• Liked Thomas M Cagley Jr
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    Budgeting, Estimation, Planning, #NoEstimates and the Agile Planning Onion - They ALL make sense!

    Thomas M Cagley Jr
    Thomas M Cagley Jr
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    There are many levels of estimation, including budgeting, high-level estimation and task planning (detailed estimation).  We can link a more classic view of estimation to  the Agile planning onion popularized by Mike Cohn.   In the Agile planning onion, strategic planning is on the outside of the onion and the planning that occurs in the daily sprint meetings is at the core of the onion. Each layer closer to the core relates more to the day-to-day activity of a team. The #NoEstimates movement eschew developing story- or task-level estimates and sometimes higher levels of estimation. As you get closer to the core of the planning onion the case for the#NoEstimates becomes more compelling and dare I say useful. 

    This presentation focuses on challenging the attendee to consider estimation as a form of planning. Planning is a considered an important competency in most business environments. Planning activities abound whether planning the corporate picnic to planning the acquisition and implementation of a new customer relationship management system. Most planning activities center on answering a few very basic questions. When will “it” be done? How much will “it” cost? What is “it” that I will actually get? As an organization or team progresses through the planning onion, the need for effort and cost estimation lessens in most cases. #NoEstimation does not remove the need for all types of estimates. Most organizations will always need to estimate in order to budget. Organizations that have stable teams, adopt the Agile mindset and have a well-groomed backlog will be able to use predictable flow to forecast rather than effort and cost estimation. At a sprint or day-to-day level Agile teams that predictably deliver value can embrace the idea of #NoEstimate while answering the basic questions based what, when and how much based on performance.

  • Liked Kate Seavey
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    The Dark Side: Using Dark Stories to Help Product Owners Prioritize Mundane Maintenance

    Kate Seavey
    Kate Seavey
    Sheya Meierdierks-Lehman
    Sheya Meierdierks-Lehman
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Delivery teams know from experience the importance of maintenance such as applying patches, upgrading, and conforming to the latest security and accessibility regulations. Product Owners, other value team members, and system stakeholders are focused on functionality and end user satisfaction. Maintenance isn’t sexy and can sink in priority until it fails to be included in releases.

     

    The Security community has been using Dark/Abuser/Evil Stories using the persona of a Black Hat Hacker to uncover vulnerabilities. In this workshop participants will assume the role of Delivery Team members and use the power of personas to write “Dark Stories” that bring to life the full impact of failing to perform necessary maintenance.  The intent is to give Product Owners a complete understanding of the importance of maintenance so they can appropriately prioritize maintenance and keep their systems strong.

  • Liked Bob Cameron
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    Agile Release Planning: Building on SAFe and OST

    Bob Cameron
    Bob Cameron
    schedule 1 year ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    One goal of release planning is to ensure dependencies among teams are identified, common issues are addressed and people are committed within teams and among teams.

     One team using Scrum release planning consists of keeping a prioritized backlog, tracking the team velocity.  When up to 3 or 4 teams are working on related backlogs, comparing and coordinating backlogs are effective.  

     Somewhere around 4 to 5 teams working on related backlogs, a more structured approach such as Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Program Increment (PI) planning provided a structured framework to coordinate among teams.  SAFe PI planning facilitates conversations and coordination across teams.  However, product owners are not necessarily interested in architecture updates.  Also, conversations between two teams may apply to more than two teams if only the other teams.

     Open Space Technology (OST) provides a facilitation framework where participants generate the agenda on the fly.  Generating the agenda with all participants ensures that topics that the meeting organizers were not aware of are discussed among relevant team members.  A public agenda ensures that all interested enough to attend the breakout sessions have a say in the program direction.  Proceedings ensure that all have access to what was discussed, and provide guidance of who to talk to after planning about the subjects with questions.  However, OST by itself does not ensure a release plan will come out of the meeting.

     The best release planning sessions I have held so far combine SAFe PI planning structure with OST.  Combining the techniques was an immediate improvement over using only SAFe PI planning.  The planning session came out with sprint goals, identified dependencies and proceedings from breakout sessions.  This session will point out what has and has not worked so far, identify areas for improvement, and is a call for experiences beyond my own using this technique.

     

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