“Agile doesn’t have a brain.” This quote from Bill Scott, ‎VP, Business Engineering and Product Development at PayPal, is provocative for sure, but it highlights the perception that in most organizations Agile is primarily applied as a downstream engineering approach. As such, it isn’t inherently concerned with optimizing product design and user experience, the biggest drivers of customer satisfaction. The feedback cycles that form the basis of Scrum provide verification and validation of stakeholder needs only as they are expressed in the backlog’s user stories. Even if a sufficiently empowered and accessible Product Owner is available, agile methods offer little guidance on how to translate organizational goals and customer needs into the backlog’s content and relative priorities in the first place. As a result, the danger persists that agile teams end up very efficiently building products that implement an incomplete and subjective perception of the wants and needs of both the organization and its customers.

In this session, we will explore how Lean thinking expands the “inspect and adapt” loops of agile development and helps systematically determine which features and design choices really provide the greatest organizational value. After a brief introduction to Lean concepts, we will discuss how Lean approaches product development as a series of hypotheses about customers’ behavior and value perception and builds on Agile’s rapid iterative delivery of working software to test these assumptions. Finally, we will examine ways to derive testable assumptions from organizational goals, such as the Lean UX Hypothesis Statement template and Gojko Adzic’s Impact Mapping.

 
8 favorite thumb_down thumb_up 0 comments visibility_off  Remove from Watchlist visibility  Add to Watchlist
 

Outline/structure of the Session

  • Brief introduction to Lean concepts
  • Agile provides little guidance on “the right thing”
  • Using Lean to close the customer value learning loop
  • How to derive testable assumptions from organizational goals
  • Validated learning as an approach to uncertainty
  • Conclusion/takeaways

Learning Outcome

Overall:

The objective of this presentation is to familiarize the audience with concepts of Lean thinking and how these can be used to maximize the business value gained from agile development methodologies.

Specific objectives:

  • Become familiar with the basic concepts of Lean thinking
  • Understand the necessity of agile delivery for business agility
  • Recognize inherent uncertainty and assumptions in determining the "right thing"
  • Understand how validated learning from testable hypotheses can provide crucial feedback about the impact of features on business goals
  • Be introduced to tools and methods that support connecting business goals to features, visualizing hypotheses and maximizing value

Target Audience

Product Owners, Product Managers, Scrum Masters, Project Managers, Business Analysts and anyone else interested in getting the most business value from an agile team.

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal

  • 120 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    As a business analyst on an agile team, do you spend your time gathering decisions from product owners and passing them on to development teams? Are you tired of simply being a “proxy without power?” As a product manager, do you feel like you are just collecting stakeholder opinions and filtering them for the team? What can you do to boost your impact to your team?

    Be more than a proxy.

    By definition, a proxy means doing a thing “by the authority to represent someone else.” That job can be important, especially when stakeholders and customers have limited available. But teams need more.

    In this workshop, Diane Zajac-Woodie demonstrates how you can be more than a proxy. Through some experiential exercises, you will learn what impact collaboration has on results and why requirements are just as important as ever. Diane also teaches you how to document requirements so people will actually read them. Using acceptance tests, you will practice writing requirements that describe the exact behaviors that you expect in a format that everyone understands.

    Be inspired to embrace your role in an agile environment and leave with new techniques that ensure that you will be more than a proxy when you head back to work.

  • Liked David W Kane
    keyboard_arrow_down

    David W Kane - FeatureBan - A simulation to introduce Kanban basics

    45 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    FeatureBan is a simple and quick simulation that introduces several of the key concepts of Kanban, including visualization, feedback loops and limiting work in process and that lets participants learn by doing.  The simulation is also useful because it lets organizations who are curious about Kanban quickly learn about it before investing further.  Mike Burrows invented the simulation, but in this session we will present a modified version that we have used with both technical and non-technical audiences.

  • Liked Richard Cheng
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Richard Cheng - Situational Retrospectives – One size does not fit all

    Richard Cheng
    Richard Cheng
    Principal
    Excella Consulting
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

     

    Situation A: Your team is great. You’ve met all your sprint goals and your Product Owner is pleased with the results to date. Yeah!

     

    Situation B: Your team sucked. Zero story points completed last sprint. Team members are complaining and blaming each other for the failures.

     

    These two situations demand two very different retrospectives. The right retrospective can make a good team great and turn a bad situation into a learning opportunity. A bad retrospective can set a team back and create a non-safe working environment.

     

    In this session, attendees will explorer retrospectives techniques and examine the pros and cons of the techniques. The workshop will then explore scenarios and examine how to effectively run retrospectives across a variety of scenarios.

     

    Coming out of this sessions, attendees will have an understanding of applying the right retrospectives based on the state and needs of the team and projects.

     

  • Liked Amber King
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Amber King - Make The Right Changes & Make Changes Right Through Process Co-creation

    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    In the agile community, we celebrate failure as well as success. On our journey to plan @ scale, the Agile Program Management team at Opower had a lot of early failures, but then we started succeeding. How? By not only listening to our stakeholders, but co-creating solutions with them. In this talk, I focus on how process co-creation is helping Opower scale. I’ll describe a specific case study, then we’ll try co-creation together. By the end of this talk, you’ll have specific tips and techniques on how to successfully co-create solutions with your teams that you can take back and use with them tomorrow.

  • 45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    You probably started your Agile journey with Scrum, which helped. But regression testing still takes forever. New feature tests aren't what they could be and are hard to complete within the Sprint.

    If you have active product owners, the POs helped to improve your product, but there is still a disconnect, between the user story and the tests.  And how do you test "as a, I want, so that"?

    Now you hear you need Agile technical practices to keep improving and you find you need to automate. What are you going to do with your testers?  They really, really know your business, but they don't code.

    If you are a manager, a tester or a product owner, come hear Camille as she shares her experience successfully teaching manual testers Automated Test Driven Development and showing product owners how to write great Acceptance Criteria that are easy to automate.

    In this session you will learn:

    • How to get your product owners, testers and developers to understand each other
    • How to make your business scenarios unambiguous and testable
    • How to avoid brittle tests that need frequent rewriting
    • Which tools and languages are better for testers to learn and why
    • Strategies and techniques for testers to learn test automation
    • Where to find inexpensive and free resources to get started
  • Liked Jason Tice
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Jason Tice - Agile Portfolio Management Metrics to Guide your next Enterprise-wide Road Trip

    Jason Tice
    Jason Tice
    Agile Coach
    Asynchrony
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you overwhelmed and/or confused as to which metrics can reveal insights to make fact-based decisions to properly manage your agile software development portfolio.  Join us for a the story of a journey, where we will use the metaphor of “going on a road trip” to explain and demonstrate simple yet effective metrics for agile portfolio management.  As we go on our road trip, we’ll highlight the importance of defining and then using quantitative “roll-up” metrics to enable leadership to make informed strategic decisions without slowing delivery team activities while at the same time providing a foundation for team self-management and autonomy.  We’ll use the road-trip metaphor to depict the challenges that teams and organizations encounter attempting to manage their portfolio without effective portfolio metrics defined.  Think about what driving on a road trip would be like if your car didn’t have a check-engine light or a gas gauge, sound risky???  The good news is: it doesn’t have to be that way, and believe it or not, if you have measurements at the team level creating actionable portfolio-metrics is easier than you think.  As we recommend simple portfolio-level metrics to guide our road trip, we’ll define them, share how to interpret them, discuss the insights they provide, and offer guidance on how to gather or aggregate them from team execution data.  We will also touch on why and how the use of an easy to understand metaphor has aided significantly in creating and sustaining engagement amongst stakeholders for portfolio inception and governance activities.  Participants will leave having learned how to successfully navigate their next enterprise-wide initiative using quantitative data to promote alignment, maximize return on investment, foster engagement and reduce risk - everyone attending will receive a printed guide (worksheet) summarizing recommended metrics for agile portfolio management discussed.

  • Liked Simon Storm
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Simon Storm - Don't just do Agile. Do Agile right.

    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you struggling to implement Agile at your company?  What could be better than to learn from someone who has done it wrong over and over! We want to share our experiences pioneering Agile at a FinTech company.  After multiple attempts and through sheer stubbornness, we were we able to get it right and improve our release pace by 650% annually.  We will walk through where we went wrong, what we did right, and why we now understand that Agile cannot be successful without profound collaboration, Continuous Delivery, a DevOps culture and a desire to continuously improve.

  • Liked Steve Ropa
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Steve Ropa - DevOps is a Technical Problem AND a People Problem

    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Gerry Weinberg once said of consulting “There is always a problem, and it’s always a people problem.” The world of DevOps is emerging rapidly, and just like the early days of Agile, is still working on refining exactly what DevOps means.  So often, the focus is either on the technical aspects of the various tool, or on the people problem of “bringing Ops into the room”.  But what is the problem that DevOps addresses, and is that problem more of a technical problem, or a people problem?  We will explore this, and look at the possible intersection between the two “problems” and how a DevOps approach can help overcome them.

  • Liked Fadi Stephan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Fadi Stephan - Lean Discovery, Agile Delivery & the DevOps Mindset

    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    More and more organizations and teams are adopting Agile, however most stay focused on just the development part. They maintain a Big Upfront Requirements/Design (BRUF) phase and still have a long test and deployment phase. This approach results in more of a mini-waterfall approach rather than an Agile approach where we actually place valuable products in our customers’ hands. The old risks and pain points are still there: are we building the right thing? Is it valuable and usable? Does it work? So the true benefits of an Agile approach in terms of quality valuable products and higher ROI is never achieved due to our long cycles and slow feedback loops. Come to this session to see how Lean Discovery and Agile Delivery combined with a DevOps mindset, can make actual delivery of customer value sustainable. We will look at how Lean Discovery replaces BRUF and ensures the team is constantly building the right thing. We will also see how applying Agile Engineering practices ensure that the team is building the thing right and how a DevOps mindset ensures that the product the team builds actually gets delivered to the customer early and often.

  • Liked Nayan Hajratwala
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Nayan Hajratwala - Refactoring Real Legacy Code (guided by Simple Design)

    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The many trivial testing and refactoring examples available on the web are difficult for developers to apply to real-world code bases. As a result, many "new to agile" developers don't attempt to apply tests or refactorings to legacy code, reserving these techniques for the ever elusive greenfield project.
    To help developers with this dilemma, this session will walk through a real legacy Java code base, and go through the steps required to bring the code under test & begin to perform useful refactorings. All of this will be done under the guidance of the principles of Simple Design.

  • Liked Theresa Smith
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Theresa Smith - Product Design with Intent: How to Drive Product Design in an Agile Project

    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    When design is based on random choices, the end product is an assembly of random elements that have little or nothing in common. But when design forces all elements to work together then it makes a single, powerful, and meaningful impression to the user. While agile can get the job done faster, it doesn’t help guide design choices for a software product.    

    This session presents a design driven approach called Strong Center Design that incorporates design into an agile workflow.

    If you have an interest in improving design of your software products, then this is the session for you.

  • Liked Brandon Raines
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Brandon Raines - Agile Planning and Estimating Techniques in a Federal World

    Brandon Raines
    Brandon Raines
    Agile Coach
    Shokunin LLC
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    The government is seeing the merit of using agile practices to develop software.  However, the fallacy that you can’t estimate projects using agile in the government still exist.  The result is that many projects that want to use Agile begin in a very waterfall way developing the initial plan and are forced to stick to that plan throughout the project despite using sprints throughout the ‘development phase’.  Many falsely believe they are stuck in the tradition of estimating everything in the beginning.  During this presentation, through lecture and based upon real experiences, we will demonstrate techniques for developing a project plan and estimating techniques to satisfy the typical government compliance requirements using Agile practices and principles.  In essence, we will together learn how to build the bridge from the traditional government practices to a brave new world where we can plan, estimate and still inject agility.

  • 45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    DevOps as a buzzword is gaining traction, but what does it really mean? Managers, non-techies, and developers-new-to-devops will get a guided demo of development automation. See all the cool tools in action - continuous integration, automated testing, cloud deployment, etc. More importantly, we'll walk through what they do, and why that adds value to a project. 

    This talk will...

    • Break down the buzzwords and define some key technical practices in plain english.
    • Uncover the pain that leads teams to seek greater automation.
    • Demonstrate a continuous integration pipeline working in practice via live demo.
    • Diminish the knowledge gap between technical practitioners and managers/analysts/coaches.
    • Level-up the vocabulary of non-technical attendees.
    • Introduce practices to developers who don't yet work in an automated environment.
    • Spark "ah-ha" moments to convert skeptics into DevOps believers!

    By the way, all of the tools in the demo are some combination of free and/or open source. DevOps doesn't have to cost a lot.

  • 45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Most scrum teams create effort estimates, often using story points. As a product owner, you also want to have an estimate of the business value of each user story. Business value estimates help you create a more rational backlog and maximize the value the team delivers.

    This workshop explores the art and science of estimating the business value of user stories. Participants will gain an understanding of the essence of business value,
and why it is more complex than just revenue or profit. Then we will then learn a surprisingly simple technique to estimate and quantify business value.

     

  • Liked Ken Furlong
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Ken Furlong - How to Organize Multi-Team Programs

    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Why does the Agile community encourage cross-functional teams?  So many large organizations have naturally organized into system-specific teams.  This is a very common and logical approach.  At scale, though, it creates serious impediments to organizational agility and getting things done.  We'll discuss the roots of that phenomenon, one of our key interests in cross-functional teams, patterns for enabling such a team structure, some failure modes, and how to prevent them.  Please join us!

  • Liked Simon Storm
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Simon Storm - Agile Portfolio Management - Taking Agile Up the Corporate Ladder

    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    While many companies are adopting Agile development practices, it is fascinating how most of the management team in these companies are still starting trying to budget and plan in one year increments. Budget and planning starts in the fall and managers are literally guessing what they will need and what they are going to be working on 12 months down the road. It is inevitable that within the first few months of the plan there is going to a major event that is going make the plan completely irrelevant. It could be a new project that came out of nowhere, an issue with a major application that needs all hands to address, or the simple fact that as the team has completed work throughout the year, what was important at the beginning of the year is no longer important. 

    In this talk we will share the experiences of the IT management team of a small financial services firm that took a conference room and Scrum and found a way to improve throughput, increase visibility, and improve coordination across IT, all while delivering projects, responding to auditors and growing the company's product portfolio. 

     

     

     

  • Liked Sally Elatta
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Sally Elatta - Enterprise Agility Starts with Healthy Teams, How Healthy is YOUR Agile Team?

    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Have you been adopting Agile methods across several teams but wondering if there is a consistent way to measure their health and progress? What does it even mean to be a "healthy" Agile team? Take a deeper dive with our dynamic Agile Expert, Sally Elatta, as she walks you through the top 5 metrics you need to be looking at to measure the health and performance of your Agile teams and how you can create a continuous growth process where teams, programs and portfolios are getting better quarter after quarter.

    Learning Objectives: 

    • How do you really measure TeamHealth and what metrics should you look for?
    • Why it's important to look at both Qualitative and Quantitative measures and not just focus on 'hard metrics'. 
    • How to create a continuous quarterly growth process that is predictable and measurable.
    • Go through a TeamHealth retrospective simulation!

    This will be an engaging and hands on session where attendees get to color a blank TeamHealth radar using crayons and have a tangible output they can share with their teams. 

     

     

  • Liked Yuval Yeret
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Yuval Yeret - Boosting agile in the trenches

    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    More and more organizations have already reached some level of Agility. Some of them reached what we call Stable/Recharge which means they stabilized some structure/process that works for them. They had a couple of months or even years to “digest”/”recharge” and are now waking up hungry for the next level. Others got stuck along the way with some process that frustrates them but they didn’t really know what to do with it and just continued to suffer. These ones typically have a grudge towards agile when we meet them. People in these two groups have some common ground - they have a lot to benefit if they get exposed to some practical tips and tricks from the trenches that can help connect “by the book” agile to the day to day reality in the typical organization.

    In this "Agile Boost Camp" session we will give participants ideas/tips for working through typical boost/reset challenges. These tips/ideas are inspired by working in the trenches with real world organizations.

    Each time this session/workshop runs is different because the workshop runs in an agile form where the participants act as the “Product Owners” choosing and customizing the agenda. The trainer brings in the experience and best practices as well as orchestrates the workshop experience.

    Ready for your Boost?

     

  • Liked Richard Cheng
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Richard Cheng - Let's all agree to agree - The importance of a Team Charter

    Richard Cheng
    Richard Cheng
    Principal
    Excella Consulting
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    We've all see Project Charters.  Project Charters usually state the vision, mission, roadmaps, and is hand top down to the teams.  However, how many of us have Team Charters in place.  Team Charters are one of the most powerful tools a team has when it comes to being able to work effectively together.

    This workshop explores the dynamics of creating a team charter, the definition of ready, and the definition of done and how all this works together to create software that is ready for review, to potentially shippable, to released into production.

     

  • Liked Wyn Van Devanter
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Wyn Van Devanter - Going Green: Getting and keeping your build pipeline green

    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    A build pipeline is such an important aspect of a software project.  It saves a ton of manual, error-prone depoyment work, as well as results in higher quality software that can be released more frequently.    

    However, I have been on multiple projects where one of the steps in the continuous integration process was failing (red), often for multiple days or even perpetually.  So much of the benefit a build pipeline provides is lost when this is allowed to happen.  Bugs are not caught by automated tests; additional tests break without being fixed because no one notices; the culture of keeping a green pipeline diminishes and faith in everything from the pipeline itself to automated tests reduces.  Developers learn bad habits.   

    Building the pipeline and getting all steps working (keeping it green!) is no small feat in the first place, and keeping it that way can also be a large undertaking. One way I have tried to combat this is to institute some specific process for the Scrum team, pertaining to monitoring and maintaining the build pipeline.  There is also an aspect of convincing the team and management that it is worth spending the time, and dropping everything to maintain a fully functional pipeline.  

    Join me for a common sense, tactile approach to keep a build pipeline green that has worked on small and larger projects with multiple teams.