of agile-speak, and will invite you to share your own tales of woe and amusement.

     

  • Liked Jason Hall
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    Expanding Beyond Agile. Unlearning Old Lessons on our Journey to Teal

    Jason Hall
    Jason Hall
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Teal is a natural extension of the Agile mindset, but who would have thought flattening the hierarchy could be this difficult! If Agile removes impediments and empowers teams to deliver more frequently and more valuable offerings, teal removes organizational impediments (hierarchy built on lack of trust ) and fosters empowerment by localizing decision making, re-centering activities around an evolutionary purpose, and aligning the personal with the organizational (wholeness). But what actually happens when you put rubber to road and empower teams to recruit, hire, fire, and determine each other’s bonuses? Well, things get a little messy. If you’re patient, set aside short-term outcomes, and look to long-term gain, it can prove deeply rewarding. I’ll take you on our own evolutionary journey from green to teal and share with you lessons learned along the way.

    If you’re curious about alternative management styles or interested in the next extension of Agile, then come sit, chat, and reflect.

  • Liked Bob Cameron
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    Agile Release Planning: Building on SAFe and OST

    Bob Cameron
    Bob Cameron
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    One goal of release planning is to ensure dependencies among teams are identified, common issues are addressed and people are committed within teams and among teams.

     One team using Scrum release planning consists of keeping a prioritized backlog, tracking the team velocity.  When up to 3 or 4 teams are working on related backlogs, comparing and coordinating backlogs are effective.  

     Somewhere around 4 to 5 teams working on related backlogs, a more structured approach such as Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Program Increment (PI) planning provided a structured framework to coordinate among teams.  SAFe PI planning facilitates conversations and coordination across teams.  However, product owners are not necessarily interested in architecture updates.  Also, conversations between two teams may apply to more than two teams if only the other teams.

     Open Space Technology (OST) provides a facilitation framework where participants generate the agenda on the fly.  Generating the agenda with all participants ensures that topics that the meeting organizers were not aware of are discussed among relevant team members.  A public agenda ensures that all interested enough to attend the breakout sessions have a say in the program direction.  Proceedings ensure that all have access to what was discussed, and provide guidance of who to talk to after planning about the subjects with questions.  However, OST by itself does not ensure a release plan will come out of the meeting.

     The best release planning sessions I have held so far combine SAFe PI planning structure with OST.  Combining the techniques was an immediate improvement over using only SAFe PI planning.  The planning session came out with sprint goals, identified dependencies and proceedings from breakout sessions.  This session will point out what has and has not worked so far, identify areas for improvement, and is a call for experiences beyond my own using this technique.

     

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