DevOps as a buzzword is gaining traction, but what does it really mean? Managers, non-techies, and developers-new-to-devops will get a guided demo of development automation. See all the cool tools in action - continuous integration, automated testing, cloud deployment, etc. More importantly, we'll walk through what they do, and why that adds value to a project. 

This talk will...

  • Break down the buzzwords and define some key technical practices in plain english.
  • Uncover the pain that leads teams to seek greater automation.
  • Demonstrate a continuous integration pipeline working in practice via live demo.
  • Diminish the knowledge gap between technical practitioners and managers/analysts/coaches.
  • Level-up the vocabulary of non-technical attendees.
  • Introduce practices to developers who don't yet work in an automated environment.
  • Spark "ah-ha" moments to convert skeptics into DevOps believers!

By the way, all of the tools in the demo are some combination of free and/or open source. DevOps doesn't have to cost a lot.

 
 

Outline/structure of the Session

  1. The Dark Ages - a world without automation
  2. Pain - what drives teams to seek automation
  3. Beyond Buzzwords - define DevOps and key underlying practices
    • What comes out of the continuous integration pipeline?
    • Isn't Docker a brand of pants?
    • Are dependencies what I put on my tax return?
    • ... and more!
  4. Enough Talk - demo time
    • Fast forward to the end - deploy a change and get the process started - then rewind to the beginning to walk through the process of how we got there
    • Walk through an example application change
    • Show a failing build
    • Show a fixed build / implemented feature, exercising tools:
      • Dependency management (Bower, Bundler, NPM)
      • Scripted database changes (Ruby on Rails/Active Record)
      • Automated testing (Rspec, Capybara, etc.)
      • Continuous Integration (CircleCI)
      • Gated deployments (AWS, Elastic Beanstalk)
  5. DevOps Saves - how DevOps can save your life
  6. Is it Right for Me? - discussion of considerations of why to automate or not 

Note: this will be a mix of live demo and "pre-baked" sections. We can always fall back on the latter if the demo gods are unkind.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand DevOps beyond the buzzwords.
  • Know the benefits and tradeoffs with implementing DevOps practices.
  • Be able to convey the value of development automation to stakeholders.
  • Converse with technical staff with (relative) confidence.

Target Audience

Managers/Analysts/Coaches/Non-techies, or developers who have not worked in a 'DevOps' environment

Requirements

Projector and internet connection.

'Lecture' layout.

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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  • Bob Payne
    By Bob Payne  ~  1 year ago
    reply Reply

    Love live fire demos.  Can you get all of these concepts demoed in that short a period?

    Would like to see some information on timing.

    -Bob Payne

    • Ben Morris
      By Ben Morris  ~  1 year ago
      reply Reply

      Thanks Bob! I'll work on getting some timing info in there. We'll end up with a mix of live demo and some pre-baked steps (at least as a fall back). 


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